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Pet Peeves:

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  • Pet Peeves:

    There are some people do around and with horses that tend to irritate us.

    I always wonder, as I have seen some clinicians do, why they spend all the time in the world, patiently and correctly introducing a saddle and saddling to a colt, so it doesn't fight the process and, once the saddle is on, they turn the colt loose with the saddle and shoo it around.
    The colt then of course will buck and buck and buck from the new strange thing on it's back and tight around it's middle, while the clinician and audience giggle, saying "he has to get used to the saddle"

    I say, why not keep control of the colt and let it ease out there without fireworks, so it keeps trusting all is ok, there is nothing to the saddle and cinch, just going on as it had been doing that all their lives?
    Why TEACH them to buck so well right off, as they try to get rid of those strange sensations, when we are not rodeo training bucking horses?
    Why is it fun to watch them buck scared?

    If we had started colts like that, we would have been told WE were doing it wrong, we were bringing resistences in the horse, when we were supposed to teach a horse to respond readily without question or acting up.

    I saw Ray Hunt pull that one with a halter broke, gentle coming four year old black gelding .
    That colt never did quit bucking that afternoon, Ray said he would next morning, but he didn't next morning either, so sensibly no one topped him in that clinic.
    If he had just taken control of the colt with a lead, he would have been able to talk him out of it and get him going forward, as he obviously was not getting over it on it's own.
    I am sure the colt finally learned to get along, but why not make it easy from the start?

    There is some I probably do that others don't like, as feeding treats, that cowboys shake their heads when I do.
    Then, when something scared all the horses, guess who's horse came right back when called, for a treat?

  • #2
    I can't stand it when people don't untack their horses right away after a ride. They leave their horse standing, girth tight and all, while they take their helmet off, re-do their hair, go to the bathroom, tend to their dog or another horse or take their boots off, whatever. Sometimes I'll even untack the horse for them, to make a point.

    And, to that end, it drives me bonkers when people whip the saddle off and turn the horse right back out- with a huge saddle sweat mark, not even bothering to curry over it. It just looks so disrespectful to the animal- "rode hard and put away wet."
    The best is yet to come

    Comment


    • #3
      I was always taught that unless you are bleeding and near death, you take care of your horse first!!
      Good idea Bluey!!
      The problem with political jokes is that they get elected.
      H. Cate

      Comment


      • #4
        I can't stand to see someone riding a horse and being absolutely oblivious to their horses discomfort....be it from an ill fitting saddle, crazy long shanks on the bit, lameness, what ever. Been on enough trail rides and seen plenty of poorly fitting saddles, and lame horses, even saw one lady riding her horse with the bit upside down! And while we're on that subject please make sure your horse is in shape enough to ride. I've seen more than my fair share of skinny horses force marched on 10 or 15 mile trail rides looking like concentration camp survivors.
        "My biggest fear is that when I die my husband is going to try to sell all my horses and tack for what I told him they cost."

        Comment


        • #5
          Sale ads that show the rider standing on the saddle. I guess it's to demonstrate how broke the horse is, but it bugs me still.

          The second PP is people who insist on riding bareback when they have consistently demonstrated they do not have the seat, by falling off and injuring themselves. No helmet either.
          When people show you who they truly are, believe them. Maya Angelou

          Comment


          • #6
            safety is my stickler!

            When people walk a horse incorrect with the lead wrapped around their hand.

            Or tie to objects not meant to be tied to like fences, stall bars, or movable objects.

            Biggest Pet Peeve in the world..an uncontrollable horse. Owners that think putting on a chain or getting after a horse to put it in its place is either too much work or will hurt mopsys feeling. A dangerous horse on the ground makes me angry because 9 out of 10 times its because of irresponsible handling. Correct the horse if doesn't respect your space, runs by you in a hurry to get to turnout, bites you because your hand is on the lead, or overall has horrible manners when being handled on the ground. These horses put everyone in danger handlers and casual bystanders.

            Comment

            • Original Poster

              #7
              People getting on their horse, even from a mounting aid, with a big plop, where the horse sinks from the hit.

              People standing and moving around on a bareback horse with their boots on, that we know must be digging on the poor horse's back.
              Vaulting, we always had a pad on the back when standing there.

              I love to see people being attentive and polite to their horses.

              Comment


              • #8
                Allowing the bit to crack against the horse's teeth ~

                Drives me nuts when people allow the bits to crack against the horse's teeth when putting on the bridle and or when taking it off !
                Zu Zu Bailey " IT'S A WONDERFUL LIFE ! "

                Comment


                • #9
                  Leaving dried-sweat bridle marks on their faces makes me crazy

                  putting an ice cold bit in their mouth
                  Do not toy with the dragon, for you are crunchy and good with ketchup!

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    oooh for a start: people that don't pick feet, plopping bothers me too, major big time (esp if you are the seller ), using harsh bits makes me cringe (include rough hands and banging the bit on the mouth), poor fitting cheap saddles, using a horse like a sofa when it has been working hard all day out in the heat (at shows) just get OFF and loosen the girth! ie: also not warming a horse up appropriately, nor cooling down; 2 meals a day! for an animal meant to graze, stall confinement vs turn-out, not mowing pasture weeds, the Amish not watering their horses when tied waiting - sometimes ALL day; trailering without fly masks (esp with the windows down or a stock with open slats), posters who go on and on and don't use paragraphs

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by thatsnotme View Post
                      putting an ice cold bit in their mouth
                      That drives me nuts too

                      Comment

                      • Original Poster

                        #12
                        ---" ... posters who go on and on and don't use paragraphs ..."---

                        Oh, yeah, that too.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          JustTrails: "Sale ads that show the rider standing on the saddle. I guess it's to demonstrate how broke the horse is, but it bugs me still.:

                          This bugs me also. There is a trainer around here that can't wait to show his customers that he can "stand" on their horse's back. Why? How does that demonstrate they are broke? What discipline requires standing on the back? He pushes them hard just so he can stand on their back.

                          I could stand on my mare's back, but why?

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Small pet peeve but drives me bonkers. People who leave blankets, halters, equipment laying around on the ground, in the aisles or grooming areas. They take it off to tack up and then leave it all in a pile on the floor. Makes me nuts. There are loads of hooks, racks etc. are we that lazy that we can't reach the halter over to the hook instead of dropping it on the floor?!?
                            We couldn't all be cowboys, so some of us are clowns.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              People who don't groom after riding. You don't have to give your horse a hose bath but at least grab a wet rag and rub out the sweat marks.

                              People who just sit on their horses after a lesson or a class in a show. Your horse just carted your butt around - if you want to stand around gabbing, at least get off your horse and give it a break!

                              People who say "my saddle fits everything." Sorry but it doesn't.

                              People who don't warm up and head straight to work.

                              And of course people who neglect and abuse their horses.
                              My Mustang Adventures - Mac, my mustang | Annwylid D'Lite - my Cob filly

                              "A horse's face always conveys clearly whether it is loved by its owner or simply used." - Anja Beran

                              Comment


                              • #16
                                [QUOTE=Bluey;5323696]

                                I always wonder, as I have seen some clinicians do, why they spend all the time in the world, patiently and correctly introducing a saddle and saddling to a colt, so it doesn't fight the process and, once the saddle is on, they turn the colt loose with the saddle and shoo it around.



                                Coming from a more "western" perspective in the training world I can tell you what the thinking is.....not that I necessarily agree with it. It is a bit of a carry over from when every cowboy broke his own ranch horse and rodeo and ranch work were barely separated...rodeo events of today evolved from ranch competitions. The idea was that a horse could buck as long as he wanted and would discover it was futile...and never try it again. In many cases it worked fine. In a few it didn't. And in a rare few it taught some fancy bucking (these became rodeo stock!).

                                In my own training I would much rather they never learn to buck with a saddle on. I don't care if they buck while playing but once tack is on, I want to see business. However, there are a few that have, over the years, walked off nicely with the saddle and then just blown up....I can stop them in most cases but at that point in time I usually let them decide for themselves that the saddle is NOT coming off no matter what antics they throw at it AND let them get over the initial efforts and start moving forward....and I don't stop them until I see them relax while still packing it around.

                                I agree that it is much different from the type of training that most English horses get....but I also know that I've never had one of these buck again once they did everything they could think of and fail to dislodge the saddle. It can be a tough lesson sometimes (but actually most are two year olds or maybe three year olds, are smaller horses and they just don't go at it all that long in most cases....and most aren't all that creative about it either...most of the time those bucks could be ridden through).
                                Colored Cowhorse Ranch
                                www.coloredcowhorseranch.com
                                Northern NV

                                Comment


                                • #17
                                  Yep...I hate the stand on its back thing too.

                                  Ill mannered animals (and kids) that the owner (parent) makes excuses for by the truckload rather than fix the problem. "She was abused, hate men, only trusts women, can't be ridden down the left hand trail, must always have xxx done before you can do whatever, will only lead from the left, can't stand to have wet feet......" You can't change their history but you sure can (and should) change their current behavior and attitude if they are a problem....goes for horses, dogs and kids equally well.
                                  Colored Cowhorse Ranch
                                  www.coloredcowhorseranch.com
                                  Northern NV

                                  Comment

                                  • Original Poster

                                    #18
                                    [QUOTE=coloredcowhorse;5324192]
                                    Originally posted by Bluey View Post

                                    I always wonder, as I have seen some clinicians do, why they spend all the time in the world, patiently and correctly introducing a saddle and saddling to a colt, so it doesn't fight the process and, once the saddle is on, they turn the colt loose with the saddle and shoo it around.



                                    Coming from a more "western" perspective in the training world I can tell you what the thinking is.....not that I necessarily agree with it. It is a bit of a carry over from when every cowboy broke his own ranch horse and rodeo and ranch work were barely separated...rodeo events of today evolved from ranch competitions. The idea was that a horse could buck as long as he wanted and would discover it was futile...and never try it again. In many cases it worked fine. In a few it didn't. And in a rare few it taught some fancy bucking (these became rodeo stock!).

                                    In my own training I would much rather they never learn to buck with a saddle on. I don't care if they buck while playing but once tack is on, I want to see business. However, there are a few that have, over the years, walked off nicely with the saddle and then just blown up....I can stop them in most cases but at that point in time I usually let them decide for themselves that the saddle is NOT coming off no matter what antics they throw at it AND let them get over the initial efforts and start moving forward....and I don't stop them until I see them relax while still packing it around.

                                    I agree that it is much different from the type of training that most English horses get....but I also know that I've never had one of these buck again once they did everything they could think of and fail to dislodge the saddle. It can be a tough lesson sometimes (but actually most are two year olds or maybe three year olds, are smaller horses and they just don't go at it all that long in most cases....and most aren't all that creative about it either...most of the time those bucks could be ridden through).
                                    I am not sure that worked so well, since plenty of cowboy horses were "coldbacked".
                                    That means they spent the first minutes after being saddled and/or with someone on board trying to buck the saddle and/or cowboy off.
                                    Some kept it up the whole ride, any chance they got.
                                    Bad, bad habit to get into, really.
                                    I had a few of those to retrain over the years, one we called "Hoppy", for obvious reason.

                                    Comment


                                    • #19
                                      Originally posted by simc24 View Post
                                      I can't stand it when people don't untack their horses right away after a ride. They leave their horse standing, girth tight and all, while they take their helmet off, re-do their hair, go to the bathroom, tend to their dog or another horse or take their boots off, whatever. Sometimes I'll even untack the horse for them, to make a point.

                                      And, to that end, it drives me bonkers when people whip the saddle off and turn the horse right back out- with a huge saddle sweat mark, not even bothering to curry over it. It just looks so disrespectful to the animal- "rode hard and put away wet."
                                      I agree. Horses give people so much that I think it's a slap in the face when they aren't taken care of after a ride.

                                      Comment


                                      • #20
                                        I'm all for the "keep the horse under control" style of breaking!! I don't ever want a horse to learn that he CAN buck. IMO once they learn they CAN, it's always in the back of their bag of tricks. We used to get some really well bred race horses from a client who sent them to a cowboy to "buck them out" before sending them to us at the race track. I can recall a few times when the cowboy "broke" horses had a hissy and went to bronking!! Not fun in an exercise saddle with your stirrups jacked up!! And as far as riders tending to their own thirst, messy hair or dirty hands and face before taking care of their horse....not on my watch!! My students KNOW they have to give full attention to the horse's needs before they plunk themselves in the shade and enjoy a cool drink. "Horsey" has toted your butt for the past hour...he comes first!! I've had parents insist that it was too hot/cold for Suzy Q to take care of her own horse!!! Yea, right.
                                        www.crosscreeksporthorses.com
                                        Breeders of Painted Thoroughbreds and Uniquely Painted Irish Sport Horses in Northeast Oklahoma

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