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Cows!

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  • Cows!

    So, the farmer down the road calls my husband and asks
    him to watch for a 200 lb calf that has escaped. He was last
    seen in the woods at the bottom of property. The stream is
    dry, so he may come looking for water. OK, hubby says.

    Forward to evening. We are in the barn picking out and we
    hear mooing. We go out and find the farmer with two cows in
    a stock trailer trying to lure calf. It is pitch dark, so we agree
    to let him come back in AM with decoy cows and put them in
    one of our paddocks.

    Farmer comes and deposits friendly-seeming cows in paddock.
    We leave all the horses in since the 18 handers are now 22
    hands and we did not want to be chasing horses, too.
    Boarders (and us) enjoy the cow novelty for an hour or so.
    Hey, they eat apples! and hay stretcher! and drink out of the
    automatic waterers! and they let you pat them! Cool! We
    have elevated to petting zoo status.

    Afternoon comes, and cows are bored with their hay. I watch
    from the house as they walk up to three board fencing and
    just push on it. Did not care about electric fence. I now
    'get' why barbed wire is used. After all, they are made of
    leather. They pop the middle rail off and calmly walk over the
    lower rail onto the lawn.

    I call the farmer, he is two towns away but will come.
    I tell hubby 'they are friendly, we can handle them. After
    all, we lead Fabian who is three times their size every day'
    I get a bucket of hay stretcher and a lead rope. They see
    the bucket and let me feed them. NO WAY will they let me wrap the lead around their necks. They buck and run from
    me. Note - the are MUCH larger without the fence between
    us.

    Hubby sees this is not going to work. Boarder who thinks
    herding cattle might be fun - after all, we grew up on westerns- changes her mind and runs back to barn.
    Horses are all plastered to their windows watching the
    cows dissing me. They now know I AM NOT HEAD MARE.
    I can hear the wheels turning in the barn.

    Luckily cows run into another paddock. Hubby (who is now
    in the truck - I know where he goes when the chips are
    down!) parks the truck blocking the gate so they can't push
    on it. Farmer arrives, saying he just got a call that calf has
    been corralled next door. He comes with trailer and collects
    all three.

    This morning, stalls are a mess. Horses must have been spinning all night looking for COWS!. Turnout this morning
    was a series of snorts and spooks. They were COWS! for
    goodness sake. There are horses who actually EARN A LIVING
    working cattle. Get over it!

    Just another weekend on the farm.
    www.settlementfarm.us

  • #2
    In the eyes of my eldest OTTB gelding, cattle are aliens who are coming to take him to the mother ship.
    My youngest thinks the SMELL of them is horrifying.
    So, what time are we invited over for barbecue?
    Dee
    Founder of the I LOFF my worrywart TB clique!
    Official member of the "I Sing Silly Songs to My Animals!" Clique
    http://wilddiamondintherough.blogspot.ca/

    Comment


    • #3
      Very funny!

      I let a local farmer put cows on our farm (though he has his own fields and yes, uses barbed wire). I cannot stand how cows test the fences until they find the one weak place and are through.

      Our cows did that when the farmer asked to keep them up near the house while they got used to our farm. No problem -- except the cows found the one gate that was not well attached between two buildings, closing off a 5 foot wide "aisle" between my parents' house and a shed. The cows all went through, ended up on the front lawn and ate the heads off each oriental lily in the garden, thus killing most. (I had planted about fifty as a present to my parents . . . grrrrr)!
      https://www.facebook.com/SugarMapleFarm
      Follow us on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/peonyvodka/
      www.PeonyVodka.com

      Comment


      • #4
        Aww I love cows!

        Sounds like you had a rather exciting weekend. I've had similar experiences when a tame and very friendly/curious hog escaped and took herself on a tour of the neighborhood.

        Comment


        • #5
          Cows and lawns don't do well together.
          Cows leave divots in pretty lawns that never again will fill and big splatters that are hard to pick up out of that lawn grass.

          We use our cattle to mow around the barns at times, that keeps the rattlers out, without having to spray and they do a fine job there, but NOT on the lawn.

          Cows will learn to respect a single, almost invisible hot wire if you introduce them to it where they touch it with their wet noses.
          That gets their attention.
          If they don't see it and graze under it, they most times just walk right thru it without notice.
          One that figures there is a way to get past hot wire, you can't keep in or out of anything.
          Hot wire is not the best, but some times, because it is portable fencing, many use it.

          I am glad that momma cow got her baby back, although by now they don't care as much, are getting ready to wean the pesky critters off anyway, unless that was a short age calf, born late in the season, since he is still so little, or from a fall calving herd.

          I hope your horses have shrunk back to their regular size.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by dotneko View Post
            So, the farmer down the road calls my husband and asks
            him to watch for a 200 lb calf that has escaped. He was last
            seen in the woods at the bottom of property. The stream is
            dry, so he may come looking for water. OK, hubby says.

            Forward to evening. We are in the barn picking out and we
            hear mooing. We go out and find the farmer with two cows in
            a stock trailer trying to lure calf. It is pitch dark, so we agree
            to let him come back in AM with decoy cows and put them in
            one of our paddocks.

            Farmer comes and deposits friendly-seeming cows in paddock.
            We leave all the horses in since the 18 handers are now 22
            hands and we did not want to be chasing horses, too.
            Boarders (and us) enjoy the cow novelty for an hour or so.
            Hey, they eat apples! and hay stretcher! and drink out of the
            automatic waterers! and they let you pat them! Cool! We
            have elevated to petting zoo status.

            Afternoon comes, and cows are bored with their hay. I watch
            from the house as they walk up to three board fencing and
            just push on it. Did not care about electric fence. I now
            'get' why barbed wire is used. After all, they are made of
            leather. They pop the middle rail off and calmly walk over the
            lower rail onto the lawn.

            I call the farmer, he is two towns away but will come.
            I tell hubby 'they are friendly, we can handle them. After
            all, we lead Fabian who is three times their size every day'
            I get a bucket of hay stretcher and a lead rope. They see
            the bucket and let me feed them. NO WAY will they let me wrap the lead around their necks. They buck and run from
            me. Note - the are MUCH larger without the fence between
            us.

            Hubby sees this is not going to work. Boarder who thinks
            herding cattle might be fun - after all, we grew up on westerns- changes her mind and runs back to barn.
            Horses are all plastered to their windows watching the
            cows dissing me. They now know I AM NOT HEAD MARE.
            I can hear the wheels turning in the barn.

            Luckily cows run into another paddock. Hubby (who is now
            in the truck - I know where he goes when the chips are
            down!) parks the truck blocking the gate so they can't push
            on it. Farmer arrives, saying he just got a call that calf has
            been corralled next door. He comes with trailer and collects
            all three.

            This morning, stalls are a mess. Horses must have been spinning all night looking for COWS!. Turnout this morning
            was a series of snorts and spooks. They were COWS! for
            goodness sake. There are horses who actually EARN A LIVING
            working cattle. Get over it!

            Just another weekend on the farm.


            I've been around cows for quite a few years now, show them, and work with them on a weekly basis. I <3 cows! They are quite adventerous creatures and they are vERY inquisitive. Most don't bothered board fences (if they KNOW and have had previous experience with ones that dont come down easy). Horse electric fence doesn't work either. You need something with some zip that will light a fire under their hooves. . Board fences should always have the boards placed on the inside of the pasture (not the outside of the post which is closest topeople standing outside the fence). If its on the outside of the pasture perimiter, any animal can push up against it and pop the nails out. if the board is on the inside, they would have to PULL to get it off

            Most who arn't on halters regularly ...don't take kindly to being haltered or roped....especially in an unkown area. When they get loose its YEEEHHHAAAAA time!...WE'RE FREE!!!!!!!!...and they're all like that! Usually herding cows isn't too bad...just carry a big stick, a lunge whip, or a dressage or driving whip. When herding cows into the parlor we use a long skinny bamboo like stick. Tapping on their noses, butts, sides really helps. You dont need to beat them with it but it extends the length of your arm and is a VERY useful tool without getting into danger's path.

            Comment


            • #7
              The first year we were here the neighbor behind us kept cows and they.all.escaped. We'd just finished up a Sunday supper and had bid farewell to the family, daughter was in the kitchen washing up and we were preparing to digest our meal when we heard "Cows!" Huh? "There are cows in the front yard!" Well, this was before we'd fenced off for the horses, they weren't even here yet, so the cows had been out for some time and were moseying across the field on the way back from the other neighbor - the one with the landscaping and the pretty stone house .

              So here we are trying to find our neghbors' phone numbers, who we barely knew having just been there a couple of months, leaving them a garbled message, watching the cows, all 42 of them, head right on up the road (and I'm thinking, oh jeez, some dummy is going to drive on up the road and hit one and that's going to be a mess) and then I hear the sound of raindrops pattering - Wha? - it's the noise 42 sets of cow hooves make as they run down the road and stampede back through the field. We got the neighbor up and he came outside with the dogs and the lunge whip to herd them back down the lane to their field. Nope.

              So anyway the neighbor calls the landowner and he comes out all apologetic, the cow owners (leasing the field) show up after about half an hour, and DH and I and the owners get about 40 of them back in the field. You're quite right. They are immense. The last two got back in after another hour, and they left plenty of cow flops on the nice home's pretty concrete driveway as they bulldozed their way through the landscaping. The NeighborWithThe LungeWhip had two horses that watched the whole proceeding with great interest, whinnying encouragement and galloping from our side to the cows' *official* side of their field where they hung over the fenceline. The cows (actually cow/calf pairs for beef) got evicted shortly thereafter and the mares next door were very bored, at least until we got horses, and then PIGS! Pigs were traumatizing at first, but now they come on down to the fence and watch the action at feeding time every evening.

              Life in the country is always interesting.
              Courageous Weenie Eventer Wannabe
              Incredible Invisible

              Comment


              • #8
                I was talking to a horse friend of mine this weekend, and she said she found a small herd of beef cattle in her driveway. Not having a horse safe enough to try wrangling on her own, she got in the truck and checked the neighbors on each side. Turned out to belong to the Amish down the road. She arrived to find the grandparents of the family rocking on the porch. When she explained that she thought she had their cows wandering around her horse barn, the grandmother said (in broken English). "Kids got naught to do today. Pa put the cows out." The gist of it was, they had a herd of boys causing trouble around the house, so Grandpa turned the cows loose and told them to go catch 'em.

                When my friend asked what she should do with the cows, Grandma assured her the boys would be along shortly, and there would be enough of them to catch cows. See, even Amish have trouble keeping their kids occupied.... pretty inventive solution.
                ::Sometimes you have to burn a few bridges to keep the crazies from following you::

                Comment


                • #9
                  I'm wondering what all the fuss is about.

                  But then there's a cow or two... or 800 around here!

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Last summer, three calves were found wandering in the cornfields near my boarding barn. A couple of the teenaged boarders come from dairy farms, so we all trooped out to the cornfields next to the paddocks to try to round them up. Meanwhile, most of the horses in the paddocks were in a state of blind panic, stampeding wildly. However, my boy, who was four at the time, had installed some semblance of calm in his herd of geldings, and they galloped in formation over to the fenceline to investigate.

                    We eventually got all three calves into my boy's paddock and then tried to herd them into the round pen inside. In the process, we had to protect them from the horses. My boy was leading a calvalry charge of geldings against the calves and another little TB went right after them and was trying to herd them on his own.

                    Finally, about after an hour, all three calves were in the round pen and my boy spent about a half an hour walking round and round the pen, checking out the calves inside.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      You need a tranquiliser gun.

                      Read this, there's loads of handy hints and tips:

                      http://www.chronofhorse.com/forum/sh...t=tranquilizer

                      Anyway have you heard that

                      There's two cows running round wildy.
                      One of them says to the other, "So what do you think about this whole mad cow disease thing?"
                      The other says, "What do I care. I'm in a grand prix dressage competition in Vienna this afternoon."

                      Incidentally the cow did very well:

                      http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=W9wh3kyMKJU

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Well we are a one-heifer spread and it did take a while for some of the horses to decide she was not terrifying! The young geldings had lots of fun just watching her, like the All-cow channel. It was mostly one old mare that had the worst time. Mare would go hungry, just not to be eating across the fenceline from the heifer! Mare came around eventually, tolerates her, without doing stupid things in reaction to heifer movement.

                        Have to say the horses "know their cows" and easily can tell if a new cow is introduced or added to a group. Mare went thru the same stupids when we got a second animal!!

                        Your funny comments about not leading or accepting a rope is why my heifer gets led to her paddock of the day. She leads as good as a horse, pivots, whoa, backs easily, because SOMETIMES you need her to! We have pretty good luck with her coming when called, ALWAYS give her a treat when she does. She wears a collar with a bell, so if she should get out we can find her a bit easier. I have always found it amazing how well a cow of ANY COLOR can disappear in a tiny clump of weeds!! White, bright red, black, you can lose an enormous cow behind almost nothing if they want to hide. Herding cattle out west you depend on your horse to tell you if cows are in the bushes or send in a dog.

                        My heifer is a Dexter, small model even full grown. She stands about 42 inches, maybe 550 pounds. With smaller size she is not as hard on the ground, tearing it up like bigger animals. That size is ENOUGH cow for me if she bumps you to rub. 1000 pounds is WAY TOO much bovine! Here is a photo with daughter holding her.

                        http://good-times.webshots.com/photo...96750802HYaxJx

                        Have to say Carmel has been an EXCELLENT horse training accessory!! No one cares anymore about the smell, running with tail up, so cow education will be helpful to all these equines their whole lives. Daughter has been saying Team Penning LOOKS like a lot of fun, we now have fairly cattle safe horses, so maybe it needs checking out.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          That was so funny.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            LMAO we worked cattle on a regular basis so cattle were not a big deal to our horses. However watching horses who have never seen a cow before react is hilarious.
                            Adoring fan of A Fine Romance
                            Originally Posted by alicen:
                            What serious breeder would think that a horse at that performance level is push button? Even so, that's still a lot of buttons to push.

                            Comment


                            • #15

                              Well written!
                              "It's like a Russian nesting doll of train wrecks."--CaitlinandTheBay

                              ...just settin' on the Group W bench.

                              Comment


                              • #16
                                That is one cute heifer you have and she looks very smart too.
                                Beware of very smart cows, their name is Trouble.

                                Horses can tell one cow from another.
                                I was riding once an 18 year old cowhorse that I guess had never seen a paint cow before.
                                We rode up to a water hole and there were some steers there, one black and white.

                                That horse took some convincing that there was not a monster there.

                                Comment


                                • #17
                                  When Pink first saw cows (Pink, aka Miss Hunter Princess, who was plucked from the cushy-cushy life of bedded stalls and hot water wash racks and Baker sheets and thrown into *this* life), she thought they were not only aliens but also below her in every way possible. Watching a snotty pony snub a curious calf is hysterical!!

                                  I just found out recently (me, of the funny pants and helmet-always and "honey will you build me jumps?") that my darling boyfriend and horseman extraordinaire used her to rope calves one day while I was off kicking rocks and mad that I couldn't get the stubborn pony to canter.

                                  So Pink not only canters now, but she kinda likes cows too.
                                  COTH's official mini-donk enabler

                                  "I am all for reaching out, but in some situations it needs to be done with a rolled up news paper." Alagirl

                                  Comment


                                  • #18


                                    Too funny!

                                    Earlier this year I had a Cow Adventure of a dubious sort. I board off a nice gravel road with two big cow pastures on either side of a portion of it. My older TB has lived his entire life trying to make sure I know he is in NO WAY related to my old QH mare (she who was out of a working mare with the descriptive name of "Hardtack's Wirecut" - I'm pretty sure she was that Hardtack bred mare with the cut from wire). But back to Robbie. He's a TB and it isn't his lot in life to be subjected to COWZ!!1!!! Oh, he will pass by them, but he is always Highly Suspicious and at the very least you get The Ear of Doubt and very carefully placed footsteps - sort of like walking on eggshells, presumabley so he does not alert the horse eating COWZ!!1!!! to his presence.

                                    Yeah, well that's all well and good, but I have a youngster now and I'd like him to be a tad saner about this sort of thing, so I planned on ponying Lido on most of my down the road excursions so he could se the COWZ!!1!!! were not quite as dangerous as Robbie thought they were. Then come spring he would be under saddle and ready to brave the COWZ!!1!!! on his own.

                                    Yeah, that was the plan...

                                    So about the time the arctic circle retreated from my corner of the SE, apparently it was time to put the BULLZ!!1!!1 out with the COWZ!!1!!! ... Fine, sure it's just a big cow, you say... Robbie says differently. And I'm not sure I can argue with his logic, because each bull would station himself at the closest possible point to the other bull, and they would have long, hearfelt LOUD angry discussions about who had the better field of COWZ!!1!!! and how it's entirely possible thathe other one might have snuck over and took some COWZ!!1!!! from the other bull.

                                    As it so happened, this particular point of Serious Discussion put both bulls within a foot or two of the road at a place where the road was barely one lane wide.

                                    Now dotneko and I might understand why cows and barbwire go well together, but I can promise you a TB does not come with higher reasoning powers to grasp that a barb wire fence would offer some degree of protection against Very Angry BULLZ!!1!1!! I can honestly understand why he would display a degree of trepidation going between the two animals. Without the fencing (see higher cognitive reasoning) it would have been a fool's move. But being a brave (if not long suffering) soul, he did his best to comply and walked though the gauntlet under Extreme Duress.

                                    I thought better of ponying Lido along after my first experience. He generally makes up his own mind about what to be skeered of, but he wasn't going to ignore such obvious fear on the part of his equine leader. And all late winter those damn bullz were ALWAYS there. But Robbie was sort of getting used to the gauntlet, not comfortable, but enough that I thought maybe I could bring Lido along.

                                    Yeah, right...

                                    One day I was toodling up the hill towards the pasture where the COWZ!!1!!! are, and I noticed the BULLZ!!1!!! were there as well, although quiet (they particularly like to get noisy when we get between them - that adds to the fun). In the way of his kind (unhelpfully oblivious when it would be helpful to notice stuff), Robbie only sees the bull on the left. I, knowing that the only reason bull #1 would be here is if bull #2 is also hanging around (higher reasoning and all that). Yup, sure enough, he's sort of hidden by a bush along the road, but he's there. I try to get Robbie to SEE him, but he's seen his bull and he's not getting it out of his tiny little pea brain, so I brace myself for the leap-squat (22 to 12 hands in a nanosecond) when he finally sees Bull #2.

                                    Meanwhile unbeknownst to me, somewhere up over the hill beyond Bull #2 and down by the cow barn is a dumpster truck, the kind that pick up big commercial dumpsters. And at the EXACT moment Robbie notices Bull #2, the truck empties the dumpster with that very loud metallic WHAM WHAM WHAM! more or less sounding like it came from Bull #2.

                                    Robbie about died, his worst fears were realized. These weren't ordinary COWZ!!1!!! or even scary BULLZ!!1!!!, they were ALIEN METALLIC BORG COWZ!!1!!!

                                    I gave up on the idea of ponying Lido and have resigned myself to the fact I spent the entire winter effectively making my horse more scared of cows than he was before I started my special brand of training.It's a gift.
                                    Your crazy is showing. You might want to tuck that back in.

                                    Comment


                                    • #19
                                      We have a huge field behind us that house 150 Florida Cracker cattle. Babies and all. They are a hoot to watch, my mustang who we were told was a cow horse must be a scared of a cow horse. He will stand and watch them for hours!

                                      I loved the story!
                                      Ms Robin
                                      Farm Websites & SEO, Low Prices, Barter available!
                                      ~No Horses to Slaughter clique~

                                      Comment


                                      • #20
                                        My horse lived with Herefords. I was at an event doing cross country one day when we came around the corner to a jump next to a pasture of Black Angus. That horse, the horse who jumps ANYTHING put on the brakes so fast I about flew over his head. He did an about face and took off in the other direction! Luckily we weren't close enough to the jump for that to be considered a refusal but it took every ounce of strength I had to push him over that fence!

                                        Comment

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