Sport Horse Spotlight

Real Estate Spotlight

105 DSCN0687

Sale Spotlight

COTH_without Subscribe
  • Welcome to the Chronicle Forums.
    Please complete your profile. The forums and the rest of www.chronofhorse.com has single sign-in, so your log in information for one will automatically work for the other. Disclaimer: The opinions expressed here are the views of the individual and do not necessarily reflect the views and opinions of The Chronicle of the Horse.

Announcement

Collapse

Forum rules and no-advertising policy

As a participant on this forum, it is your responsibility to know and follow our rules. Please read this message in its entirety.

Board Rules

1. You�re responsible for what you say.
As outlined in Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act, The Chronicle of the Horse and its affiliates, as well Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd., the developers of vBulletin, are not legally responsible for statements made in the Forums.

This is a public forum viewed by a wide spectrum of people, so please be mindful of what you say and who might be reading it�details of personal disputes may be better handled privately. While posters are legally responsible for their statements, the moderators may in their discretion remove or edit posts, though are not legally obligated to do so, regardless of content.

Users have the ability to modify or delete their own messages after posting. Moderators generally will not delete posts, threads or accounts unless they have been alerted and have determined that a post, thread or user has violated the Forums� policies. Moderators do not regularly independently monitor the Forums for such violations.

Profanity, outright vulgarity, blatant personal insults or otherwise inappropriate statements will not be tolerated and will be dealt with at the discretion of the moderators.

Users may provide their positive or negative experiences with or opinions of companies, products, individuals, etc.; however, accounts involving allegations of criminal behavior against named individuals or companies MUST be first-hand accounts and may NOT be made anonymously.

If a situation has been reported upon by a reputable news source or addressed by law enforcement or the legal system it is open for discussion, but if an individual wants to make their own claims of criminal behavior against a named party in the course of that discussion, they too must identify themselves by first and last name and the account must be first-person.

Criminal allegations that do not satisfy these requirements, when brought to our attention, may be removed pending satisfaction of these criteria, and we reserve the right to err on the side of caution when making these determinations.

Credible threats of suicide will be reported to the police along with identifying user information at our disposal, in addition to referring the user to suicide helpline resources such as 1-800-SUICIDE or 1-800-273-TALK.

2. Conversations in horse-related forums should be horse-related.
The forums are a wonderful source of information and support for members of the horse community. While it�s understandably tempting to share information or search for input on other topics upon which members might have a similar level of knowledge, members must maintain the focus on horses.

3. Keep conversations productive, on topic and civil.
Discussion and disagreement are inevitable and encouraged; personal insults, diatribes and sniping comments are unproductive and unacceptable. Whether a subject is light-hearted or serious, keep posts focused on the current topic and of general interest to other participants of that thread. Utilize the private message feature or personal email where appropriate to address side topics or personal issues not related to the topic at large.

4. No advertising in the discussion forums.
Posts in the discussion forums directly or indirectly advertising horses, jobs, items or services for sale or wanted will be removed at the discretion of the moderators. Use of the private messaging feature or email addresses obtained through users� profiles for unsolicited advertising is not permitted.

Company representatives may participate in discussions and answer questions about their products or services, or suggest their products on recent threads if they fulfill the criteria of a query. False "testimonials" provided by company affiliates posing as general consumers are not appropriate, and self-promotion of sales, ad campaigns, etc. through the discussion forums is not allowed.

Paid advertising is available on our classifieds site and through the purchase of banner ads. The tightly monitored Giveaways forum permits free listings of genuinely free horses and items available or wanted (on a limited basis). Items offered for trade are not allowed.

Advertising Policy Specifics
When in doubt of whether something you want to post constitutes advertising, please contact a moderator privately in advance for further clarification. Refer to the following points for general guidelines:

Horses � Only general discussion about the buying, leasing, selling and pricing of horses is permitted. If the post contains, or links to, the type of specific information typically found in a sales or wanted ad, and it�s related to a horse for sale, regardless of who�s selling it, it doesn�t belong in the discussion forums.

Stallions � Board members may ask for suggestions on breeding stallion recommendations. Stallion owners may reply to such queries by suggesting their own stallions, only if their horse fits the specific criteria of the original poster. Excessive promotion of a stallion by its owner or related parties is not permitted and will be addressed at the discretion of the moderators.

Services � Members may use the forums to ask for general recommendations of trainers, barns, shippers, farriers, etc., and other members may answer those requests by suggesting themselves or their company, if their services fulfill the specific criteria of the original post. Members may not solicit other members for business if it is not in response to a direct, genuine query.

Products � While members may ask for general opinions and suggestions on equipment, trailers, trucks, etc., they may not list the specific attributes for which they are in the market, as such posts serve as wanted ads.

Event Announcements � Members may post one notification of an upcoming event that may be of interest to fellow members, if the original poster does not benefit financially from the event. Such threads may not be �bumped� excessively. Premium members may post their own notices in the Event Announcements forum.

Charities/Rescues � Announcements for charitable or fundraising events can only be made for 501(c)(3) tax-exempt organizations. Special exceptions may be made, at the moderators� discretion and direction, for board-related events or fundraising activities in extraordinary circumstances.

Occasional posts regarding horses available for adoption through IRS-registered horse rescue or placement programs are permitted in the appropriate forums, but these threads may be limited at the discretion of the moderators. Individuals may not advertise or make announcements for horses in need of rescue, placement or adoption unless the horse is available through a recognized rescue or placement agency or government-run entity or the thread fits the criteria for and is located in the Giveaways forum.

5. Do not post copyrighted photographs unless you have purchased that photo and have permission to do so.

6. Respect other members.
As members are often passionate about their beliefs and intentions can easily be misinterpreted in this type of environment, try to explore or resolve the inevitable disagreements that arise in the course of threads calmly and rationally.

If you see a post that you feel violates the rules of the board, please click the �alert� button (exclamation point inside of a triangle) in the bottom left corner of the post, which will alert ONLY the moderators to the post in question. They will then take whatever action, or no action, as deemed appropriate for the situation at their discretion. Do not air grievances regarding other posters or the moderators in the discussion forums.

Please be advised that adding another user to your �Ignore� list via your User Control Panel can be a useful tactic, which blocks posts and private messages by members whose commentary you�d rather avoid reading.

7. We have the right to reproduce statements made in the forums.
The Chronicle of the Horse may copy, quote, link to or otherwise reproduce posts, or portions of posts, in print or online for advertising or editorial purposes, if attributed to their original authors, and by posting in this forum, you hereby grant to The Chronicle of the Horse a perpetual, non-exclusive license under copyright and other rights, to do so.

8. We reserve the right to enforce and amend the rules.
The moderators may delete, edit, move or close any post or thread at any time, or refrain from doing any of the foregoing, in their discretion, and may suspend or revoke a user�s membership privileges at any time to maintain adherence to the rules and the general spirit of the forum. These rules may be amended at any time to address the current needs of the board.

Please see our full Terms of Service and Privacy Policy for more information.

Thanks for being a part of the COTH forums!

(Revised 5/9/18)
See more
See less

Arena Etiquette

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Arena Etiquette

    I am writing a blog post about arena etiquette and have two questions.
    1. Is there anything about arena etiquette that you think I absolutely must include? I know the basics of tradition but... I might have forgotten something
    2. Does anyone have a few pictures of a lot of people in the warm up arena or at a stable etc. riding around in all directions? That I could use to illustrate my blog... I want to convey the chaos of a busy arena. Bonus points if there's someone driving too.
    I will give credit to photographer and caption with names of riders, trainers, stable, horses, whatever you want
    Thanks!

  • #2
    When we had large groups of us (12+ riders) riding in small sized arenas, we had a number of rules: Pass left hand to left hand; walk on an inside track; more advanced movements get right of way; Slower paces give way to faster paces. I can't remember ever having any crashes and new riders quickly learnt the rules.

    Comment


    • #3
      I think the most important thing to remember about arena etiquette is that you should not assume that every arena has the same rules so make sure you ask what the rules are for the arena you are going to ride in.

      Some places what the slow people on the outside, some what them on the inside, etc.

      Comment


      • #4
        Etiquette or rules? Rules vary depending on the arena.

        Etiquette covers the unwritten social niceties. Things like sharing the arena means thinking about how your figure or exercise affects the other riders (that spiral circle is not the best choice when there are ten other people, for example). Walking two abreast so you can chit chat creates a large roadblock for more active riders.

        The simplest things are generally not written. Look where you are going. When you meet another rider coming towards you, call your track using inside/outside especially if it's different from the arena rule (ex. pass left to left).

        The one I've encountered that is the most difficult to ride with is the person who sees me coming and abruptly changes their track - circles away, cuts across the diagonal, or similar - without a word. They don't realize they're cutting off my planned track, or forcing me to do an unplanned transition. They usually say they're trying to stay out of the way, but the unpredictable movement makes them horribly difficult to ride with. The unwritten etiquette for this might be plan and ride your track, and also includes look up and call your track and listen to the other riders you meet.


        While some schooling can be done in. a crowd, the more people there are in the arena the more an individual ride becomes more about exercise than advancing training.

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by jebabacus@yahoo.com View Post
          I am writing a blog post about arena etiquette and have two questions.
          1. Is there anything about arena etiquette that you think I absolutely must include? I know the basics of tradition but... I might have forgotten something
          2. Does anyone have a few pictures of a lot of people in the warm up arena or at a stable etc. riding around in all directions? That I could use to illustrate my blog... I want to convey the chaos of a busy arena. Bonus points if there's someone driving too.
          I will give credit to photographer and caption with names of riders, trainers, stable, horses, whatever you want
          Thanks!
          You do know that different associations have set rules?
          Here is a graphic of NRHA rules for warm up arenas:

          Comment


          • #6
            If you want to longe, please ask permission first from people riding.
            "She is not fragile like a flower. She is fragile like a bomb."

            Comment


            • #7
              Don't ride around the outside of longeing horses. Very dangerous. I learned this, ignored it once, and had a big scare.

              Don't bully other riders by trying to run them over and make them leave the ring.

              Comment

              • Original Poster

                #8
                Originally posted by Bluey View Post

                You do know that different associations have set rules?
                Here is a graphic of NRHA rules for warm up arenas:
                No I did not know this, thank you so much!!! I will add.

                Comment


                • #9
                  I find that the old pass left to left and slower people stay on an inside track is actually truly annoying to me. I much prefer that if you are walking, you stay on the rail and I will work around you. At a trot and canter I can move much faster and easily plan my track around a walking rider and the last thing I want is for them to try to avoid me and because they are slow, end up getting in my way.
                  "I'm too sexy for my blanket, too sexy for my blanket, these mares-they should take it..." (J-Lu) - Featuring The Skypizzle Pony aka Classic Skyline

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Hawks Nest View Post
                    I find that the old pass left to left and slower people stay on an inside track is actually truly annoying to me. I much prefer that if you are walking, you stay on the rail and I will work around you. At a trot and canter I can move much faster and easily plan my track around a walking rider and the last thing I want is for them to try to avoid me and because they are slow, end up getting in my way.
                    Yes, stay on the rail. If I want to take the inside I tell the other riders. Call out your intentions if you are overtaking someone. "Inside" and leave plenty of room. "Outside" so the other person doesn't get in your way. Do the same for left to left, for example, if you are starting a circle or serpentine and moving off the track.

                    Longing is permitted although I wish it wasn't. The people who longe usually ask first. The ones who are wearing the horse out before mounting usually don't. I change direction so the horses are face to face when they pass, rather than having one overtake the other.

                    We can ride during lessons with the instructor's consent (80x200' indoor). I check with her so I am deferring to the student rider. It often helps them with their steering skills and they learn the etiquette.

                    Keep your speed under control and don't careen all over the place. We have a good rider who is too fast and her direction is unpredictable. She doesn't respect other riders. She almost slammed us broadside into the kickboards recently. She was about 10-15 feet away cantering straight at us. She scared the sxxx out of my horse before I realized why he was starting to bolt. Me, walk/trot! She knows us! Her trainer had just arrived and was yelling at her to start her turns earlier. I watched her for a few minutes. She looks straight ahead not where she is heading. She doesn't turn her center at all, just yanks on the rein when it's almost too late.

                    Our arena can get quite busy without any problems. It is the few people who are self-centered around their own goals. They don't adjust their plan and the rest of us have to avoid them.
                    "With hardly any other living being can a human connect as closely over so many years as a rider can with her horse." Isabell Werth, Four Legs Move My Soul. 2019

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      I agree with Hawks Nest , and my instructors always said that those walking should be on the rail. Especially if the faster person is jumping. Trying to cross the path of the person walking TWICE just to get around them on the outside is extremely dangerous.
                      When going the same direction, passing by the faster rider should always be done on the inside.
                      Slowest gaits stay on the rail, regardless of who's going what direction.
                      If going the same speed in opposite directions, pass left shoulder to left shoulder.

                      If you want some footage of a busy warm up, try this baby:
                      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ehG4L1Xju5A

                      You'll want to ask the video poster for permission to use. It's an old video. In arenas THAT crowded, everyone would do best by going in the same direction.

                      Other typical etiquette expectations:
                      Call where you're going. This doesn't seem to be a common one for dressage, though. I'm a H/J who's doing dressage right now, and I'm always the odd-ball out calling my path ("Inside!") in the warm up at dressage shows. It annoys the heck out of me when people cut me off without saying a word. Just because there's no jumps, that doesn't mean you can't cause problems. I wish dressage people would call their path.
                      If there's even just one rider in the ring, ask before you start lunging. And if they say it's okay, don't lunge for 30 minutes. That's so rude. Max it at 10, or wait until the rider is done riding.
                      Call your arrival when coming through a door/other entrance into the ring.
                      If you knock jumps/poles down, put them back up when you're done (assuming they were set up when you went in).
                      Custom tack racks!
                      www.mmeqcenter.com/tacklove.html

                      Comment

                      • Original Poster

                        #12
                        Originally posted by mmeqcenter View Post

                        If you want some footage of a busy warm up, try this baby:
                        https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ehG4L1Xju5A

                        You'll want to ask the video poster for permission to use. It's an old video. In arenas THAT crowded, everyone would do best by going in the same direction.
                        Thank you!

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Some of it depends on the size of the arena too.

                          Having someone walking on the rail in an already small arena makes things very difficult.

                          At our barn the indoor is quite small. So anyone walking needs to stay on a small circle on the inside. Those moving faster get the outside track. Pass left to left.

                          Our outdoor ring is huge. Anyone walking stays to the outside. Left to left.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by mmeqcenter View Post
                            I agree with [USER="127058"]
                            Other typical etiquette expectations:
                            Call where you're going. This doesn't seem to be a common one for dressage, though. I'm a H/J who's doing dressage right now, and I'm always the odd-ball out calling my path ("Inside!") in the warm up at dressage shows. It annoys the heck out of me when people cut me off without saying a word. Just because there's no jumps, that doesn't mean you can't cause problems. I wish dressage people would call their path.
                            If there's even just one rider in the ring, ask before you start lunging. And if they say it's okay, don't lunge for 30 minutes. That's so rude. Max it at 10, or wait until the rider is done riding.
                            Call your arrival when coming through a door/other entrance into the ring.
                            If you knock jumps/poles down, put them back up when you're done (assuming they were set up when you went in).


                            I ride at a barn where there is a jump team, and a dressage team, it’s coached at times by the same person. I’m always surprised at how quiet the dressage riders are. When I’m schooling and a jumper comes in, even just to flat, they call their intentions, even the kids.
                            "He's not even a good pathological liar." Mara

                            "You're just a very desperate troll, and not even a good one. You're like middle-school troll at best. Like a goblin, not even a troll." et_fig

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Very timely for me.

                              I've always learned that you pass left shoulder to left shoulder, and that if you're not going to do that, you call it out.

                              This seems to be the Pony Club etiquette:

                              https://www.ponyclub.org/ContentDocs...0etiquette.pdf

                              Today I was riding my horse and had been in the outdoor for about 35 minutes and was almost done. As I finished up cantering to the right, two other riders came into the ring. When I finished that circle, as I was walking and changing direction I said to both of them that I was just going to use the far end of the arena for a couple of canter circles to the left and then I'd be done.

                              I made one trot circle as rider # 1 came into the far end where I was, but did turn before she crossed my track. But then, as I asked my horse to canter on the left lead, the second rider trotted (going to her right) and remained on the outside track as she rounded the end of the arena, coming right at me. I yelled "left to left" and she said "I thought you were going to circle." My horse stopped and hers dove towards the inside and we averted a head-on collision by one foot or so.

                              Adrenaline plus.

                              On reflection I recognize that there was clearly some ambiguity in the situation: while I assumed left to left--or even that they might just let me have the end of the arena while I finished the ride-- she heard the word circle and thought I would be making a 10 meter circle at the canter (at least this what I infer she must have thought).

                              This is a pretty small, and not busy barn, so I think that's one of the issues: we have to share infrequently enough that we've never had a discussion of the rules.
                              "The formula 'Two and two make five' is not without its attractions." --Dostoevsky

                              Comment


                              • #16
                                I've been riding for about 30 years, since I've never been able to afford my own horse, just leasing, I've changed barns a lot. My biggest complaint is at the hunter barns were "left to left" is really the only thing that seems to be taught. It's the most basic, but there are a lot of exceptions.

                                Faster horse to the outside - this is because it's harder for horse moving faster to make a tight turn (and worse on their bodies).

                                Figures stay to the inside - this is so other people don't cross your track repeatedly, so Posting Trot, when you called circle, I would have done the same as the other rider, I would stay out on the track, while you yield to the inside, no matter what size circle you're on. While its nice to give one end to someone, sometime your horse needs straight lines (I don't know if that was issue in your case, but I've ridden horses that the first trot has to be a straight line while they limber up).

                                Don't walk on the track - if your warming up/cooling out, give the horses that working the rail (they're probably going faster).

                                Lessons have the right of way - if you are not part of the lesson, listen to what the trainer says so you have an idea of where the lesson is going and stay out of their way if at all possible.

                                Ask before lunging if others are already riding, don't lunge right in the middle of everything.

                                Pay attention to where you "park", if your standing around, tightening your girth, chatting with a friend, make sure you aren't blocking a whole part of the ring.

                                And when in doubt, call! and listen for other peoples calls.

                                Comment

                                • Original Poster

                                  #17
                                  Originally posted by Posting Trot View Post

                                  I made one trot circle as rider # 1 came into the far end where I was, but did turn before she crossed my track. But then, as I asked my horse to canter on the left lead, the second rider trotted (going to her right) and remained on the outside track as she rounded the end of the arena, coming right at me. I yelled "left to left" and she said "I thought you were going to circle." My horse stopped and hers dove towards the inside and we averted a head-on collision by one foot or so.

                                  Adrenaline plus.
                                  Thanks for the Pony Club rules link, I've added it to the blog post!
                                  As for circling, it's customary to do that off the rail, to the inside. No one should get "inside" your circle!
                                  Thanks for reminding me of this, will add too!

                                  Comment

                                  • Original Poster

                                    #18
                                    Thank you everyone!
                                    Here is the resulting blog post: Arena etiquette: Do’s and don’ts of sharing an arena with others

                                    https://jessicaeblack.org/arena-etiquette/

                                    Let me know if I missed anything!
                                    Last edited by jebabacus@yahoo.com; Mar. 22, 2020, 04:07 PM. Reason: edited because there was a random quotation mark...

                                    Comment


                                    • #19
                                      Originally posted by Hawks Nest View Post
                                      I find that the old pass left to left and slower people stay on an inside track is actually truly annoying to me. I much prefer that if you are walking, you stay on the rail and I will work around you. At a trot and canter I can move much faster and easily plan my track around a walking rider and the last thing I want is for them to try to avoid me and because they are slow, end up getting in my way.
                                      A few years ago I moved to a barn with this policy and it was never told to me. All prior barns had given the rail to those moving faster. It was winter and my horse had a lot of coat and so I took frequent walk breaks to allow him to cool off. BO was in the ring teaching one night and took my head off about my walking in the center while her beginners were on the rail. I apologized and kept on the rail for subsequent walk breaks and regretted it when one of the beginners who had minimal steering ability essentially T-Boned me while attempting to "work around" my walking horse. It occurred to me that perhaps I was better at "working around" others than her beginners.

                                      I've been at H/J barns from lesson mills through show barns. At any time, there could be between 6 and 10 jumps set up making passing anywhere but on turns impossible. Jumping outside of lessons was extremely rare.

                                      Generally, lessons (if one is going on) have right of way over those hacking and more experienced riders are expected to be alert to the less so. Courtesy demands that while hacking, a rider be generally aware of instructions given to students, so that they know where people are going. If the lesson riders are going to trot the quarter line or make a circle, I need to know that. It's never fun to jump into a line only to have a clueless rider wander into your track because she didn't listen to the trainer in the ring explain the course since she isn't riding it!

                                      My current barn encourages us to open our mouth and tell people where we are going, when riding indoors, especially. The indoor is small so communication is important. How hard is it to say "I'm going to canter some circles up here?"

                                      The footage of the schooling for medal finals in quite amazing but not typical. First, they are all experienced riders and well trained show horses. There are no jumps in the arena, no beginners, no significant differences in levels of training.



                                      Might I add that at lesson type barns if the instructor in the ring says ALL HALT that people hacking do so? If a student is in danger your extended trot can wait.
                                      Last edited by Linny; Mar. 25, 2020, 12:03 PM.
                                      F O.B
                                      Resident racing historian ~~~ Re-riders Clique
                                      Founder of the Mighty Thoroughbred Clique

                                      Comment


                                      • #20
                                        Crowded or even semi-crowded warm-up rings just make me want to quit showing. ACK. I hate them.
                                        My hopeful road to the 2020 RRP TB Makeover: https://paradoxfarm.blog/

                                        Comment

                                        Working...
                                        X