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A Clean Stall is Like a Clean Diaper (How Horses Inadvertantly Prepared Me for Kids)

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  • A Clean Stall is Like a Clean Diaper (How Horses Inadvertantly Prepared Me for Kids)

    I was changing my 6wk old baby boy's diaper yesterday, and of course not 3 minutes after I was done he peed and pooped in the clean one.

    I was out at the barn later that same day and as soon as I'd finished cleaning my mare's stall, she marched to the center and peed and pooped in the clean shavings.

    That got me to thinking about how having horses inadvertantly prepared me to deal with kids .

    - The clean diaper/ clean stall thing.

    -They both require a ton of expensive gear, the purpose of some of it not immediately clear.

    - You can feel like everything is going great one day, and the next day you are right back into chaos (baby starts sleeping through the night ---> the toddler gets yet another ear infection/ you have worked hard to move up at the next show ---> your horse comes up lame the morning of the show)

    - I do not freak out every time my kid/ horse gets injured and I tend to take care of lots of minor scrapes/ cuts etc by myself instead of going to the doctor/ calling the vet.

    - Leaving the house requires a lot of organization/ going to a show or a hunt requires a lot of organization. I now keep doubles of essential gear (diaper bag/ spare clothes/ first aid---> grooming kit/ spare girth, saddlepad, halter, lead rope/ first aid) in my car/ trailer, to make getting out of the house/ barn that much easier.

    - When toddler/ horse had a tantrum, within microseconds I decide on an appropriate response and mete out the correction OR completely ignore the behavior and get on with it.

    I can think of a million more. Let's hear yours!
    ~Living the life I imagined~

  • #2
    Feed changes

    I still remember talking to my sister-in-law when her first kid was transitioning to whole milk. Apparently she just tried to give the kid a bottle of whole milk instead of breast milk one day, and then wondered why it didn't go well. She wanted to know what I'd done, since I hadn't had any problems. So I told her what I had done, which was mixing a very small amount of whole milk, like 1 oz, in with a whole bottle of formula. Next week, 2oz, and every week replacing 1 oz of formula with 1 oz of milk, until he was drinking milk instead of formula.

    She rolled her eyes at me, and told me that sounded like way too much work. Why on earth would I bother with all that fuss. I told her I wouldn't change my horse's diet that suddenly because he could colic, and why on earth would I feed my own child with less care and consideration than livestock.
    "In order to really enjoy a dog, one doesn’t merely train him to be semi-human. The point of it is to open oneself to the possibility of becoming part dog."
    -Edward Hoagland

    Comment


    • #3
      Discipline. Having horses prior to parenthood taught me to be patient, fair and consistent.

      It also served as an example to my daughter. When she was 3 or 4 she developed an annoying habit of squealing and stomping her feet (or sometimes kicking a leg at nothing in particular) when she was angry/frustrated. At this same age, she had been to the barn with me many times. So one day I said to her "You know, when the horses do that, I usually give them a bit of a smack and tell them to knock it off, and it is very hard to control my instinct to want to give you a smack when you do that". She thought about it for a bit and said "you're right, sorry Mom." And she stopped doing it.
      There are friends and faces that may be forgotten, but there are horses that never will be. - Andy Adams

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      • #4
        They both can be very destructive in a matter of minutes

        They both can be very cute and adorable... make your day and break your heart.

        Consistency is the key... give an inch and they'll take a mile ;-)

        Oh... by the way my child canters... I think it comes from having six horses and no siblings.
        http://www.leakycreek.com/
        http://leakycreek.wordpress.com/ Rainbows & Mourning Doves Blog
        John P. Smith II 1973-2009 Love Always
        Father, Husband, Friend, Firefighter- Cancer Sucks- Cure Melanoma

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        • #5
          Originally posted by MunchkinsMom View Post
          Discipline. Having horses prior to parenthood taught me to be patient, fair and consistent.

          It also served as an example to my daughter. When she was 3 or 4 she developed an annoying habit of squealing and stomping her feet (or sometimes kicking a leg at nothing in particular) when she was angry/frustrated. At this same age, she had been to the barn with me many times. So one day I said to her "You know, when the horses do that, I usually give them a bit of a smack and tell them to knock it off, and it is very hard to control my instinct to want to give you a smack when you do that". She thought about it for a bit and said "you're right, sorry Mom." And she stopped doing it.
          ROTFLMAO... I have lightening fast responses and have had to tell my kids this same thing...
          "Kindness is free" ~ Eurofoal
          ---
          The CoTH CYA - please consult w/your veterinarian under any and all circumstances.

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          • #6
            These are great! I'm having twins and when I tell people they kind of go . My best friend, though, says, "Well, you won't have known anything different, since these are your first, and you are probably more ready than any of us because you've always taken care of horses."
            Kendra -- Runningwater Warmbloods
            Home of EM Raleska (Rascalino/ Warkant) and Donatella M (Furstenball/ Jazz Time)
            'Like' us on Facebook

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            • #7
              I think walking a colicy horse all night isn't much different to staying up wiht a sick baby walking all night.

              What you feed has a direct result of how smelly it comes out at the other end.

              Kids and horses still have to be taken care of no matter how sick you are.
              If i'm posting on Coth, it's either raining so I can't ride or it's night time and I can't sleep.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by M.K.Smith View Post
                Oh... by the way my child canters... I think it comes from having six horses and no siblings.
                Different flavors of crazy, but totally NUTS. You know its true. - GreyHunterHorse

                http://showertimecontemplations.blogspot.com/

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by MunchkinsMom View Post
                  Discipline. Having horses prior to parenthood taught me to be patient, fair and consistent.

                  It also served as an example to my daughter. When she was 3 or 4 she developed an annoying habit of squealing and stomping her feet (or sometimes kicking a leg at nothing in particular) when she was angry/frustrated. At this same age, she had been to the barn with me many times. So one day I said to her "You know, when the horses do that, I usually give them a bit of a smack and tell them to knock it off, and it is very hard to control my instinct to want to give you a smack when you do that". She thought about it for a bit and said "you're right, sorry Mom." And she stopped doing it.

                  Good job! One of the cool things about kids is that you can *tell them* how you feel and what's coming. They have the option of dialing back the tantrum which is really all you wanted to accomplish.

                  Come to think of it, I can also indicate to horses that I'm getting to the end of my tolerance for whatever they're doing (and know is illegal). Again, I don't have to actually get tired or hurt my hand hitting them if I can let them know what's coming.

                  Horses and kids just want to get through the day with their needs being met and their parents still liking them. It's nice to be able to recognize that these powerful monsters want so very little.
                  The armchair saddler
                  Politically Pro-Cat

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Catersun View Post
                    What you feed has a direct result of how smelly it comes out at the other end.

                    Kids and horses still have to be taken care of no matter how sick you are.
                    Very true and very funny! Well, not so funny when you are sick and caring for the kids and/or horses, but true!
                    There are friends and faces that may be forgotten, but there are horses that never will be. - Andy Adams

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by hansiska View Post
                      These are great! I'm having twins and when I tell people they kind of go . My best friend, though, says, "Well, you won't have known anything different, since these are your first, and you are probably more ready than any of us because you've always taken care of horses."

                      If it makes you feel any better my mother said having twins first was easier both because you don't know any better and because they keep each other occupied.

                      This thread is a hoot. I never thought that all my experiences with horses and naughty ponies could have shaped my mothering. No wonder why so many of the other moms always looked at me like this:

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Kendra -- Runningwater Warmbloods
                        Home of EM Raleska (Rascalino/ Warkant) and Donatella M (Furstenball/ Jazz Time)
                        'Like' us on Facebook

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by hey101 View Post
                          I was changing my 6wk old baby boy's diaper yesterday, and of course not 3 minutes after I was done he peed and pooped in the clean one.

                          I was out at the barn later that same day and as soon as I'd finished cleaning my mare's stall, she marched to the center and peed and pooped in the clean shavings.

                          That got me to thinking about how having horses inadvertantly prepared me to deal with kids .

                          - The clean diaper/ clean stall thing.

                          -They both require a ton of expensive gear, the purpose of some of it not immediately clear.

                          - You can feel like everything is going great one day, and the next day you are right back into chaos (baby starts sleeping through the night ---> the toddler gets yet another ear infection/ you have worked hard to move up at the next show ---> your horse comes up lame the morning of the show)

                          - I do not freak out every time my kid/ horse gets injured and I tend to take care of lots of minor scrapes/ cuts etc by myself instead of going to the doctor/ calling the vet.

                          - Leaving the house requires a lot of organization/ going to a show or a hunt requires a lot of organization. I now keep doubles of essential gear (diaper bag/ spare clothes/ first aid---> grooming kit/ spare girth, saddlepad, halter, lead rope/ first aid) in my car/ trailer, to make getting out of the house/ barn that much easier.

                          - When toddler/ horse had a tantrum, within microseconds I decide on an appropriate response and mete out the correction OR completely ignore the behavior and get on with it.

                          I can think of a million more. Let's hear yours!
                          Thanks you for the post.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Both teach you when to pick a fight and when to provide a distraction.
                            "In the beginning, the universe was created. This made a lot of people angry and has widely been considered as a bad move." -Douglas Adams

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              LOL. . .wow, thank you to all those participating in this thread. . .for reminding me why I chose to remain childfree.
                              Please copy and paste this to your signature if you know someone, or have been affected by someone who needs a smack upside the head. Lets raise awareness.

                              Comment


                              • #16
                                I had a boss once whose cats clearly taught her how to bear the endless vicious scratches her sharp-fingernailed toddlers bestowed upon her. Every day it ws like "Oh, my God, Jill, was it Sassy or Ryan?" You wanted to declaw everyone.

                                I don't have kids, but I'd think there's a SUPER CUTE STUFF YOU CAN TOTALLY BUY AND FORCE THEM TO WEAR!!!!! connection with babies and horses. You can't fail to see the relationship between a horse wearing matching plaid accessories and an infant who CAN'T WALK wearing a smart pair of oxfords.

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