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Is Going Back To Riding Really Worth It?

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    #21
    Does walking help with your stiffness? I broke my back years ago, but walking and hiking really helps. I enjoy riding, but I also like walking with my donkey. I'm training two BLM burros to be hiking buddies for my family. Maybe a hiking buddy would help with the injuries you've sustained? A mni or a donk?

    Comment


      #22
      Originally posted by SuzieQNutter View Post
      It is amazing how we change.

      We start off wanting a horse that will take us to the Olympics.

      In the end we only care that the horse is sound and safe to ride.
      Oh my goodness, SO true.

      Comment


        #23
        I think everyone's answer to this question- is it worth it?- will be different.

        Once you take some lessons, and feel comfortable, would any of your retires be appropriate for hacking around? Personally I'm fully in favor of people hacking out their slightly unsound old retired horses at the walk. I think it keeps them moving and I think many of them enjoy it. There's really no harm in going for a walk around the farm or a short trail ride. This is provided though, that the horse doesn't have something like wobblers, or terrible kissing spines, or something else that makes him unsafe to sit on or gives him terrible pain when being sat on. But your average old, arthritic horse that's pasture sound, maybe had some soft tissue, joint or bone injury years ago... he can probably wander around at a walk and might really like it. If any of them were safe to ride when they were younger, they might enjoy (and you might enjoy) just going for some walks now.

        Comment

          Original Poster

          #24
          I am just overwhelmed with all the replies. You guys are indeed awesome!

          Ruth- Of my remaining horses I have the grey that could be sent to another trainer who would actually do the job requested, but I don't know if I could ever deal with him as any sort of trustworthy partner. I have one mare who is a 1994 model, another mare who has sight issues and is a 1997 model. I have the 2002 TB gelding who is unrideable due to EPM issues and I have my daughters 1999 pony. I can still ride him, you know throw a western saddle on him and take him down the trail. He is a little 14H fellow who was always a rock star under saddle but as I am 6 foot in my stocking feet a have put on a few pounds I am at the top end of his weight scale. So combined with his age, lack of condition and my size maybe not such a great idea.

          ML Oaks- In my case walking aggravates instead of helps. My job involves tons of walking and lifting so I get my "steps' In every work day. Funny, you say that but we have a creek in the back of the property and my daughters pony does double as pack mule in the areas where the terrain is too sloped and dangerous for the ATV.

          CHT and Red Horses- Why do you guys have to be in Canada! I would LOVE some barn friends who are supportive and and not afraid to say "What if we?"

          I think that is the downside of having your own place, with horses at home. Granted, I Love the "No Drama" lifestyle, my fly spray is always right where I left it. I love having the ability to feed at whatever time suits me and in whatever clothes suit me (like my bathrobe this particular am ) I love being able to have my elderly horses right where I can see them at any time. Pony had a phallectomy earlier this summer and I got to be with him in person or video with hubby on the property for the first 72 hours. I could make sure his stall stayed perfectly clean and that the bleeding stayed in control. This is all so good, but it is lonely, no one to ride with, no input from other horse people. I do know I always accomplished more with my riding in a barn atmosphere.

          Comment


            #25
            I had a horse. (Not technically mine, but that's kinda long and complicated; the "keep or send to sale barn" decision was mine to make.) He was often brilliant, he was often really fun to ride, he was a blast cross-country, and we were developing well together, but sometimes he cut loose with his inner batshit, riding him was *never* comfortable, and it was slowly eroding my confidence. (Two bad riding injuries in the last few years, though neither on this horse, didn't help.) Deciding to hang it up with him was really hard but it's the best thing I ever did for my riding.

            Hard to answer the original question for anyone else, and I did take some time off, but for me coming back was so very very worth it. The hardest part for me was getting my head around the idea that sometimes the horse I've got is the wrong horse, despite a huge emotional investment to the contrary.

            Comment

              Original Poster

              #26
              Originally posted by amb View Post
              I had a horse. (Not technically mine, but that's kinda long and complicated; the "keep or send to sale barn" decision was mine to make.) He was often brilliant, he was often really fun to ride, he was a blast cross-country, and we were developing well together, but sometimes he cut loose with his inner batshit, riding him was *never* comfortable, and it was slowly eroding my confidence. (Two bad riding injuries in the last few years, though neither on this horse, didn't help.) Deciding to hang it up with him was really hard but it's the best thing I ever did for my riding.

              Hard to answer the original question for anyone else, and I did take some time off, but for me coming back was so very very worth it. The hardest part for me was getting my head around the idea that sometimes the horse I've got is the wrong horse, despite a huge emotional investment to the contrary.
              Amen Sister! I love him, he is my buddy, we could go do a ground work clinic, he could do showmanship at he AQHA congress and will hook on and do a showmanship pattern without a lead. We spent months on the groundwork when he first came to me. I like my horses polite. He is not for me to ride, I have accepted it, my husband does not want me hurt so although he has expressed that he does not want me on him again, he is also attached to him. I am so blessed to not have to make this choice, he can live here for as long as he likes and it doesn't affect my riding future.

              Comment


                #27
                Originally posted by four2farm@gmail.com View Post
                I am just overwhelmed with all the replies. You guys are indeed awesome!

                Ruth- Of my remaining horses I have the grey that could be sent to another trainer who would actually do the job requested, but I don't know if I could ever deal with him as any sort of trustworthy partner. I have one mare who is a 1994 model, another mare who has sight issues and is a 1997 model. I have the 2002 TB gelding who is unrideable due to EPM issues and I have my daughters 1999 pony. I can still ride him, you know throw a western saddle on him and take him down the trail. He is a little 14H fellow who was always a rock star under saddle but as I am 6 foot in my stocking feet a have put on a few pounds I am at the top end of his weight scale. So combined with his age, lack of condition and my size maybe not such a great idea.

                ML Oaks- In my case walking aggravates instead of helps. My job involves tons of walking and lifting so I get my "steps' In every work day. Funny, you say that but we have a creek in the back of the property and my daughters pony does double as pack mule in the areas where the terrain is too sloped and dangerous for the ATV.

                CHT and Red Horses- Why do you guys have to be in Canada! I would LOVE some barn friends who are supportive and and not afraid to say "What if we?"

                I think that is the downside of having your own place, with horses at home. Granted, I Love the "No Drama" lifestyle, my fly spray is always right where I left it. I love having the ability to feed at whatever time suits me and in whatever clothes suit me (like my bathrobe this particular am ) I love being able to have my elderly horses right where I can see them at any time. Pony had a phallectomy earlier this summer and I got to be with him in person or video with hubby on the property for the first 72 hours. I could make sure his stall stayed perfectly clean and that the bleeding stayed in control. This is all so good, but it is lonely, no one to ride with, no input from other horse people. I do know I always accomplished more with my riding in a barn atmosphere.
                I was in the same boat. Grieving over the loss if my mare overnight from colic and Pepper in his 20's. We had bought a farm before she died but hadn't moved in yet.

                It was not set up for horses, but cattle and I told hubby being in his 20's Peppy would probably go soon and I would be out of horses.

                Non horsey; never been on a horse, hubby, did not give up. We lost her on Father's Day which is in September for us. EVERY. SINGLE. DAY. he brought in ads for horses.

                No I don't want another horse. That is the wrong breed, wrong colour, wrong sex, wrong height, wrong discipline, wrong price, wrong age, etc,etc etc

                By April I finally figured out that if I did not say yes, he would bring home a horse and I would be the one stuck at home training it, so I may as well get one I liked.

                Hubby was chuffed as the next ad he brought was 16.2hh 3yo black/brown tb gelding $800.00.

                Nothing in there for me to diss. I said if he has raced I don't want him. He had raced 5 weeks before. Hubby rang off. I rang back and low and behold I bought the most intelligent horse I have ever owned and I had a blast.

                The biggest fight I have ever had with hubby happened when he was brought home.

                A co-worker said you dont want to ride Pepper he is too old. You want to buy a young one. Get on it at the bottom of a hill. Gallop it to the top and then you can ride.

                NOT ON MY WATCH.

                I put him on Pepper with the reins on a halter. He was taught how to drop his weight and he turns when you turn your head.

                Another fight with hubby. He is going to take Pepper out around the 2,000 acres.

                You can't.

                Yes I can.

                No you can't. You dont know how to trot yet.

                So I won't trot.

                You don't know that. You are not the boss. Pepper is.

                No he isn't.

                Oh yes he is.

                Plus you will be too sore.

                No I won't.

                Sigh! You don't know what you dont know and an adult male at the top of his work place actually never hears the word no. Short of hiding saddle and bridle. I am at a loss. So I go with him on the trail ride on the just off the track tb who has now been off the track 6 weeks by the time we picked him up and of course they never changed his feed from him racing.

                The first inkling that he was not in charge was asking Pepoer to halt while we were walking in front. Pepper did halt for 0.23 of a second, but he wanted to be in front not halting behind.

                I took him on a pretty horizontal, safe track but we ended up down a hill to our gate.

                Do you want to go on or go back? This is about 20 minutes!

                Home.

                No horse can keep up with Pepper on a walk towards home. I told hubby at a dip to shorten his reins, keep him in walk and don't trot. He shortened his reins an inch. Pepper shortened his neck a foot. He went into trot. Hubby grabbed with his legs. I am yelling hands down, take your legs off him. Hubby has his hands up past his ears and won't take his legs off and is in a full gallop for home.

                I have gathered up the tb before this happened and bless him he stayed still so not 2 horses racing for home. Believe me Pepper is fast at Pony Club he was nicknamed Speedy Gonzalas!

                I continue yelling. At the 90 degree turn to the driveway hubby finally thinks I wonder what will happen if I take my legs off. Pepper stopped.

                How the h*ll he didn't fall off I don't know.

                Fast forward 10 years. He has built a dressage arena, a tack shed, shelters, paddocks, etc, etc. He owns 2 tbs.

                HE CAN NOW RIDE.

                He has gone up to ride Sim before he goes to work. I go up in about 10 minutes. I ride Sim and put him away and I now have my own horse. I will ride him and I go to work this afternoon. He comes home from work, rides the other horse and feeds them.

                So all you need is someone who you can teach to ride. Problem solved and it does help to keep me motivated as well.

                It is better to ride 5 minutes a day than it is to ride 35 minutes on a Sunday.

                Comment


                  #28
                  OP, you have your own tribe out there with similar stories. At 60, I was finally out of the pony mom/groom stage and ready to have my own horse again without children. So of course I went out and fell in love with a lovely 16:3 grey OTTB. All was fine until he tripped, fell and rolled on me within 2 months of ownership. One ambulance ride, no hospital stay, but 2 months on crutches gave plenty of time for the "fear bird" to sit on my shoulder and chatter, building up a nice little pile of metaphorical bird crap. PT said a month of walking; so it gave me some time to start to send that annoying little sucker flying for short little stretches and eventually we got back on track and started foxhunting.

                  The fear bird still swoops down and does a fly bye or even sit for a second, but I say "no bird crap on my shoulder", laugh and brush it away. Some arthritis has cropped up in my lovely hunting partner and he will retire from riding before I will. My next partner will probably be smaller, and say "yes mam" with a Texas drawl, but no more OTTB projects. I will definitely get a been there type because I want to be riding as long as I can and feel making that kind of choice will increase the odds. I will take the greater caution that I did not have in my youth, but not lose the joy of riding even if the type of riding changes. I can thank COTH for the successful fear bird imagery (do a search "fear bird").

                  The answer to your question is YES, it is worth it! You have a good plan; start taking lessons and don't let yourself be pushed back into the competition mode unless you truly want to do it again. You are blessed with an area of lovely riding and a variety of choices, so regain the confidence and joy and let your heart dictate the choice rather then the trainers bottom line. At our state park you will see on any given day a variety of independent ladies riding the trails alone or in groups, all of a gracious age. Give yourself time to rehab your confidence just like you would take the time to properly rehab a horses leg injury. We look forward to cheering you on on your journey.

                  Comment

                    Original Poster

                    #29
                    Trot On- My neighbor is 75, has a handsome gaited mare and trail rides with her 63 year old buddy about 25 miles a week. The trailer rolls out 3x a week in all but the worst weather. Of course that's a little easier without a business to run. I have an invitation to come anytime so that is a thought as well. Thanks for the pep talk!

                    Suzie- My hubby has ZERO interest in riding, he treats them like big dogs and takes wonderful care of them. You are very lucky! Great story!

                    Comment


                      #30
                      I think we need to change our expectations as we age. I’ve had a few concussions and have some permanent damage so the stakes are high for me. I only ride my 25 year old gelding who is bombproof. He has some physical limitations but can still pop over the occasional jump and gallop across the field . My seat isn’t solid enough to sit a young buck or spook so I won’t try. I recently tried to start a horse with a mild buck and at first I thought “I can sit this until he bucks out” then I thought about what my consequences could be so I bailed out on my terms, rather than risk landing on my head. It was very humbling to realize my starting days are over. Sure, I miss my eventing days, but a good day on the trails is better than any day in the house.

                      Comment

                        Original Poster

                        #31
                        Weezer- Agreed this days are done for me as well.!

                        Comment


                          #32
                          Well, if you take some lessons you'll meet some people at a local barn and develop some relationships. You might meet someone that is perfect to lease your pony or giant gray horse and then you'll have room and $$ to buy or lease a nice, sane, btdt, type (if you wanted). Do you think the Giant Gray Horse is safe enough for a bouncy experienced, talented teen? Or is he probably only safe enough for a pro? I mean, you could send him out for training again, but my experience is that once you've determined he isn't for you there's no going back. Horses do tend to mature with age though. I had an OTTB like that. He wasn't safe to ride, but was also chronically unsound at a fairly young age, so he retired, but I always felt a little guilty that we didn't have the same connection that I felt with some of my other horses. I was the only mom he ever had though, and I did love him, I just didn't have the same history with him- no years of him saving my butt cross country or anything, instead it was memories of him trying to kill me. Anyways, at least in New England there is a horse shortage right now. I have friends looking and they can't even get to an appointment without the horse being sold. So you might very well find a nice leasor and I've had great experiences with leasing. You have to be careful, but you might really enjoy watching the Giant Gray Horse advance as well.

                          Comment

                            Original Poster

                            #33
                            Originally posted by Ruth0552 View Post
                            Well, if you take some lessons you'll meet some people at a local barn and develop some relationships. You might meet someone that is perfect to lease your pony or giant gray horse and then you'll have room and $$ to buy or lease a nice, sane, btdt, type (if you wanted). Do you think the Giant Gray Horse is safe enough for a bouncy experienced, talented teen? Or is he probably only safe enough for a pro? I mean, you could send him out for training again, but my experience is that once you've determined he isn't for you there's no going back. Horses do tend to mature with age though. I had an OTTB like that. He wasn't safe to ride, but was also chronically unsound at a fairly young age, so he retired, but I always felt a little guilty that we didn't have the same connection that I felt with some of my other horses. I was the only mom he ever had though, and I did love him, I just didn't have the same history with him- no years of him saving my butt cross country or anything, instead it was memories of him trying to kill me. Anyways, at least in New England there is a horse shortage right now. I have friends looking and they can't even get to an appointment without the horse being sold. So you might very well find a nice leasor and I've had great experiences with leasing. You have to be careful, but you might really enjoy watching the Giant Gray Horse advance as well.
                            I have thought about that actually!

                            Back in my teens if somebody had offered me the ride on a 17.2 unicorn of a Sporthouse. I would have been begging every diety in the equestrian universe to be the chosen crash test dummy.

                            I just kind of figured the world had changed.

                            If a youngster wanted to be a trainer someday and wanted a project for their portfolio I would be game. Heck, I would even pay some of the bills. There be rules, like boarded at a barn I approve of, etc.

                            Again, though do teens actually still do that?

                            If he had a season of " I am sticking like glue" I MIGHT have a more sensible horse or they could have some fun until he officially times out and needs to go back to his pasture pouffery.

                            I thought about sending him to a trainer AGAIN, but the cost of training around here for a "might work" for me does not compute. That money is better spent on a down payment on horse who thinks
                            " Don't worry lady, I got this"

                            Comment


                              #34
                              I was in a similar position; I had retired my GP horse, had an interim horse while my talented baby horse was growing up, and that interim horse nearly broke my back in a very similar way ... I had just mounted, put my leg on for a walk depart, and he lost his mind. Fast forward a few years later, and I went back to riding with tremendous anxiety. It was only when I found my current trainer, who has brought my young horse along, that I've found riding to be fun again. I've had to work hard to overcome both difficulties relating to aging (I got serious again when I was 58), but it's been such a joy to have those moments of near perfect. Yes, they are fleeting, but they keep me motivated!

                              I did find another trainer who had a fantastic school horse that helped me regain some confidence. She is a sweetheart (both the horse and that trainer), and it was a very good thing to bring me forward.

                              Comment


                                #35
                                Suzie, that story is hysterical! OP, no advice, but I'm 62 and still riding almost daily when the weather is good. I've never (knock wood) experienced falls like you've described. You've gotten great suggestions, and it seems like you're on a new path. Good luck and keep us posted!

                                Comment


                                  #36
                                  I got a fat safe pony. Im your age, started riding because of my kid about a year ago and do not want injuries.
                                  That pony is the only thing that has gotten me through covid semi-sane.

                                  Comment


                                    #37
                                    Originally posted by SuzieQNutter View Post

                                    I was in the same boat. Grieving over the loss if my mare overnight from colic and Pepper in his 20's. We had bought a farm before she died but hadn't moved in yet.

                                    It was not set up for horses, but cattle and I told hubby being in his 20's Peppy would probably go soon and I would be out of horses.

                                    Non horsey; never been on a horse, hubby, did not give up. We lost her on Father's Day which is in September for us. EVERY. SINGLE. DAY. he brought in ads for horses.

                                    No I don't want another horse. That is the wrong breed, wrong colour, wrong sex, wrong height, wrong discipline, wrong price, wrong age, etc,etc etc

                                    By April I finally figured out that if I did not say yes, he would bring home a horse and I would be the one stuck at home training it, so I may as well get one I liked.

                                    Hubby was chuffed as the next ad he brought was 16.2hh 3yo black/brown tb gelding $800.00.

                                    Nothing in there for me to diss. I said if he has raced I don't want him. He had raced 5 weeks before. Hubby rang off. I rang back and low and behold I bought the most intelligent horse I have ever owned and I had a blast.

                                    The biggest fight I have ever had with hubby happened when he was brought home.

                                    A co-worker said you dont want to ride Pepper he is too old. You want to buy a young one. Get on it at the bottom of a hill. Gallop it to the top and then you can ride.

                                    NOT ON MY WATCH.

                                    I put him on Pepper with the reins on a halter. He was taught how to drop his weight and he turns when you turn your head.

                                    Another fight with hubby. He is going to take Pepper out around the 2,000 acres.

                                    You can't.

                                    Yes I can.

                                    No you can't. You dont know how to trot yet.

                                    So I won't trot.

                                    You don't know that. You are not the boss. Pepper is.

                                    No he isn't.

                                    Oh yes he is.

                                    Plus you will be too sore.

                                    No I won't.

                                    Sigh! You don't know what you dont know and an adult male at the top of his work place actually never hears the word no. Short of hiding saddle and bridle. I am at a loss. So I go with him on the trail ride on the just off the track tb who has now been off the track 6 weeks by the time we picked him up and of course they never changed his feed from him racing.

                                    The first inkling that he was not in charge was asking Pepoer to halt while we were walking in front. Pepper did halt for 0.23 of a second, but he wanted to be in front not halting behind.

                                    I took him on a pretty horizontal, safe track but we ended up down a hill to our gate.

                                    Do you want to go on or go back? This is about 20 minutes!

                                    Home.

                                    No horse can keep up with Pepper on a walk towards home. I told hubby at a dip to shorten his reins, keep him in walk and don't trot. He shortened his reins an inch. Pepper shortened his neck a foot. He went into trot. Hubby grabbed with his legs. I am yelling hands down, take your legs off him. Hubby has his hands up past his ears and won't take his legs off and is in a full gallop for home.

                                    I have gathered up the tb before this happened and bless him he stayed still so not 2 horses racing for home. Believe me Pepper is fast at Pony Club he was nicknamed Speedy Gonzalas!

                                    I continue yelling. At the 90 degree turn to the driveway hubby finally thinks I wonder what will happen if I take my legs off. Pepper stopped.

                                    How the h*ll he didn't fall off I don't know.

                                    Fast forward 10 years. He has built a dressage arena, a tack shed, shelters, paddocks, etc, etc. He owns 2 tbs.

                                    HE CAN NOW RIDE.

                                    He has gone up to ride Sim before he goes to work. I go up in about 10 minutes. I ride Sim and put him away and I now have my own horse. I will ride him and I go to work this afternoon. He comes home from work, rides the other horse and feeds them.

                                    So all you need is someone who you can teach to ride. Problem solved and it does help to keep me motivated as well.
                                    Thank you for posting this wonderful post. I laughed out loud. I cried "Ouch!" in sympathy with your DH. I fell in love with Pepper.
                                    Your post would make a lovely horse novel romance. I hope you have time to write it!
                                    Rack on!

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                                      #38
                                      I used to be sooo serious about horses then life and my own evolution got in the way. Now I have a fantastic 10 year old who still doesn't know his canter leads. I NEVER thought I would be that owner LOL but he's a whale of a trail horse and occasional low level dressage schooling show mount. Yeah, for Intro A and B LOL!

                                      Call the barn that's most promising and go see what you see. Feel what you feel. I took that gelding of mine to a schooling show yesterday and it did my SOUL good to tinker with him and a focus and feel him thinking. I'm coming up on the last days at my job (My role was eliminated) and I'm eagerly thinking about the fact that now I really do have time to ride him while the weather is nice and he's going to learn his canter leads.

                                      You'll be so happy to be in the saddle again on a solid-feeling horse. That will do you good and your instructor will likely love working with you- you have a ton of skills and muscle memory (even if you get sore LOL) to do so many things well. go do it!!

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                                        #39
                                        SuzieQNutter My Dh was a version of the same story - though tamer.
                                        I was a WS, he was my ride home on late nights.
                                        Watching lessons he opined riding "looks like fun" - total City Guy, never even tried livery nose-to-tail trailride.
                                        AND 56yo.
                                        TG, my trainer at the time had a group of his male friends who were also Ground Zero. DH joined their lessons.
                                        He proved to be one of those riders who get along with even the orneriest schoolie.
                                        Bitchmare everyone shuddered when assigned to ride, minced along delicately for him.
                                        OTTB mare who ran away with most, trotted & cantered sedately, even jumped for him < pictorial evidence shows him so far in the backseat he could have been on another horse

                                        Then trainer left for a different state
                                        We had changed barns & after a couple shareboards, DH decided he needed his own horse.
                                        As Luck had it, a former employee of mine was selling her TWH - she had bought horse after unsuccessful attempts to get pregnant.
                                        Guess what worked the Charm?
                                        So sick her 1st trimester she couldn't ride & decided maybe horsekeeping was not in her future.
                                        I did the initial test-ride & found horse clueless (for our purpose) but pleasant & willing.
                                        We were then doing Hunters & seller had just a very deep-footed tanbark roundpen. They put a landscaping timber down & he actually jumped it for me.
                                        DH's test-ride proved horse had very little steering. As they careened toward us, DH pronounced "This is the horse I want!"
                                        So Buddy came to the barn we boarded & I became {shudder} the Trainer.

                                        We were The Bickersons.
                                        "Let go of his face!" < Me
                                        "I'm not holding his face!!" < DH
                                        Etcetera, ad nauseum...
                                        Like your DH, Tom had his own business & ideas about what I could & could not tell him to do on his horse.
                                        I imagine boarders avoided the ring when they saw us approaching...

                                        But we found another trainer who was able to work with all of us & things progressed swimmingly from there.
                                        Trailrides had me on TB, leading, so Tom could get a feel for what really constituted Speed.
                                        As long as his horse did not pass mine, we were okay, he relaxed & we could canter along.
                                        Luckily Buddy did not mind being in back.

                                        We moved barns again to rejoin first trainer & eventually Tom & Buddy not only showed Dressage but Evented - BNR, but schooled to Training at home barn.
                                        Here they are at a Dressage show:



                                        OP:
                                        For me riding took a 20yr hiatus - from age 16 to 35, but when I started again, I never looked back.
                                        At 66 I bought a mini & began Driving.
                                        And when I can dig myself out from beneath car repairs - BOTH daily driver & hauling vehicle in the same year - I will get my Dressage trainer back for our bi-monthly lessons on my riding horse.
                                        *friend of bar.ka*RIP all my lovely boys, gone too soon:
                                        Steppin' Out 1988-2004
                                        Hey Vern! 1982-2009, Cash's Bay Threat 1994-2009
                                        Sam(Jaybee Altair) 1994-2015

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                                          #40
                                          I went back in my 40's after a break and knew I wanted to do it differently. I needed a safe horse who could do a little bit of everything. I reached out to a friend who is a breeder and ended up going to her farm on weekends for 6 months riding a few different horses of hers. I found my safe guy there! When I first bought him people kept asking "what are you going to do with him? hunters? dressage?"etc. I would always respond "I'm going to let him pick". He is now my all star fox hunter and we dabble in schooling shows when we want. Mostly trail ride when we aren't hunting, but also took a few lessons from Anne Kursinski with him this year. I questioned my return to the saddle even after I had bought him for a while, but now it is truly a gift that I gave myself.

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