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Those moments that make your heart jump..

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    #41
    When you find a pipe gate with all the pipes bent to create a gaping hole in the middle, then find the horse who seems to have kicked both legs through the gate. I found her with the hair skinned off from stifle to nearly the ground, just a little swelling, but no blood. I assumed both legs were broken at that point, but I asked her to move and she's perfectly sound. I did not make an emergency vet call but decided to reevaluate in the morning. She was fine in the morning, and nothing happened other than getting hair scraped off and some scabby skin on her legs, and a conveniently human-sized hole in the gate.

    Also, probably my first time with that feeling: I was 10 years old and left in charge of doing the chores for the evening at the riding stable next door. I was the only one on site (yeah, smart) and had probably 15 horses to bring in and feed. One was missing. In a panic, I hopped on a pony and searched everywhere for him in the large pasture full of trees, briars, and hills, but couldn't find him. I looked in other fields, I checked all the fences. I may have even looked on the trails, but never found him. I didn't have any way to contact the owner/BM who was away for the day. Finally, they return home, WITH THE HORSE. They weren't supposed to take him, but plans changed and no one thought to tell me.

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      #42
      Every single autumn when I switch the horses from night turnout to day turnout, I walk out that first morning and d^mn near panic because all the paddocks are empty and the gates are standing open. Every year. Duh.

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        #43
        I have two.

        Going into a reasonably sized paddock to get my mare with a few other horses in the paddock along with a round bale. One of the horses I didn't know. He decided he wanted to kill me chased me around the round bale a few times. I really was in fear for my life. Finally got him on the far side of the round bale from where the closest fence was and I hot footed it up and over the pole fence before he got to me. Turns out he was known for this (grrrrrr). Barn finally asked for him to be moved some place other than this barn.

        Second time was about 2 weeks after my mare (same one) had 2 colic surgeries within 36 hours for an impaction. She had a bit of a rough recovery getting her gut motility going again. I got to the hospital on a Saturday and she is flat out on her side . She wouldn't even eat the baby carrots I put in her mouth and she loved baby carrots. Wouldn't pick up her head, wouldn't go sternal. Her surgeon saw my car and came out to talk to me. We had "that" talk. He appreciated knowing my feelings about ending the fight or not. He said wait. She was like that for close to 24 hours. Got up and never looked back. Lost her a few years ago due to the 'infirmities' of old age at about 28. I'll never forget Shane Miller DVM.
        Oh, I have slipped the surly bonds of earth, And danced the skies on laughter-silvered wings; John Gilliespie Magee, Jr

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          #44
          Late at night mare spiked a bit of a fever, so vet (over phone) said give banamine. She had a terrible reaction to it. Could not breathe, throat closing. Called vet, held phone up to her throat so he could hear noises she was making. He said he was on the way, but if she went down before she got there we would need to do an emergency tracheotomy. Get a sharp knife. Feel the throat cartilage and cut through. Don't go to either side or you will get her carotids or jugulars. There may have been more instructions, but I can't remember them.

          She was gasping and shaking. We had the knife, kept saying if she does down we do it. Somehow we do it. Vet broke the land speed record getting to the barn, came flying down the driveway, leaped out of truck with a scalpel, made the necessary cut immediately. Mare took the longest deepest breath I have ever heard. She was OK, and we were able to close the trach up in a couple of weeks.

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            #45
            When your horse decides halfway into his stall to spin and bolt out the barn door. And his friend follows. And they cross the road. And they bust the neighbor's fence into the cattle pasture. And gallop off over the hill into the fog.


            This was my morning today before work.

            I owe the neighbor some insulators and a baked good.

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              #46
              When your young student's normally calm new horse is loaded in the slant load trailer for the first show of the season and instantly becomes a nervous, claustrophobic wreck and starts to make that move to jump out of the drop down window and you are 50 ' away run walking over trying not to panic the horse or panic the young girl and her parents.

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                #47
                When the tail tucks, back end drops, and the 5th (6th? 7th?) gear kicks in... Oh and there's a dog chasing you.

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                  #48
                  When you are trail riding along alone, relaxed, loose reins, feet out of the stirrups and your horse sees a guy with a sign or white board (too far to see properly but the boy thinks whatever it is eats horses) spins around and goes into the gallop of the century, like a runaway train and with the bit clenched firmly in his mouth. My only option is to hang on until he runs himself tired - took at least a half mile, no exaggeration (and then muster up the strength to take him back to a gated arena and run the crap out of him some more as punishment). My body was sore all over for two days and he no longer wears a snaffle. He now works in a Kimberwicke he doesn't like, but I tell him it's his own fault. I think he gave me some grey hairs too that day. I will never drop my feet out of the stirrups again on the trail either!

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                    #49
                    Originally posted by skydy View Post
                    I'll never forget the horror of watching her, calmly but swiftly sliding by, while I hoped against hope that there were no protuberances in the ground that would tear her open.
                    Is it wrong that I'm laughing right now?

                    One of the best life lessons I have gotten from horses is to know when all you can do is Get Out Of The Way and wait until the shit show stops. You may think or say, "Whoa....." to yourself in a calm voice while it's happening. The even more experienced among us say "Whoa...." while thinking "This could end badly" and hoping it's funny or lucky rather than with all the blood on the outside of the body rather than the inside.

                    A very good lesson to learn watching horses try to die (from a safe distance) because it involves you viscerally. You get to try to be calm while your adrenaline is high. It's also really good to know when you can't help by getting physically closer. I remember being yelled at as a kid about staying out of the way when things went bad with a big, small-brained flight animal.

                    So, so, so many co-dependent people would be helped by this kind of Horse Crisis Therapy.
                    The armchair saddler
                    Politically Pro-Cat

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                      #50
                      Originally posted by Seagram View Post
                      Waking up in the morning to go feed the horses, and realizing that they are no longer in their paddock. Running down my lane onto my country road with halters and leads in hand, a truck drives by with two guys, who stop hard. Seeing my halters, they ask if I've lost a couple horses! They tell me to hop in, they'll take me down the road to them. I don't even question it for a second, hop in the truck and we head down the road. We get to where my two buttheads are hanging out in someone's front yard, just munching away on some yummy grass, with a small fan club of onlookers. Never had such an adrenaline rush! And met some very nice people that day!!
                      That would have been one of the BEST "How mom n dad met" stories if it had turned out that way lolol.

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                        #51
                        Originally posted by mvp View Post

                        Is it wrong that I'm laughing right now?

                        One of the best life lessons I have gotten from horses is to know when all you can do is Get Out Of The Way and wait until the shit show stops. You may think or say, "Whoa....." to yourself in a calm voice while it's happening. The even more experienced among us say "Whoa...." while thinking "This could end badly" and hoping it's funny or lucky rather than with all the blood on the outside of the body rather than the inside.

                        A very good lesson to learn watching horses try to die (from a safe distance) because it involves you viscerally. You get to try to be calm while your adrenaline is high. It's also really good to know when you can't help by getting physically closer. I remember being yelled at as a kid about staying out of the way when things went bad with a big, small-brained flight animal.

                        So, so, so many co-dependent people would be helped by this kind of Horse Crisis Therapy.
                        No, I laugh too when I remember the big grey blob whooshing (calmly) by. It's just not something you see very often.

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                          #52
                          I’ve got a few.

                          1. When someone falls off less than a second before someone else opens the top door to leave the arena. Then horse decides to jump out. Luckily the person jumped out of the way, horse landed on his feet, and went to his stall.

                          2. When you’re riding your horse bareback in from the field along a ridge, and when you look over the ridge you can just see the top of a black bear heading the opposite direction. I almost fell off assuming that my horse had seen him too, luckily he was too busy trying to grab mouthfuls of grass.

                          3. When you spend an extra month doing groundwork with your reactive 3yo chestnut mare before backing her, lunging her with a dummy and weights, only to have two f****** cats come screaming and hissing out of the barn literally as you get on for the first time. She was so terrified that she fell backing away from them resulting in me with a sore shoulder. This was Wednesday. Luckily she didn’t associate the scary cats with a rider and now she has three successful rides under her belt.

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                            #53
                            When you are driving home from a horse show. It's 95 deg. The show had gone badly. You are a quarter of a mile from home and you look behind you and see your horse FALL OUT OF THE TRAILER through the people door!!!! Luckily I was only going 25 mph. About a half a mile from home I had felt a small bump. I look behind me and I see the front window broken but don't feel anything funny (like a scrambling horse over the chest bar). In hindsight, I should have stopped, but I was exhausted, grumpy from the bad show, and just wanted to get home, which was literally only 8 min away. Since the barn was so close, I had a lot of help getting him and my rig home. Vet dropped everything she was doing and met us at the barn. That saint of a horse got in another trailer to get home and thankfully had only a few lacerations and bruises. A trailer camera is in my future.

                            Comment


                              #54
                              Some of these are hysterical - after the fact! Waking up in the middle of the night and thinking anyone is loose. I now live fairly close to an occasionally busy road. Truly instantly heart-pounding.

                              Comment


                                #55
                                Originally posted by xQHDQ View Post
                                When you are driving home from a horse show. It's 95 deg. The show had gone badly. You are a quarter of a mile from home and you look behind you and see your horse FALL OUT OF THE TRAILER through the people door!!!! Luckily I was only going 25 mph. About a half a mile from home I had felt a small bump. I look behind me and I see the front window broken but don't feel anything funny (like a scrambling horse over the chest bar). In hindsight, I should have stopped, but I was exhausted, grumpy from the bad show, and just wanted to get home, which was literally only 8 min away. Since the barn was so close, I had a lot of help getting him and my rig home. Vet dropped everything she was doing and met us at the barn. That saint of a horse got in another trailer to get home and thankfully had only a few lacerations and bruises. A trailer camera is in my future.
                                This is one of those NOT funny. Wow!

                                Comment


                                  #56
                                  Looked outside to see our pony laying on the ground underneath his Thoroughbred friend which was weird enough. A split second later realized that pony's back foot was caught in the belly straps on the Tbred's blanket. I was holding another horse and in the seconds it took me to safely secure him and run outside they managed to disentangle themselves. The pony did get dragged a tiny bit because his pal was understandably freaked. Scared the absolute **** out of me because all I could picture was the Tbred bolting in fear with pony attached. Still don't know how they managed to get themselves in that situation. They were both completely fine other than the Tbred being a bit rattled (the pony didn't seem phased lol).

                                  Comment


                                    #57
                                    Wow, there are some heart-stopping stories there!

                                    Over my many horse riding / ownership years I've had so many of those moments I could write a book.
                                    Just yesterday, trotting my 22 yo Tb all over the xc field, she trotted very politely and smoothly down a bank, took one canter stride on landing and stumbled badly. I really thought we were going down, hard. But somehow she got her feet under her just in time for the other bank down into the water jump, which she did perfectly.

                                    Another one, that lasted many minutes, heart-in-throat moment, riding in the mountains, on a green horse, during a several day trek, many years ago. I was in the lead, and the path turned into a rocky, mountain goat trail, high on a ridge literally no wider than 2 horse's hooves. Steep drops on either side. I kept thinking, if he spooks at anything and tries to turn around, we are DEAD. He didn't. Earned his trekking stars that day.
                                    Ottbs - The finish line is only the beginning!

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                                      #58
                                      I was 13 and that summer an arabian breeder had sent us several colts to start.
                                      I was assigned this super sweet brown fuzzy Teddy Bear.
                                      I think both of us fell in love with each other.
                                      Taught him tricks, rode him all over and went on every trail ride group.
                                      After some weeks, we were on this trail ride and came to a training slide.
                                      The ground was a maybe 30 yard dirt and gravel steep slope.
                                      We would ride those with the military soldiers and you were to lean forward and keep your horse straight.
                                      Horses would sit on their haunches and walk in front and slide all the way down.

                                      My little colt was not so sure he wanted to try that, started correctly and then got sideways, tried to hurry and went head over kettle.
                                      First roll, he went right over me and I was sliding after that right behind him, but hit a little bush and that stopped me.
                                      I sat back up and slid the rest of the way on my bottom, chasing after him, hoping he was not dead when he landed in the bottom.
                                      He just stood up, shook and waited on me.

                                      I walked him around a bit, he seemed fine, not a scratch on him, or on me.
                                      It did break the tree in my very old English saddle.

                                      Comment


                                        #59
                                        Originally posted by Bluey View Post
                                        I was 13 and that summer an arabian breeder had sent us several colts to start.
                                        I was assigned this super sweet brown fuzzy Teddy Bear.
                                        I think both of us fell in love with each other.
                                        Taught him tricks, rode him all over and went on every trail ride group.
                                        After some weeks, we were on this trail ride and came to a training slide.
                                        The ground was a maybe 30 yard dirt and gravel steep slope.
                                        We would ride those with the military soldiers and you were to lean forward and keep your horse straight.
                                        Horses would sit on their haunches and walk in front and slide all the way down.

                                        My little colt was not so sure he wanted to try that, started correctly and then got sideways, tried to hurry and went head over kettle.
                                        First roll, he went right over me and I was sliding after that right behind him, but hit a little bush and that stopped me.
                                        I sat back up and slid the rest of the way on my bottom, chasing after him, hoping he was not dead when he landed in the bottom.
                                        He just stood up, shook and waited on me.

                                        I walked him around a bit, he seemed fine, not a scratch on him, or on me.
                                        It did break the tree in my very old English saddle.
                                        OMG Tell me you never tried again. If you did you are braver than me. I never want to try it after reading that.
                                        It is better to ride 5 minutes a day than it is to ride 35 minutes on a Sunday.

                                        Comment


                                          #60
                                          Originally posted by SuzieQNutter View Post

                                          OMG Tell me you never tried again. If you did you are braver than me. I never want to try it after reading that.
                                          Oh, yes, we rode down those all the time.
                                          The one in my story with the colt was not as steep as these ones, that are more advanced training slides.
                                          It was maybe a bit longer and smooth all the way down:



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