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"Stallions don't belong at horse shows"

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    #41
    Originally posted by NancyM View Post
    It's good that people who are not experienced handling stallions are frightened of them. It's safer for them to be horrified of being anywhere near a stallion, just in case it's one of THOSE stallions that really shouldn't be out in public. Because there ARE stallions who can be dangerous, and sometimes the people who own them are imbeciles, and their stallions give all stallions a bad rep. Green horses going out in public for the first time often do things that they are not supposed to do... they are green, or young, and inexperienced. If they are a stallion, people are gonna talk. Even if they are not a stallion, people are gonna talk. But if they are a stallion, they are gonna talk more.

    I had a TB stallion that I took to horse shows, and jumping clinics. Most people didn't know he was a stallion, he didn't have a lot of stallion like behaviour. He was well mannered. Bred mares live cover only, of course. But you do have to look out for other horses more so than you do with a gelding, or mare, because a stallion never forgets that he is a stallion. At one little show, another rider came into the warm up ring with her stallion. It was being "wild". My stallion and I left the ring, because one has to look out for things before they are gonna happen. It happened, and the other stallion dumped it's rider, and was running around loose about 5 minutes later. I would have left the ring even if I did not have my stallion there, because one could easily see that it wasn't going to end well. My stallion would stand quietly waiting for his jumping round, other horses around him. He would pick out one mare at each show, usually something flashy, he liked "colour". Something with lots of white, splashy colours. He especially liked pintos, thought they were very attractive, or lots of socks and blazes. He would watch that one mare, quietly, all day long. He would watch her jumping rounds intensely, he would watch her walk by. He ignored every other mare at the show, especially plain coloured mares. Just the one was his chosen love. It would be a different mare at each show. I would know when that mare had come into view, because he would perk his ears up in her direction. Who ever owned the mare he chose never knew, he never said a word. He would just watch, and admire, and wish. Other than that, he was just like any other horse. But not all stallions are like that at horse shows. Have seen a few that have got loose, and run around looking for love. Very dangerous situation when that happens. People are right to be cautious around stallions, because some people do bring badly mannered stallions out in public and have no idea how to look after them and keep themselves and others safe.

    Good luck with your stallion, and the promotion efforts! Knowing that others may well be critical, and knowing that your green horse doesn't need to get run into in the warm up ring, avoid crowded warm up rings. Just wait for a few minutes, to avoid bad situations. Whether your horse is a stallion or a mare or gelding. Crowded warm up rings suck.
    For some reason this is making me sing the old Confederate Railroad song in my head...

    Yeah, and I like my women just a little on the trashy side.
    When they wear their clothes too tight and their hair is dyed.
    Too much lipstick and, ah, too much rouge
    Gets me excited, leaves me feeling confused
    And I like my women just a little on the trashy side.


    Your stallion sounds like a character -- in a good way. And I agree, it's the people you have to watch out for. They can make some bad decisions.
    My hopeful road to the 2021 RRP TB Makeover: https://paradoxfarm.blog/

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      #42
      Originally posted by ParadoxFarm View Post

      For some reason this is making me sing the old Confederate Railroad song in my head...

      Yeah, and I like my women just a little on the trashy side.
      When they wear their clothes too tight and their hair is dyed.
      Too much lipstick and, ah, too much rouge
      Gets me excited, leaves me feeling confused
      And I like my women just a little on the trashy side.


      Your stallion sounds like a character -- in a good way. And I agree, it's the people you have to watch out for. They can make some bad decisions.
      I always said that he preferred coloured women. What can I say... the first love of his life was an appaloosa LOL.
      www.cordovafarm.weebly.com

      Comment


        #43
        Originally posted by BatCoach View Post
        The other bad stallion owner situation is when a machismo man gets a horse and decides that as a manly man, he must ride a stallion. I see this with dog owners too for some reason - as if removing the gonads of their male animals also impacts their own personal gonads? Makes zero sense to me. Anyway, these guys don't care if their horse has poor ground manners or is difficult to handle, they like having something to fight with - it makes them feel more manly. These inexperienced idiots are usually responsible for some weird backyard breeding choices and their poorly trained horses are the ones that give stallions a bad name.
        I had to laugh. You are so right. We had some fool of a man come out to ride the school horses at the local barn and asked for a stallion and announced he would ONLY ride a stallion. He was politely persuaded to leave. And not come back. face palm face palm.....

        "Cats aren't clean; they're covered with cat spit."
        - John S Nichols (1745-1846,writer/printer)

        Don't come for me - I didn't send for you.

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          #44
          My Fjord stallion can be ridden by anyone; man, woman or child. He has been showing since he was 4 and is going strong at age 19. There is no fighting with him; he has a job and he knows what it is. I give a great deal of credit to letting him live as a horse his entire life. He has always lived in a field with mares and foals. He does a good bit of babysitting as the weanlings stay with him at weaning time. He could care less about mares at the horse show. Half the time people don't even notice he is a stallion, much less a regular breeding stallion with 50 foals on the ground.
          Where Norwegian Fjords Rule
          http://www.ironwood-farm.com

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            #45
            Our last stallion preferred to be turned out with the geldings.
            We hand bred early, then turned him out with them later in case some may not have caught earlier.
            The mares were mean to him and, once they were all settled, he would stand by the fence, wanting back with his geldings.
            He then spent the rest of the year with them, including while hand breeding.

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              #46
              One of our Thoroughbred stallions had been going to Pony Club lessons for months with our 14 year old daughter....not a peep or an issue... EVER...until a PC mother noticed his "equipment"...fuzzy balls...and had a fit!! "you never said he was a stallion"!! No... and no one ever noticed or asked!! After siring some really nice "sport" foals, we gelded him and sold him as an "A" show hunter!! "Some" stallions are like that...and those should be breeding...not the raving maniac ones that are dangerous!!
              www.crosscreeksporthorses.com
              Breeders of Painted Thoroughbreds and Uniquely Painted Irish Sport Horses in Northeast Oklahoma

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                #47
                BO hired an "instructor" who fudged her background. She moved her gelding to the farm. BO put him out with the geldings. My horse has always been the alpha. They got organized and ran him out of the field though electric fence in less than an hour. He wasn't an actual gelding, he was an actual cryptorchid. She knew he needed surgery and refused it because it cost the same as dealing with complications in the future. She insisted he had to be turned out with other horses. They left.

                BO bred Gypsies for a few years. She had a terrific stallion. She moved him from his own paddock and turned out with his harem. He was quiet and easy to work with and never showed an inclination to escape.

                Trainer John Lyons said the only difference in training stallions is that it takes about 10 times the number of repetitions.
                "With hardly any other living being can a human connect as closely over so many years as a rider can with her horse." Isabell Werth, Four Legs Move My Soul. 2019

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                  #48
                  We do arabians, and there are junior to ride stallion classes and nobody even thinks about it. My dear friend used to take 2 mares and a stallion to all day tie to your trailer shows. She'd tie the mares on one side, the stud on the other, and there they stayed for 12 hours of showing.
                  http://weanieeventer.blogspot.com/

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                    #49
                    For those debating the ability of stallions to be good citizens, this is a great little story. My print magazine has pictures of him and he is just the sweetest looking old man.
                    http://harnessracingfanzone.com/enchanting/

                    Comment


                      #50
                      Originally posted by Big_Tag View Post
                      For those debating the ability of stallions to be good citizens, this is a great little story. My print magazine has pictures of him and he is just the sweetest looking old man.
                      http://harnessracingfanzone.com/enchanting/
                      That was a really nice story, of a really special horse.

                      Thank you.

                      Comment


                        #51
                        Originally posted by Bluey View Post

                        That was a really nice story, of a really special horse.

                        Thank you.
                        Agreed but I will say having worked at a few breeding establishments in the long ago past, standardbreds included, I found the standardbred breed to have by-and-large the most stoic and level headed individuals regardless of sex. Whether or not it's because of what they're asked to do, their genetics or that so many are owned by individuals and/or family members, small partnerships that often do not have multiple horses so that they get more individualized treatment.....I dunno; but, I wasn't surprised by the story at all. Still proof that testicles and testosterone doesn't have to dictate the behavior.
                        Ranch of Last Resort

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                          #52
                          Originally posted by exvet View Post

                          Agreed but I will say having worked at a few breeding establishments in the long ago past, standardbreds included, I found the standardbred breed to have by-and-large the most stoic and level headed individuals regardless of sex. Whether or not it's because of what they're asked to do, their genetics or that so many are owned by individuals and/or family members, small partnerships that often do not have multiple horses so that they get more individualized treatment.....I dunno; but, I wasn't surprised by the story at all. Still proof that testicles and testosterone doesn't have to dictate the behavior.
                          I agree, having participated in endurance rides, 200 km in two days, twice, on a wonderful big standardbred trotter.
                          She had the most steady, always happy and accommodating mind of any horse I ever rode, a joy to work with.

                          Comment


                            #53
                            I had a cute little plain bay mustang mare that I did lower level eventing with and was usually stalled with my trainer's barn at the venue. I trailered myself as I had an LQ and didn't have to hotel it. However, my trainer's stallion decided my horse was his one true love. How he singled her out I'll never know because she was not in heat, they weren't stalled next to each other, and didn't interact or come into contact at all. He ignored all the other mares at the event, however, when he saw her coming toward our stabling area, he would be whinnying and carrying on and just making a jerk out of himself. He was just gaga over her for some reason. She couldn't care less and ignored him, go figure.

                            Totally agree about Standardbreds. Worked with them a long time ago and love their generally kind nature and try. There was one mare at this farm whom everyone loved and it was always a special occasion when she returned to the farm after the race meet.

                            Comment


                              #54
                              Originally posted by Bluey View Post
                              I agree, having participated in endurance rides, 200 km in two days, twice, on a wonderful big standardbred trotter.
                              She had the most steady, always happy and accommodating mind of any horse I ever rode, a joy to work with.
                              Having been around them since before I could walk, yeah. They are the best. You will have your odd..well..oddball..but generally speaking they are the sanest breed I have ever been around. I can't speak highly enough about them, honestly.

                              Comment


                                #55
                                Stud is the name of a breeding farm, not a stallion.

                                Comment


                                  #56
                                  After i had to put down my beautiful mare, i moved my other horse into her stall at Golden Gate Park Stables, but i had to geld him first. It saddened me immensely to watch his musculature and extreme shine diminish. But he stayed 'fancy' enough to be a nice park horse. I love stallions, they are excitingly beautiful. I currently have none, but that's not to say i won't again someday. Just last week i brought in four more mustangs ...ages 12-13, three of which were all range studs a dozen-ish years until they were captured and gelded... and are now copacetic, civilized, non-combative geldings. Fortunately they get to keep their dense bones, though a lot of their muscles are not as beefy.
                                  Consistency, Insistency, Persistency

                                  Comment


                                    #57
                                    Late to this thread, but it seems the title should be "People who don't know how to manage stallions should not be at horse shows".

                                    Comment


                                      #58
                                      Originally posted by rubygirl1968 View Post
                                      Something just popped up on my Facebook page last night from a trainer saying don't own a stallion if you're not ready to knock a horse to it's knees.
                                      If I ever did that to my stallion he'd lay down and die.
                                      "It's like a Russian nesting doll of train wrecks."--CaitlinandTheBay

                                      ...just settin' on the Group W bench.

                                      Comment


                                        #59
                                        Originally posted by Big_Tag View Post

                                        Having been around them since before I could walk, yeah. They are the best. You will have your odd..well..oddball..but generally speaking they are the sanest breed I have ever been around. I can't speak highly enough about them, honestly.
                                        The most notorious "oddball" among them would undoubtedly have to be Nevele Pride! The only person Pride liked was his groom, and even he had to keep his guard up.

                                        Comment


                                          #60
                                          Originally posted by Ghazzu View Post

                                          If I ever did that to my stallion he'd lay down and die.
                                          I don't agree with it. The only time I've ever even been around a stallion is when I interviewed to volunteer at a barn and they boarded a stallion. He was kept in a stall 24/7, all parts of the door closed and enclosed sides.

                                          I felt quite sorry for him. I never went back, they said you had to watch him or he would attack and I didn't feel safe. I had even less experience than I do now.

                                          I remember thinking he might not be as unhappy if he got to live like a horse.

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