Announcement

Collapse

Forum rules and no-advertising policy

As a participant on this forum, it is your responsibility to know and follow our rules. Please read this message in its entirety.

Board Rules

1. You're responsible for what you say.
As outlined in Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act, The Chronicle of the Horse and its affiliates, as well Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd., the developers of vBulletin, are not legally responsible for statements made in the Forums.

This is a public forum viewed by a wide spectrum of people, so please be mindful of what you say and who might be reading it--details of personal disputes may be better handled privately. While posters are legally responsible for their statements, the moderators may in their discretion remove or edit posts, though are not legally obligated to do so, regardless of content.

Users have the ability to modify or delete their own messages after posting. Moderators generally will not delete posts, threads or accounts unless they have been alerted and have determined that a post, thread or user has violated the Forums' policies. Moderators do not regularly independently monitor the Forums for such violations.

Profanity, outright vulgarity, blatant personal insults or otherwise inappropriate statements will not be tolerated and will be dealt with at the discretion of the moderators.

Users may provide their positive or negative experiences with or opinions of companies, products, individuals, etc.; however, accounts involving allegations of criminal behavior against named individuals or companies MUST be first-hand accounts and may NOT be made anonymously.

If a situation has been reported upon by a reputable news source or addressed by law enforcement or the legal system it is open for discussion, but if an individual wants to make their own claims of criminal behavior against a named party in the course of that discussion, they too must identify themselves by first and last name and the account must be first-person.

Criminal allegations that do not satisfy these requirements, when brought to our attention, may be removed pending satisfaction of these criteria, and we reserve the right to err on the side of caution when making these determinations.

Credible threats of suicide will be reported to the police along with identifying user information at our disposal, in addition to referring the user to suicide helpline resources such as 1-800-SUICIDE or 1-800-273-TALK.

2. Conversations in horse-related forums should be horse-related.
The forums are a wonderful source of information and support for members of the horse community. While it's understandably tempting to share information or search for input on other topics upon which members might have a similar level of knowledge, members must maintain the focus on horses.

3. Keep conversations productive, on topic and civil.
Discussion and disagreement are inevitable and encouraged; personal insults, diatribes and sniping comments are unproductive and unacceptable. Whether a subject is light-hearted or serious, keep posts focused on the current topic and of general interest to other participants of that thread. Utilize the private message feature or personal email where appropriate to address side topics or personal issues not related to the topic at large.

4. No advertising in the discussion forums.
Posts in the discussion forums directly or indirectly advertising horses, jobs, items or services for sale or wanted will be removed at the discretion of the moderators. Use of the private messaging feature or email addresses obtained through users' profiles for unsolicited advertising is not permitted.

Company representatives may participate in discussions and answer questions about their products or services, or suggest their products on recent threads if they fulfill the criteria of a query. False "testimonials" provided by company affiliates posing as general consumers are not appropriate, and self-promotion of sales, ad campaigns, etc. through the discussion forums is not allowed.

Paid advertising is available on our classifieds site and through the purchase of banner ads. The tightly monitored Giveaways forum permits free listings of genuinely free horses and items available or wanted (on a limited basis). Items offered for trade are not allowed.

Advertising Policy Specifics
When in doubt of whether something you want to post constitutes advertising, please contact a moderator privately in advance for further clarification. Refer to the following points for general guidelines:

Horses -- Only general discussion about the buying, leasing, selling and pricing of horses is permitted. If the post contains, or links to, the type of specific information typically found in a sales or wanted ad, and it's related to a horse for sale, regardless of who's selling it, it doesn't belong in the discussion forums.

Stallions -- Board members may ask for suggestions on breeding stallion recommendations. Stallion owners may reply to such queries by suggesting their own stallions, only if their horse fits the specific criteria of the original poster. Excessive promotion of a stallion by its owner or related parties is not permitted and will be addressed at the discretion of the moderators.

Services -- Members may use the forums to ask for general recommendations of trainers, barns, shippers, farriers, etc., and other members may answer those requests by suggesting themselves or their company, if their services fulfill the specific criteria of the original post. Members may not solicit other members for business if it is not in response to a direct, genuine query.

Products -- While members may ask for general opinions and suggestions on equipment, trailers, trucks, etc., they may not list the specific attributes for which they are in the market, as such posts serve as wanted ads.

Event Announcements -- Members may post one notification of an upcoming event that may be of interest to fellow members, if the original poster does not benefit financially from the event. Such threads may not be "bumped" excessively. Premium members may post their own notices in the Event Announcements forum.

Charities/Rescues -- Announcements for charitable or fundraising events can only be made for 501(c)(3) tax-exempt organizations. Special exceptions may be made, at the moderators' discretion and direction, for board-related events or fundraising activities in extraordinary circumstances.

Occasional posts regarding horses available for adoption through IRS-registered horse rescue or placement programs are permitted in the appropriate forums, but these threads may be limited at the discretion of the moderators. Individuals may not advertise or make announcements for horses in need of rescue, placement or adoption unless the horse is available through a recognized rescue or placement agency or government-run entity or the thread fits the criteria for and is located in the Giveaways forum.

5. Do not post copyrighted photographs unless you have purchased that photo and have permission to do so.

6. Respect other members.
As members are often passionate about their beliefs and intentions can easily be misinterpreted in this type of environment, try to explore or resolve the inevitable disagreements that arise in the course of threads calmly and rationally.

If you see a post that you feel violates the rules of the board, please click the �alert� button (exclamation point inside of a triangle) in the bottom left corner of the post, which will alert ONLY the moderators to the post in question. They will then take whatever action, or no action, as deemed appropriate for the situation at their discretion. Do not air grievances regarding other posters or the moderators in the discussion forums.

Please be advised that adding another user to your �Ignore� list via your User Control Panel can be a useful tactic, which blocks posts and private messages by members whose commentary you'd rather avoid reading.

7. We have the right to reproduce statements made in the forums.
The Chronicle of the Horse may copy, quote, link to or otherwise reproduce posts, or portions of posts, in print or online for advertising or editorial purposes, if attributed to their original authors, and by posting in this forum, you hereby grant to The Chronicle of the Horse a perpetual, non-exclusive license under copyright and other rights, to do so.

8. We reserve the right to enforce and amend the rules.
The moderators may delete, edit, move or close any post or thread at any time, or refrain from doing any of the foregoing, in their discretion, and may suspend or revoke a user's membership privileges at any time to maintain adherence to the rules and the general spirit of the forum. These rules may be amended at any time to address the current needs of the board.

Please see our full Terms of Service and Privacy Policy for more information.

Thanks for being a part of the COTH forums!

(Revised 5/9/18)
See more
See less

Hauling two weanlings across country - any tips welcome!

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

    Hauling two weanlings across country - any tips welcome!


    Hello all!

    I am looking for some input on foal hauling cross country. I have a foal in-utero I have purchased in North Carolina (I am in Colorado), and will be bringing the little one home late September next fall after they are weaned. I already have found someone else in CO who is also getting a foal from NC or FL at the same time and we were hoping to collaborate shipping the babies together for companionship.

    My question is this. I plan to haul the foals myself, rather than use a professional shipper, but am wanting to make sure I do what is best for the little ones. I have a new, fully enclosed 2-horse warmblood trailer with a ramp. The dividers can all be taken out so there is nothing in the trailer and it is a very large box stall (8x10) with no hardware in there. I would cover any sharp areas (still need to figure out what to cover hardware with that foals wouldn’t eat), the trailer would be bedded very deeply (though I would love opinions on straw vs shavings), and the babies would be loose in the trailer with lots of hay on the ground to nibble on and water secured safely.

    I did have a couple questions I would love advice on. The trip is 1600 miles, and we would stop for two nights. Do you unload the foals overnight or just let them stay in the trailer? Also do you have water in the trailer while hauling or just offer it when you stop? How often would you stop and for how long?

    A big question I have is if it is safe to have the two foals loose together in the trailer? It’s certainly big enough (the stall is a roomy 8x10, same size as professional hauler's box stalls such as Brookledge and even bigger than some) and is big enough for two weanlings to stretch out fully) and they’d know each other before the trip. They will both be well-handled, will have been taught to load, lead, etc. I will also have a camera in the trailer to monitor them, fans as needed, and the trailer is very well ventilated.

    Any advice from those who have made a trip like this with weanlings?

    Also as a note, I have looked at professional hauling. I have been quoted $3000 as a base price at the lowest, and all expenses included the trip will be no more than $1.5K if I haul myself. I will have other horse experienced people with me on the trip to help with the foals and any unexpected events. I have extensive experience handling and working with foals, but just have never hauled them on more than short trips.

    Thanks in advance for any tips!
    Last edited by tessasereyna; Jun. 22, 2020, 11:45 PM.

    #2
    We hauled our weanlings in a stock trailer. 18ft on the floor, made into 2 box stalls. One stall 8ft x 6ft wide, the other was 10ft x 6ft. We covered the slats with plywood to prevent cold winds on them. It was not hard, cut plywood to fit, round head bolts on the inside to hold in place. Trailer has rubber mats, we bedded deep with sawdust, 8 inches at least. Straw is pretty slippery in a trailer. I had a horse go down on straw in the trailer!! Never did straw bedding again in a trailer. Sawdust is much more absorbent, good cushioning under them standing or laying down. You may want to sprinkle some water on it to prevent dust as they move around.

    We also hauled water in big 5 gallon bottles, to make sure we could give drinks easily. Can be hard to get decent water at rest stops. We hung hay bags by BOTH ends, up high, so as hay got eaten they did not sag low enough that catch a hoof. Small, 2" holes in hay nets, which allows eating but lots less mess or waste. We got (bought) a few extra hay bales from seller to prevent sudden food change using our hay.

    We hauled a muck tub, forked out manure as it accumulated. With such a long trip that will be needed. And you will need to replace sawdust too, so some bales need to be packed along.

    We removed halters during travel to prevent getting hung on anything. Two people everytime we opened and shut the trailer doors, to prevent accidental escapes. One person going in, one managing the door. ALWAYS!!

    We stopped about every 3 hours for us, then checked colts to offer drinks, check haybags. They drank every time, so I would not consider longer travel times between stops. Need to keep them hydrated!! No grain offered, did not need it during travel. Hay is more beneficial. We ate sit down meals, letting them rest from moving. Lots of times we returned to find them laying down, as well as laying down while traveling. They had sawdust on them, on one side when we checked at stops. We also stopped at truck stops for sleeping in the truck. Flying Js have monitored parking lots. Also Walmart stores. They sell a book called Next Exit, for truckers, that tell what can be found at every exit. Phones are great, but if reception os bad, you have no information. Books always work! Ha ha

    There is also a Horse Motel or Hotel site, for places to stop with horses. You may want to layover a night or two, put the Colts in stalls, rent yourself a room to get some good sleep, before going on. Have your paperwork in order, Coggins, Health Certificates, for crossing state lines. States differ, but horse trailers USED to have to stop at weigh stations, my friend ran into that years ago. She was helping a friend move furniture in a stock trailer. They got chased down by police, had to go back to over the scale! Anyway story always stuck in my head as "odd and different" from what Michigan does.

    Pack some baby size blankets for " just in case" you run into cold. We had to blanket our weanlings with a surprise cold front and snowstorm on the way home!! We also got snow in late May bringing a horse north from Louisiana! He needed a blanket, had no hair coat coming from 80F!

    I really think 2 weanlings in a 2H Trailer is one colt too many. That really is not much room, even with divider out. They will have a hard time laying down full out, as foals do in that small space together. Foals lay down a LOT, which is easier on them while traveling anyway. And they reach a point in fatigue, when they MUST lay down, legs just can't stay up any longer.

    if you borrow or rent a trailer, have it serviced before leaving. Brakes checked, wheels greased, lights working with YOUR truck. Good spare tire, jack or Trail Aid wheel block for changing a tire. Wrench that fits the lugs. Are tires in good shape with decent amount of tread and uncracked sidewalls, shackles underneath solid? I mention the shackles on axles, springs, because ours broke just before a planned outing, We noticed 2 tires were MUCH too close together!! Stayed home that day! Trailer is old but solid, the shackles just had worn out. Trailer fixer ordered parts, replaced and repaired everything. Actually glad it happened, because 3 weeks later we were heading to Virginia to get our new weanling! Being broken with baby would have been BAD! Parts took a while to get in, not a shelf item, so we would have been stuck days!! With getting trailer serviced, you have peace of mind. The couple times we borrowed a trailer, something ALWAYS went wrong. Funny how other folks are not diligent on upkeep! Now Husband always checks them over now, before leaving the farm. No grease in wheels is a big one, you will blow a bearing. Other things on same trailer were bad tires, not enough air in the good tires, brakes not working, worn wire shorting out lights. We paid to fix things, worth being able to borrow the trailer. Just glad we fixed it before use, had no issues on the road.

    Comment


      #3
      No way I would ever do that long of a trip with a weanling. I would find an air ride van with a reputable company with a relatively direct route.
      McDowell Racing Stables

      Home Away From Home

      Comment


        #4
        I'd call Brookledge. I wouldn't chance hauling with the babies if not super experienced.
        "Anyone who tries to make brownies without butter should be arrested." Ina Garten

        Comment


          #5
          I hauled my mare and her 3 month old mule foal in the front part of my 16 foot stock trailer. My other horse was in the back part. The mare was tied, but the foal was loose and did just fine. It was a 16 hour trip that we did in 2 days , stopping overnight. I would most definitely get them off the trailer and into a safe large paddock for overnight stabling.

          My foal did NOT want to get back on the next day, but I contribute that to his being a mule!

          I would haul your 2 together, loose in the trailer with all the dividers out or try to get a stock trailer and haul 1 in the front and 1 in the back if you can .

          Comment

            Original Poster

            #6
            Originally posted by goodhors View Post
            We hauled our weanlings in a stock trailer. 18ft on the floor, made into 2 box stalls. One stall 8ft x 6ft wide, the other was 10ft x 6ft. We covered the slats with plywood to prevent cold winds on them. It was not hard, cut plywood to fit, round head bolts on the inside to hold in place. Trailer has rubber mats, we bedded deep with sawdust, 8 inches at least. Straw is pretty slippery in a trailer. I had a horse go down on straw in the trailer!! Never did straw bedding again in a trailer. Sawdust is much more absorbent, good cushioning under them standing or laying down. You may want to sprinkle some water on it to prevent dust as they move around.

            We also hauled water in big 5 gallon bottles, to make sure we could give drinks easily. Can be hard to get decent water at rest stops. We hung hay bags by BOTH ends, up high, so as hay got eaten they did not sag low enough that catch a hoof. Small, 2" holes in hay nets, which allows eating but lots less mess or waste. We got (bought) a few extra hay bales from seller to prevent sudden food change using our hay.

            We hauled a muck tub, forked out manure as it accumulated. With such a long trip that will be needed. And you will need to replace sawdust too, so some bales need to be packed along.

            We removed halters during travel to prevent getting hung on anything. Two people everytime we opened and shut the trailer doors, to prevent accidental escapes. One person going in, one managing the door. ALWAYS!!

            We stopped about every 3 hours for us, then checked colts to offer drinks, check haybags. They drank every time, so I would not consider longer travel times between stops. Need to keep them hydrated!! No grain offered, did not need it during travel. Hay is more beneficial. We ate sit down meals, letting them rest from moving. Lots of times we returned to find them laying down, as well as laying down while traveling. They had sawdust on them, on one side when we checked at stops. We also stopped at truck stops for sleeping in the truck. Flying Js have monitored parking lots. Also Walmart stores. They sell a book called Next Exit, for truckers, that tell what can be found at every exit. Phones are great, but if reception os bad, you have no information. Books always work! Ha ha

            There is also a Horse Motel or Hotel site, for places to stop with horses. You may want to layover a night or two, put the Colts in stalls, rent yourself a room to get some good sleep, before going on. Have your paperwork in order, Coggins, Health Certificates, for crossing state lines. States differ, but horse trailers USED to have to stop at weigh stations, my friend ran into that years ago. She was helping a friend move furniture in a stock trailer. They got chased down by police, had to go back to over the scale! Anyway story always stuck in my head as "odd and different" from what Michigan does.

            Pack some baby size blankets for " just in case" you run into cold. We had to blanket our weanlings with a surprise cold front and snowstorm on the way home!! We also got snow in late May bringing a horse north from Louisiana! He needed a blanket, had no hair coat coming from 80F!

            I really think 2 weanlings in a 2H Trailer is one colt too many. That really is not much room, even with divider out. They will have a hard time laying down full out, as foals do in that small space together. Foals lay down a LOT, which is easier on them while traveling anyway. And they reach a point in fatigue, when they MUST lay down, legs just can't stay up any longer.

            if you borrow or rent a trailer, have it serviced before leaving. Brakes checked, wheels greased, lights working with YOUR truck. Good spare tire, jack or Trail Aid wheel block for changing a tire. Wrench that fits the lugs. Are tires in good shape with decent amount of tread and uncracked sidewalls, shackles underneath solid? I mention the shackles on axles, springs, because ours broke just before a planned outing, We noticed 2 tires were MUCH too close together!! Stayed home that day! Trailer is old but solid, the shackles just had worn out. Trailer fixer ordered parts, replaced and repaired everything. Actually glad it happened, because 3 weeks later we were heading to Virginia to get our new weanling! Being broken with baby would have been BAD! Parts took a while to get in, not a shelf item, so we would have been stuck days!! With getting trailer serviced, you have peace of mind. The couple times we borrowed a trailer, something ALWAYS went wrong. Funny how other folks are not diligent on upkeep! Now Husband always checks them over now, before leaving the farm. No grease in wheels is a big one, you will blow a bearing. Other things on same trailer were bad tires, not enough air in the good tires, brakes not working, worn wire shorting out lights. We paid to fix things, worth being able to borrow the trailer. Just glad we fixed it before use, had no issues on the road.
            Thank you so much for the details and for the suggestions! As for size the trailer is 8x10 with dividers out - this is the size of a Brookledge stall and they put two weanlings together in their box stalls on many trips. So I am not too concerned about the size. It really is a big space. But I will certainly keep in mind all your other suggestions.

            Comment


              #7
              Originally posted by luvmyhackney View Post
              I'd call Brookledge. I wouldn't chance hauling with the babies if not super experienced.
              Me too. I'd call Brookledge. I wouldn't do that haul myself, even if I was moving a couch.

              Comment


                #8
                An 8x10ft stall will probably work for 2 weanlings. I was presuming a much smaller space with the divider out. Our weanlings are rather large at six months when we picked them up, so I want them to have plenty of room. Your weanlings may be younger, smaller creatures.

                You will want the farm to load and unload the babies a few times before pickup, to make things easier when you get there. We also asked sellers to lay blankets on them, girth them, lead foals around "dressed" in case we had to put blankets on them. I made a couple wide elastic girths that worked well holding blankets on. Blanket girths would not shorten or lengthen any more for a snug fit. Sure don't want foats getting a hoof in loose girths!

                Have duct tape in your spare equipment, never know when it will be handy!! Best of luck getting them home safely.

                Are you able to refuse to buy if foal is unsound? Obviously crooked legs, deformities and not passing Vet inspection for eyes, lungs, heart checks. Can't do a lot in soundness checking at such young ages, but I defiantly would get get those things Vet checked before paying foal off. We did, to prevent future heartbreak when horse went to work. Farm had no problem with that Vetting, extra handling, because they handle the foals daily anyway. . However we were buying foals on the ground, not a "custom order" foal.

                Comment

                  Original Poster

                  #9
                  Originally posted by freshman View Post

                  Me too. I'd call Brookledge. I wouldn't do that haul myself, even if I was moving a couch.
                  I've done plenty of cross country road trips with and without a trailer, as have the people I will be driving with. We are all experienced haulers and used to driving long distances. I just had never done it with a foal so was wanting tips on any differences with hauling foals vs. adults. We have a route planned and already have overnights planned. The only difference of us vs. a professional hauler is the air-ride in the trailer and the cost. Our trip would be more direct as well.

                  Comment

                    Original Poster

                    #10
                    Originally posted by goodhors View Post
                    An 8x10ft stall will probably work for 2 weanlings. I was presuming a much smaller space with the divider out. Our weanlings are rather large at six months when we picked them up, so I want them to have plenty of room. Your weanlings may be younger, smaller creatures.

                    You will want the farm to load and unload the babies a few times before pickup, to make things easier when you get there. We also asked sellers to lay blankets on them, girth them, lead foals around "dressed" in case we had to put blankets on them. I made a couple wide elastic girths that worked well holding blankets on. Blanket girths would not shorten or lengthen any more for a snug fit. Sure don't want foats getting a hoof in loose girths!

                    Have duct tape in your spare equipment, never know when it will be handy!! Best of luck getting them home safely.

                    Are you able to refuse to buy if foal is unsound? Obviously crooked legs, deformities and not passing Vet inspection for eyes, lungs, heart checks. Can't do a lot in soundness checking at such young ages, but I defiantly would get get those things Vet checked before paying foal off. We did, to prevent future heartbreak when horse went to work. Farm had no problem with that Vetting, extra handling, because they handle the foals daily anyway. . However we were buying foals on the ground, not a "custom order" foal.
                    Since I am leasing the mare through the pregnancy that is the cost of the foal - so the foal will be 100% mine when it hits the ground. Since I chose the stallion and mare it's a little different than buying an in-utero foal - I have a live foal guarantee from the stallion but unfortunately not much I can do if anything happens on the foal end. However, this is an extremely high quality Oldenburg stallion and a high quality mare, both with amazing bloodlines and also with great histories of producing solid, healthy foals. So we have our fingers crossed everything will work out well. As for the other person's foal, that will actually be a pony foal she will be buying in-utero or when it is on the ground around the same time mine is born.

                    Comment


                      #11
                      Maybe I'm missing something, but If they're in utero now, they will be yearlings "late next September". 2 yearlings loose in a 2 horse trailer doesn't sound safe to me, ESP if its one of each gender. If they were true weanlings (4.5 mo) then I think you're fine, but in this case I'd call Brookledge.
                      When the boogeyman goes to sleep, he checks the closet for George Morris. -mpsbarnmanager

                      Comment


                        #12
                        As somebody else mentioned...you are making some size assumptions on two future weanlings. What breed/type are they going to be-QH, WB something else? and how old will they be next Sep? They do grow like weeds and some can be strapping big 4 month olds and bigger 6 month olds, at what approximate age will you be shipping? Gather your friend has not yet signed any contract?

                        Certainly need to leave some flexibility in your plans this far out. Long way to go to foaling, hope friend stays on board with you all the way as well.
                        When opportunity knocks it's wearing overalls and looks like work.

                        The horse world. Two people. Three opinions.

                        Comment

                          Original Poster

                          #13
                          Originally posted by Alterrain View Post
                          Maybe I'm missing something, but If they're in utero now, they will be yearlings "late next September". 2 yearlings loose in a 2 horse trailer doesn't sound safe to me, ESP if its one of each gender. If they were true weanlings (4.5 mo) then I think you're fine, but in this case I'd call Brookledge.
                          My baby is only one month in-utero at the moment. Due date April 30th, will be weaned at 4.5-5 months and will be trailering at 5.5 months.

                          Comment

                            Original Poster

                            #14
                            Originally posted by findeight View Post
                            As somebody else mentioned...you are making some size assumptions on two future weanlings. What breed/type are they going to be-QH, WB something else? and how old will they be next Sep? They do grow like weeds and some can be strapping big 4 month olds and bigger 6 month olds, at what approximate age will you be shipping? Gather your friend has not yet signed any contract?

                            Certainly need to leave some flexibility in your plans this far out. Long way to go to foaling, hope friend stays on board with you all the way as well.
                            Nothing set in stone yet on my friend, just running ideas by each other. Her baby will be a pony foal and 5 months. Mine will be an Oldenburg foal and 5 months. No contract signed so a lot of this will be played by ear.

                            Comment


                              #15
                              Originally posted by tessasereyna View Post

                              My baby is only one month in-utero at the moment. Due date April 30th, will be weaned at 4.5-5 months and will be trailering at 5.5 months.
                              ah. Apologies. I assumed you meant due this month. Carry on!
                              When the boogeyman goes to sleep, he checks the closet for George Morris. -mpsbarnmanager

                              Comment


                                #16
                                This depends on a lot of things. If the babies are both well weaned, it will be easier, but babies still don't have much sense. Can a small, steady pony or mini travel with to sooth them? If the other person pulls out, it might be better. Two weanlings together might want to play, or panic, together. They won't know each other and there is a big size difference. I think it would be better to haul your weanling with a steady, sensible, companion.

                                If you make the first leg of the trip relatively short, the two will have time to bond overnight. Do you have a pony or steady type that will be the weanling's companion in Colorado? Can you bring them along?

                                Comment

                                  Original Poster

                                  #17
                                  Originally posted by Moonlitoaks View Post
                                  This depends on a lot of things. If the babies are both well weaned, it will be easier, but babies still don't have much sense. Can a small, steady pony or mini travel with to sooth them? If the other person pulls out, it might be better. Two weanlings together might want to play, or panic, together. They won't know each other and there is a big size difference. I think it would be better to haul your weanling with a steady, sensible, companion.

                                  If you make the first leg of the trip relatively short, the two will have time to bond overnight. Do you have a pony or steady type that will be the weanling's companion in Colorado? Can you bring them along?
                                  I'm wondering about the possibility of a mini. There is nothing set in stone with my friend - she hasn't even officially purchased her in-utero baby yet. The only thing set in stone is my baby and the fact that I know I don't want them all alone in the trailer for that long of a trip. We have considered purchasing a mini or mini donkey or even a goat to make the trip with the foal - at this point we're just trying to see what would result in the most calm trip! I had thought of two foals playing as well.

                                  Once the foal is in Colorado they will be joining a pasture herd of other weanlings. So the companion on the trip won't necessarily stay with the little one.

                                  Comment

                                  Working...
                                  X