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Leg Position and Stability, Seat Questions, And More

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  • Leg Position and Stability, Seat Questions, And More

    Some of you may know, but I’ve bounced around with a few (4) trainers. I was looking through old videos and photos and things from all of my years riding and realized a few things.

    1) I have a very swingy outside leg when cantering
    It seems to be worse when the horse speeds up. Which is probably because my leg is trying to do the hokey pokey

    2) I am constantly losing my stirrups. I Probably ride more without stirrups than With.
    I do tend to lose then more when I am cantering because I have a tendency to pop my heels up to cue

    3) I lean to the inside when turning (maybe not leg position but oh well)
    I tend to lean more when transitioning or collecting or extending in a corner or on a circle. When I was doing balance exercises constantly this wasn’t a problem. Also, if there are ground poles the leaning seems to disappear. Cones on the other hand, not so much.

    4) How far should your toe stick out?
    My saddleseat trainer said your toe should be out as much as possible. My next instructor said parallel with the horse. The next one said it depends on the cues you are giving and how you are riding in that moment, if you are using spurs etc. The last one said toes out as much as possible. I find that when my toes are out, my heel is up and it makes me more unbalanced. When my toes are at a natural spot for me ( slightly out but sometimes more in or out depending on what i am asking of the horse) Quite a few of my problems go away (i can keep my stirrup easier, my leg doesn’t swing as much, and i find it easier to keep my leg stable)

    5) I tend to dip my pelvis forwards
    The third instructor helped me with this a lot. She told me imagine my middle as a fish bowl filled to the brim with a bunch of goldfish in it. If i tilted my hips/ pelvis the wrong way, the fish would come tumbling out to the ground. It was really easy to focus on this when I didn’t have to worry about other things (such as when on a Lunge line) but when I was focusing on other things such as learning a new skill, it was so much harder. Any Tips for keeping the fish alive and in the fish bowl so to speak?

    6). “Gas pedal” outside leg
    the last trainer I went to was always preaching to me about how the outside leg is only for telling the horse to go faster or to extend or shorter stride. The inside leg was for turn cues. This always confused me because If you only use one leg for steering I get very unbalanced and the horse has a very hard time turning anywhere but to the immediate inside.

    7) heels down, or not?
    I was told my many people (even approached my random people at. Shows) that I keep my heel down too much. While sometimes I do (usually when the horse stumbles and I have a moment of “oh heck”) But i usually have them at about I would say at just slightly down. When my heel is down more than that my leg shoots forward and I feel ( and probably look) like my knee is nonexistent and my leg is stuck in one position like a Barbie doll

    8) I have trouble holding a diagonal
    I am legally blind in One eye, and i have a lot of trouble looking for my diagonal unless move my head down. I can find my diagonal If i sit the trot for a few strides, but how can I check to. Make sure I’m on the right diagonal without screwing with my balance or to stop posting

    9) I lean back in the canter
    I think it’s because I used to lean forward and now i overcompensate with leaning back and hollowing my back.

    I will probably think of more later. I will edit this post an add them if I do. Lol

  • #2
    One thing I am FINALLY starting to learn and incorporate (after 20 years of riding), is how very important it is to ride with your core!

    I have been focusing on my overall core strength and it has made a world of difference. I am quiet in the saddle, “grip less” with my upper thigh/calf (defensive habit I learned while riding scary jumping horses), and am stronger overall.

    I know that doesn’t answer all (or maybe any) of your questions, but it’s been a big “Ah-Ha!”, moment for me.

    Good luck!
    Last edited by Hoofbeat_Heartbeat; Apr. 22, 2020, 11:53 AM. Reason: Spelling

    Comment


    • #3
      There are probably as many styles to ride as there are breeds of horses, then add in the individual skill of each person riding... so perhaps the most useful thing for you to do is look through the many, many examples of equestrian sport online and find the top riders in the discipline you like. Study and try to emulate them, perhaps looking closely at each of the problem areas you have identified. There is, however, a reason why the majority of Olympic sports look to dressage as the foundation of effective riding.

      If you want to show in the US then you will have to ride in the appropriate style. Saddle seat is unique to America. To me, with European eyes, it looks to be highly inefficient and so not functional. The heels fixed down is also an American thing: European riders do not have such exaggerated heels and so have a deeper seat when jumping.

      Another thing to consider, given your different trainers, is what actually worked for you and for your horse? Which leg aid did your horse respond to best, foot straight, foot turned out? Which position made you feel the most secure? As a simple rule, given, I presume, that you are trying to work in balance and harmony with your horse, if the horse was suddenly removed from beneath you, would you be able to hold your position or would you fall over?

      Welcome to the confusing world of equestrianism. A wise person a long time ago commented that riding is simple but it isn't easy.
      "Good young horses are bred, but good advanced horses are trained" Sam Griffiths

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by TheChristianEquestrian View Post
        Some of you may know, but I’ve bounced around with a few (4) trainers. I was looking through old videos and photos and things from all of my years riding and realized a few things.

        1) I have a very swingy outside leg when cantering
        It seems to be worse when the horse speeds up. Which is probably because my leg is trying to do the hokey pokey

        2) I am constantly losing my stirrups. I Probably ride more without stirrups than With.
        I do tend to lose then more when I am cantering because I have a tendency to pop my heels up to cue

        3) I lean to the inside when turning (maybe not leg position but oh well)
        I tend to lean more when transitioning or collecting or extending in a corner or on a circle. When I was doing balance exercises constantly this wasn’t a problem. Also, if there are ground poles the leaning seems to disappear. Cones on the other hand, not so much.

        4) How far should your toe stick out?
        My saddleseat trainer said your toe should be out as much as possible. My next instructor said parallel with the horse. The next one said it depends on the cues you are giving and how you are riding in that moment, if you are using spurs etc. The last one said toes out as much as possible. I find that when my toes are out, my heel is up and it makes me more unbalanced. When my toes are at a natural spot for me ( slightly out but sometimes more in or out depending on what i am asking of the horse) Quite a few of my problems go away (i can keep my stirrup easier, my leg doesn’t swing as much, and i find it easier to keep my leg stable)

        5) I tend to dip my pelvis forwards
        The third instructor helped me with this a lot. She told me imagine my middle as a fish bowl filled to the brim with a bunch of goldfish in it. If i tilted my hips/ pelvis the wrong way, the fish would come tumbling out to the ground. It was really easy to focus on this when I didn’t have to worry about other things (such as when on a Lunge line) but when I was focusing on other things such as learning a new skill, it was so much harder. Any Tips for keeping the fish alive and in the fish bowl so to speak?

        6). “Gas pedal” outside leg
        the last trainer I went to was always preaching to me about how the outside leg is only for telling the horse to go faster or to extend or shorter stride. The inside leg was for turn cues. This always confused me because If you only use one leg for steering I get very unbalanced and the horse has a very hard time turning anywhere but to the immediate inside.

        7) heels down, or not?
        I was told my many people (even approached my random people at. Shows) that I keep my heel down too much. While sometimes I do (usually when the horse stumbles and I have a moment of “oh heck”) But i usually have them at about I would say at just slightly down. When my heel is down more than that my leg shoots forward and I feel ( and probably look) like my knee is nonexistent and my leg is stuck in one position like a Barbie doll

        8) I have trouble holding a diagonal
        I am legally blind in One eye, and i have a lot of trouble looking for my diagonal unless move my head down. I can find my diagonal If i sit the trot for a few strides, but how can I check to. Make sure I’m on the right diagonal without screwing with my balance or to stop posting

        9) I lean back in the canter
        I think it’s because I used to lean forward and now i overcompensate with leaning back and hollowing my back.

        I will probably think of more later. I will edit this post an add them if I do. Lol
        Seems to me you should start looking for a good INSTRUCTOR, someone who is not interested in training your horse but in training YOU. You have a compendium of faults; what you need is someone who can address those faults. It is very good that you call yourself out as WAY too many riders with similar fault profiles deny everything and blame the horse. Now that you have taken the first, and most difficult step, you must take the second step and find yourself a teacher. And, perhaps, ride the teacher's horse(s) for a while as you work on your seat (which includes core strength, stirrup length, foot position, etc.).

        Good instructors are hard to find and you have to pay them. Good luck as you search!!!

        G.
        Mangalarga Marchador: Uma Raa, Uma Paixo

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by TheChristianEquestrian View Post
          Some of you may know, but I’ve bounced around with a few (4) trainers. I was looking through old videos and photos and things from all of my years riding and realized a few things.

          1) I have a very swingy outside leg when cantering
          It seems to be worse when the horse speeds up. Which is probably because my leg is trying to do the hokey pokey

          2) I am constantly losing my stirrups. I Probably ride more without stirrups than With.
          I do tend to lose then more when I am cantering because I have a tendency to pop my heels up to cue

          3) I lean to the inside when turning (maybe not leg position but oh well)
          I tend to lean more when transitioning or collecting or extending in a corner or on a circle. When I was doing balance exercises constantly this wasn’t a problem. Also, if there are ground poles the leaning seems to disappear. Cones on the other hand, not so much.

          4) How far should your toe stick out?
          My saddleseat trainer said your toe should be out as much as possible. My next instructor said parallel with the horse. The next one said it depends on the cues you are giving and how you are riding in that moment, if you are using spurs etc. The last one said toes out as much as possible. I find that when my toes are out, my heel is up and it makes me more unbalanced. When my toes are at a natural spot for me ( slightly out but sometimes more in or out depending on what i am asking of the horse) Quite a few of my problems go away (i can keep my stirrup easier, my leg doesn’t swing as much, and i find it easier to keep my leg stable)

          5) I tend to dip my pelvis forwards
          The third instructor helped me with this a lot. She told me imagine my middle as a fish bowl filled to the brim with a bunch of goldfish in it. If i tilted my hips/ pelvis the wrong way, the fish would come tumbling out to the ground. It was really easy to focus on this when I didn’t have to worry about other things (such as when on a Lunge line) but when I was focusing on other things such as learning a new skill, it was so much harder. Any Tips for keeping the fish alive and in the fish bowl so to speak?

          6). “Gas pedal” outside leg
          the last trainer I went to was always preaching to me about how the outside leg is only for telling the horse to go faster or to extend or shorter stride. The inside leg was for turn cues. This always confused me because If you only use one leg for steering I get very unbalanced and the horse has a very hard time turning anywhere but to the immediate inside.

          7) heels down, or not?
          I was told my many people (even approached my random people at. Shows) that I keep my heel down too much. While sometimes I do (usually when the horse stumbles and I have a moment of “oh heck”) But i usually have them at about I would say at just slightly down. When my heel is down more than that my leg shoots forward and I feel ( and probably look) like my knee is nonexistent and my leg is stuck in one position like a Barbie doll

          8) I have trouble holding a diagonal
          I am legally blind in One eye, and i have a lot of trouble looking for my diagonal unless move my head down. I can find my diagonal If i sit the trot for a few strides, but how can I check to. Make sure I’m on the right diagonal without screwing with my balance or to stop posting

          9) I lean back in the canter
          I think it’s because I used to lean forward and now i overcompensate with leaning back and hollowing my back.

          I will probably think of more later. I will edit this post an add them if I do. Lol
          First all of these are interconnected problems of balance and core stability that are common enough in beginning riders. All that says to me is that you don't yet have a true independent seat and need many more miles in the saddle. I would suggest doing longe line seat lessons to get your basic balance, fitness off the horse to improve core, and try to ride every day.

          I look at teenagers and they all seem so fit and slim (compared to my age group, even plumper teens look wonderful even if they don't recognize it themselves). But actually teens can be lacking in core fitness and overall strength unless they are multisport athletes, particularly if they are tall and willowy. A slim teen can look fit but actually not have developed that much core strength yet. So doing core strength exercises like sitting on a Pilates ball etc could be really useful.

          Second, you say you have vision problems in one eye. That *has* to affect your balance overall.

          Reading this I was wondering if you have an undiagnosed asymmetry like scoliosis or if one leg is shorter than the other. I have a friend with very mild scoliosis not diagnosed until her mid 30s and it plays complete havoc with her position in ways you wouldn't expect. She's a really good tactful experienced brave rider but sometimes she gets tipping forward/ leg sliding back like an advanced beginner lesson kid. And she tries *so hard* to fix it.

          When I came to the part about being legally blind in one eye I had an "ahah" moment. That *has* to affect your balance on and off the horse. A well trained horse will change directions just from you looking in the direction you want to go. They can feel us move our head. Likewise if we look down we mess up our own balance. I am sure you must have to move your head a lot in real life, and you may even be doing something like walking around with your head slightly turned to center your good eye on the world. And this in itself is going to torque your spine and unbalance you every which way.

          I realize you are a teen and not able to seek out medical help on your own. But if you can, I would really suggest finding a good sports physical therapist and getting an evaluation of your overall symmetry, plus exercises to improve.

          As far as basic riding tips for jump seat:

          1. Your toes will stick out when you are a beginner and become more parallel as you progress. Jump seat will always be a bit more "out" than dressage. Don't sweat this. It will come.

          2. Work on dropping your thigh down and getting your leg under you. Don't jam your heels, that will send your leg forward. Instead raise your toes.

          3. In general a well trained jumper turns off the outside aids. You look in the direction you want to go. This rotates your body so your outside thigh presses against the horse. He turns away from your thigh and you moderate that turn with the outside rein. No inside rein unless he is disobeying you.

          4. You can train a horse to respond to any set of cues. If you are riding "straight English" hunter jumper now, forget anything you were told in saddle seat and AQHA hunt seat. Does not apply, do not worry about it or try to make the disciplines line up. Just let it go.

          5. There are many resources out there for "straight English" hunter jumper basic riding. You can look these up if you suspect your instructor is giving you idiosyncratic instructions.

          6. In general horses are trained to move away from pressure, not towards pressure. My riding is heavily influenced by dressage so I expect that using a single *calf* on a horse is a signal to shift the hind quarters *away* from that leg. Depending on what I am doing with my weight and reins, that might mean a turn on the forehand, a shoulder in, a leg yield, or a half pass.

          7. The exception is canter cues. The traditional canter cue is inside leg at the girth, outside leg a little back. Honestly I've never ridden a personal horse where I've consistently used the full cue. Once they are warmed up and "off the leg" they will canter on just a touch of inside calf, which signals the lead, or even just me "thinking canter" and allowing with my seat. And before they are warmed up they just blow through the aid and give me a running trot no matter how precise the cue.


          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by TheChristianEquestrian View Post
            Some of you may know, but I’ve bounced around with a few (4) trainers. I was looking through old videos and photos and things from all of my years riding and realized a few things.

            1) I have a very swingy outside leg when cantering
            It seems to be worse when the horse speeds up. Which is probably because my leg is trying to do the hokey pokey

            Try not to grip with the knee.

            2) I am constantly losing my stirrups. I Probably ride more without stirrups than With.
            I do tend to lose then more when I am cantering because I have a tendency to pop my heels up to cue

            Your knees are probably coming up . Again gripping the thigh and knees pulls you up and away from the saddle. You can feel this for yourself next time you ride by purposely gripping and relaxing your thighs and knees and noticing the difference.

            You are probably turning your toe out when trying to give the leg aid. This tends to pull your calf away from the side. You want press with the calf.
            it takes some getting used to. Try it at the walk and trot first.

            3) I lean to the inside when turning (maybe not leg position but oh well)
            I tend to lean more when transitioning or collecting or extending in a corner or on a circle. When I was doing balance exercises constantly this wasn’t a problem. Also, if there are ground poles the leaning seems to disappear. Cones on the other hand, not so much.

            Maybe you are collapsing at the waist causing your shoulder to drop. Also you could be turning your head but not your shoulders. Line up your shoulders with his shoulders.

            4) How far should your toe stick out?
            My saddleseat trainer said your toe should be out as much as possible. My next instructor said parallel with the horse. The next one said it depends on the cues you are giving and how you are riding in that moment, if you are using spurs etc. The last one said toes out as much as possible. I find that when my toes are out, my heel is up and it makes me more unbalanced. When my toes are at a natural spot for me ( slightly out but sometimes more in or out depending on what i am asking of the horse) Quite a few of my problems go away (i can keep my stirrup easier, my leg doesn’t swing as much, and i find it easier to keep my leg stable)

            Ideally you want to keep your toes to his nose, but that isnt always possible. Turning the toes out pulls your knee away from the saddle. Just let your toes be where they are naturally.

            5) I tend to dip my pelvis forwards
            The third instructor helped me with this a lot. She told me imagine my middle as a fish bowl filled to the brim with a bunch of goldfish in it. If i tilted my hips/ pelvis the wrong way, the fish would come tumbling out to the ground. It was really easy to focus on this when I didn’t have to worry about other things (such as when on a Lunge line) but when I was focusing on other things such as learning a new skill, it was so much harder. Any Tips for keeping the fish alive and in the fish bowl so to speak?

            You just have to be aware. If you have a sway back you may have a natural pelvic tilt and you'll have to work at it for a while until you get it into your muscle memory

            6). “Gas pedal” outside leg
            the last trainer I went to was always preaching to me about how the outside leg is only for telling the horse to go faster or to extend or shorter stride. The inside leg was for turn cues. This always confused me because If you only use one leg for steering I get very unbalanced and the horse has a very hard time turning anywhere but to the immediate inside.

            Well, that is probably how she was taught, so she passed it on. The leg aid on the girth cues the foreleg, and the leg aid behind the girth cues the hind leg.

            Most horses are not straight and move their shoulders in or out off the track. So you use the inside leg aid or outside leg aid to maintain straightness.

            7) heels down, or not?
            I was told my many people (even approached my random people at. Shows) that I keep my heel down too much. While sometimes I do (usually when the horse stumbles and I have a moment of “oh heck”) But i usually have them at about I would say at just slightly down. When my heel is down more than that my leg shoots forward and I feel ( and probably look) like my knee is nonexistent and my leg is stuck in one position like a Barbie doll

            You dont have to push your heels down or press your feet into the stirrups. Keep the ball of your foot resting on the stirrup, and your heel will stay down slightly anyway.

            8) I have trouble holding a diagonal
            I am legally blind in One eye, and i have a lot of trouble looking for my diagonal unless move my head down. I can find my diagonal If i sit the trot for a few strides, but how can I check to. Make sure I’m on the right diagonal without screwing with my balance or to stop posting.

            Remember to sit one beat when you cue the posting trot.

            Practice posting at the walk without stirrups and focus on your hip. As the outside leg moves forward your hip will move forward with it. It does take some practice but you will learn to feel it. Then you can practice at the trot. Posting trot without stirrups is a good exercise.

            9) I lean back in the canter
            I think it’s because I used to lean forward and now i overcompensate with leaning back and hollowing my back.

            Just remember to keep your shoulders over your hips.

            I will probably think of more later. I will edit this post an add them if I do. Lol
            Hope these help.
            I've made all the mistakes you have mentioned and then some.
            Certified Guacophobe

            Comment


            • #7
              G is right: you need a GOOD riding instructor, and not just the closest one, but one that is specific to the discipline you want to ride.

              What discipline do you want to ride? You mentioned saddle seat, which is a world and riding style unto itself. But I can give you pointers from the dressage POV; others can give you correct pointers for hunters, or western. Equitation does differ depending on what you're doing. So what we say might not mesh with what you really want to do.

              As someone else mentioned, most of your issues probably stem from a lack of core strength. Pilates, yoga, and core strengthening exercises will help with that. If you were my student, you'd be on the lunge line for a few months learning proper balance and posture, both of which come from core strength. Honestly, this should be done regardless of what you ride.

              Constantly losing your stirrups, and a 'swingy' outside leg, are again indicative of a lack of strength and balance. Heels need to be down, period. They don't have to shoved down uncomfortably into the stirrups, but weight in the heels is a must. The leg is the foundation of the ride. Proper leg position is a must. I wouldn't even worry about toe position at this point - we all have different conformation, and you do what's comfortable for you. Some can achieve that perfect 'toes forward' position, some have toes slightly out. If the leg position is correct and you can use the leg aids correctly, it shouldn't matter.

              As for that 'gas pedal outside leg' - um. No. I've never heard that. BOTH legs are for 'steering' the horse. Inside leg at the girth; outside leg on, but slightly behind the girth, along with seat and hand aids, tell the horse the direction to turn. Hand, seat, and leg aids work in unison.

              Holding the diagonal - you should be able to feel the diagonal. Again, this is where I'd put you on the lunge line. You shouldn't need to look down to get the diagonal; you should be able to feel it. It takes practice, to be sure, but you can feel it in the seat. That is something you can practice on your own. Have someone on the ground to be your eyes, ask for the trot, then sit the trot until you feel the correct leg moving. Start posting. Your ground person can then correct or congratulate you. Before long, it won't be an issue. (I also tend to look down for various reasons, and the weight of your head moving in that direction does affect your entire posture and balance, you're right!) Practice changing diagonals frequently until feeling them becomes second nature.

              Like G said, it's great that you recognize these issues. Without us knowing what discipline you want to ride, it's hard to give more specifics. But I think most of your issues do come from a lack of a good equitation foundation, and a lack of core and leg strength.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Scribbler View Post

                First all of these are interconnected problems of balance and core stability that are common enough in beginning riders. All that says to me is that you don't yet have a true independent seat and need many more miles in the saddle. I would suggest doing longe line seat lessons to get your basic balance, fitness off the horse to improve core, and try to ride every day.
                This.

                Everything you list sounds like most beginner riders. And you can be a beginner rider for a long time (or you may not improve quickly) unless you can ride often and have a good instructor AND good horses to learn on. Horses that are not well-schooled make it difficult to learn, period.

                How long have you been riding? And how often do you ride?
                I agree that you also need to tailor your riding to the style you want; I think that good riders in any discipline can ride effectively, there are differences in what is considered "correct."

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                • #9
                  I skimmed through the replies so apologies if this has already been addressed, but what discipline are you riding?

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                  • #10
                    I have an idea for you. How about sending video of you riding to an accredited USEF physical therapist? I was watching Amelia Newcomb on youtube and she had a video highlighting her PT. I contacted Stephanie directly and sent her video and without me saying a word she described everything about my riding and the physical issues I've tried to overcome.

                    She gave me two simple exercises and now 4 months later I'm surprised just how much they have changed how I feel in my body.

                    Advanced Physio is physio for riders. helps equestrians take their ride to the next level, by working with them to correct their body mechanics and improve strength and flexibility. Ride Advanced.

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                    • #11
                      How many days a week do you ride? When I was younger and unmarried, childless and only had myself to think about I rode 6 days a week on multiple horses for hours each day. I didn't move in the saddle.

                      Fast forward 25 years . Married , 3 kids , winters off , I have 1 horse that I do ride 4-5 times a week 1-2 hour rides and I have nowhere near the seat, leg stability I used to.

                      Nothing can replace hours daily in the saddle.

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by RideEveryStride View Post
                        I skimmed through the replies so apologies if this has already been addressed, but what discipline are you riding?
                        I believe the OP currently wants to ride Hunter jumper but has bounced around the somewhat limited possibilities in her locality, including an AQHA hunt seat barn. I thought she was back at a h/j barn where she took a bad fall last year. Apologies OP if I have mixed you up with another poster!

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Willesdon View Post
                          Another thing to consider, given your different trainers, is what actually worked for you and for your horse?
                          That's a very interesting question: when do you feel effective? When does the horse respond quicker/sharper than otherwise?

                          Ride with two trainers, you get 3 opinions. The opinion that matters is the horse's.

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                          • Original Poster

                            #14
                            Sorry for taking a while to respond. I took a bit of a break from the internet because I felt I was on it too much. I will try my best to answer the questions presented and make comments. Let me know if I missed something.

                            Guilherme
                            i had an amazing instructor that I rode with at least 2 times a week for multiple hours, but she was really hard to handle out of the arena. She was very insistent on us joining her in her religious views and medical views and always brought it up. It got to the point she was sneaking Info cards in my riding bag. She hosts clinic type things sometimes and I have plans on going to some when I’m able. She helped me so much with most of my problems, but old habits are hard to break unless you have someone constantly on your back.

                            Scribbler
                            I have never thought about my vision causing balance problems. I don’t have the very best depth perception, but that was easy to find a way around.(lots of walking small ground pole “courses” and tripping many times before I realized exactly how my vision is deceiving me. Lol) I will definitely look into that some more.

                            from my 2 more serious falls (the first I broke my shoulder and the second I did an emergency dismount, landed on my feet, and proceeded to roll around on the ground and I landed HARD) I managed to rotate the right side of my pelvis slightly forwards and left side slightly backwards. My pelvis is also tilted a bit cockeyed. I am seeing a chiropractor and it was almost straightened out before COVID. It’s probably regressed some since I haven’t been able to go in almost 3 months, but I am working on getting it fixed up.
                            I also managed to damage my knees, mostly from the second fall where I landed very hard on my feet. The soft tissue was a bit damaged and my knee cap (more so on the right) doesn’t always track properly. I am working on rehabilitation with my knees but it’s a slow process. I did still ride when it first happened, which definitely did not help it.

                            in short, I will be looking into these things

                            AnastasiaBeaverhousen
                            thank you! I will keep these in mind

                            Alex and Bodie's Mom
                            I would love to ride hunter/jumper Or jumper and keep some dressage in my riding. One of my friends introduced me to some level 1 dressage things on her horse and I loved it, sadly she moved away or else I would be at her house every day.

                            S1969
                            I rode for 6 years before stopping in mid May 2019 due to me absolutely hating the type of lessons I was having (HUS. Literally all I was doing for at least a solid hour was w/t/c on the rail. Sometimes a random figure 8. I also felt I was regressing in my riding) the first year or so was Saddleseat. It was the first time I was a horse and I thought it was the only style of riding at the time so of course I loved it. Them for almost 4 years I rode with an amazing lady, but sadly it got to the point where, because I was one of the only students who rode year round and was out riding 1-4 times a week in lessons, I was her most advanced student and we reached a halt in progression that led to regression. She pretty much told me to get a new instructor after telling her other students I had already left and telling my mother that I was incompetent. Long story there. Then for about a year and then some I rode with A fantastic lady Who I mentioned near the top of this reply and then found the HUS barn. With the last two I was riding 1-6 times a week, usually between 1-4 hours (3-4 hours at the lady’s program usually) per day.

                            PaddockWood
                            I will for sure look into doing this! Thank you so much for letting me know this is something you can do! If you don’t mind Sharing (you don’t have to answer) can I ask what problems she pointed out and the exercises she gave you?

                            Scribbler
                            Hello again!
                            the second instructor I was with is the one I broke my shoulder Under in 2017. Then I moved to the lady I had my second “bad” fall with, and then the AQHA HUS barn.
                            very close though!


                            Now to address some general things and maybe help with some understanding possibly:

                            I am about 5’4” nearing 5’5”, and weigh about 130lbs. I have what I consider to be a pretty normal frame. I started jiu jiutzu in December 2019 since I couldn’t ride and am starting a fitness program made for martial arts Very soon. I also plan on starting to do yogi with my mom once her DVDs come in. I did have a Pilates ball that I would stretches and things on for riders, but i sat down too hard one day and POP. To think it could handle someone twice my size but not little ol me? Lol
                            I may see if my mom knows any exercises I can do to help with balance (she is an occupational therapist) and see what her PT friends have to say once it’s safe to go around them. Thank you everyone for the advice. I really appreciate it!

                            also, while waiting for me to be able to ride again, I did find a lady on Facebook that has horses for Lease that used to be lesson horses and she teaches lessons. She teaches mainly western now (Which is probably why I didn’t look into her before) , but she said she rode hunter/jumper for almost 15 years before getting into the “cowboy crowd” as she said. She said she wouldn’t mind at all getting back into her “fancy roots” and letting me ride at her barn. She said she wouldn’t mind me setting up ground poles and such in her arena as long as I let her join. She said she also has a border that used to be an event we that has a couple horses that I may be able to ride a time or two once I work my way back up to jumping. I’m not letting myself get too hopeful just in case it doesn’t work out, and I know it’s not an instructor (which I really need) but I feel like it’s a big step towards be getting back in the saddle until I get the courage to learn to drive so I can eventually venture further out that a 50 mile radius.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              TheChristianEquestrian
                              I sent her video of me riding and she sent back a lengthy analysis of my riding at every gate. She accurately described the weakness and crookedness I feel. I sit off to the left and feel weak in my right leg for starters.

                              What has been so remarkable is for the past 6 months I've been doing three simple exercises most days and I cannot get over how much stronger my right glute is now. She felt my right glute medius was a big culprit due to its weakness. I also notice my lower back no longer bothers me. And I'm standing straighter.

                              I haven't ridden but look forward to seeing how it feels given my new strength and hope my crookedness is reduced or gone.



                              Comment


                              • #16
                                Your mom is a PT?
                                Does she have access to a balance board, teeter totter thing?
                                Between that and a balance ball you can improve riding balance, core and use if independent body parts. A bosu could help too.

                                Another idea, look for Barre ballet videos and do some of those, even using a counter or the back of a chair as your Barre.
                                Yo/Yousolong April 23rd, 1985- April 15th, 2014

                                http://notesfromadogwalker.com/2012/...m-a-sanctuary/

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