Sport Horse Spotlight

Zucchero Gold - Wandres, Frederic - 838-BC18_REU2723-foto_reumann

Real Estate Spotlight

467 Charles_1

Sale Spotlight

COTH_without Subscribe
  • Welcome to the Chronicle Forums.
    Please complete your profile. The forums and the rest of www.chronofhorse.com has single sign-in, so your log in information for one will automatically work for the other. Disclaimer: The opinions expressed here are the views of the individual and do not necessarily reflect the views and opinions of The Chronicle of the Horse.

Announcement

Collapse

Forum rules and no-advertising policy

As a participant on this forum, it is your responsibility to know and follow our rules. Please read this message in its entirety.

Board Rules

1. You�re responsible for what you say.
As outlined in Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act, The Chronicle of the Horse and its affiliates, as well Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd., the developers of vBulletin, are not legally responsible for statements made in the Forums.

This is a public forum viewed by a wide spectrum of people, so please be mindful of what you say and who might be reading it�details of personal disputes may be better handled privately. While posters are legally responsible for their statements, the moderators may in their discretion remove or edit posts, though are not legally obligated to do so, regardless of content.

Users have the ability to modify or delete their own messages after posting. Moderators generally will not delete posts, threads or accounts unless they have been alerted and have determined that a post, thread or user has violated the Forums� policies. Moderators do not regularly independently monitor the Forums for such violations.

Profanity, outright vulgarity, blatant personal insults or otherwise inappropriate statements will not be tolerated and will be dealt with at the discretion of the moderators.

Users may provide their positive or negative experiences with or opinions of companies, products, individuals, etc.; however, accounts involving allegations of criminal behavior against named individuals or companies MUST be first-hand accounts and may NOT be made anonymously.

If a situation has been reported upon by a reputable news source or addressed by law enforcement or the legal system it is open for discussion, but if an individual wants to make their own claims of criminal behavior against a named party in the course of that discussion, they too must identify themselves by first and last name and the account must be first-person.

Criminal allegations that do not satisfy these requirements, when brought to our attention, may be removed pending satisfaction of these criteria, and we reserve the right to err on the side of caution when making these determinations.

Credible threats of suicide will be reported to the police along with identifying user information at our disposal, in addition to referring the user to suicide helpline resources such as 1-800-SUICIDE or 1-800-273-TALK.

2. Conversations in horse-related forums should be horse-related.
The forums are a wonderful source of information and support for members of the horse community. While it�s understandably tempting to share information or search for input on other topics upon which members might have a similar level of knowledge, members must maintain the focus on horses.

3. Keep conversations productive, on topic and civil.
Discussion and disagreement are inevitable and encouraged; personal insults, diatribes and sniping comments are unproductive and unacceptable. Whether a subject is light-hearted or serious, keep posts focused on the current topic and of general interest to other participants of that thread. Utilize the private message feature or personal email where appropriate to address side topics or personal issues not related to the topic at large.

4. No advertising in the discussion forums.
Posts in the discussion forums directly or indirectly advertising horses, jobs, items or services for sale or wanted will be removed at the discretion of the moderators. Use of the private messaging feature or email addresses obtained through users� profiles for unsolicited advertising is not permitted.

Company representatives may participate in discussions and answer questions about their products or services, or suggest their products on recent threads if they fulfill the criteria of a query. False "testimonials" provided by company affiliates posing as general consumers are not appropriate, and self-promotion of sales, ad campaigns, etc. through the discussion forums is not allowed.

Paid advertising is available on our classifieds site and through the purchase of banner ads. The tightly monitored Giveaways forum permits free listings of genuinely free horses and items available or wanted (on a limited basis). Items offered for trade are not allowed.

Advertising Policy Specifics
When in doubt of whether something you want to post constitutes advertising, please contact a moderator privately in advance for further clarification. Refer to the following points for general guidelines:

Horses � Only general discussion about the buying, leasing, selling and pricing of horses is permitted. If the post contains, or links to, the type of specific information typically found in a sales or wanted ad, and it�s related to a horse for sale, regardless of who�s selling it, it doesn�t belong in the discussion forums.

Stallions � Board members may ask for suggestions on breeding stallion recommendations. Stallion owners may reply to such queries by suggesting their own stallions, only if their horse fits the specific criteria of the original poster. Excessive promotion of a stallion by its owner or related parties is not permitted and will be addressed at the discretion of the moderators.

Services � Members may use the forums to ask for general recommendations of trainers, barns, shippers, farriers, etc., and other members may answer those requests by suggesting themselves or their company, if their services fulfill the specific criteria of the original post. Members may not solicit other members for business if it is not in response to a direct, genuine query.

Products � While members may ask for general opinions and suggestions on equipment, trailers, trucks, etc., they may not list the specific attributes for which they are in the market, as such posts serve as wanted ads.

Event Announcements � Members may post one notification of an upcoming event that may be of interest to fellow members, if the original poster does not benefit financially from the event. Such threads may not be �bumped� excessively. Premium members may post their own notices in the Event Announcements forum.

Charities/Rescues � Announcements for charitable or fundraising events can only be made for 501(c)(3) tax-exempt organizations. Special exceptions may be made, at the moderators� discretion and direction, for board-related events or fundraising activities in extraordinary circumstances.

Occasional posts regarding horses available for adoption through IRS-registered horse rescue or placement programs are permitted in the appropriate forums, but these threads may be limited at the discretion of the moderators. Individuals may not advertise or make announcements for horses in need of rescue, placement or adoption unless the horse is available through a recognized rescue or placement agency or government-run entity or the thread fits the criteria for and is located in the Giveaways forum.

5. Do not post copyrighted photographs unless you have purchased that photo and have permission to do so.

6. Respect other members.
As members are often passionate about their beliefs and intentions can easily be misinterpreted in this type of environment, try to explore or resolve the inevitable disagreements that arise in the course of threads calmly and rationally.

If you see a post that you feel violates the rules of the board, please click the �alert� button (exclamation point inside of a triangle) in the bottom left corner of the post, which will alert ONLY the moderators to the post in question. They will then take whatever action, or no action, as deemed appropriate for the situation at their discretion. Do not air grievances regarding other posters or the moderators in the discussion forums.

Please be advised that adding another user to your �Ignore� list via your User Control Panel can be a useful tactic, which blocks posts and private messages by members whose commentary you�d rather avoid reading.

7. We have the right to reproduce statements made in the forums.
The Chronicle of the Horse may copy, quote, link to or otherwise reproduce posts, or portions of posts, in print or online for advertising or editorial purposes, if attributed to their original authors, and by posting in this forum, you hereby grant to The Chronicle of the Horse a perpetual, non-exclusive license under copyright and other rights, to do so.

8. We reserve the right to enforce and amend the rules.
The moderators may delete, edit, move or close any post or thread at any time, or refrain from doing any of the foregoing, in their discretion, and may suspend or revoke a user�s membership privileges at any time to maintain adherence to the rules and the general spirit of the forum. These rules may be amended at any time to address the current needs of the board.

Please see our full Terms of Service and Privacy Policy for more information.

Thanks for being a part of the COTH forums!

(Revised 5/9/18)
See more
See less

Any Ideas How To Fix This?

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #21
    I think a ground person is imperative for this one. If you don't have help, it might be time to get help or send the horse to someone else who can have help on the ground. Some horses just need a different approach.

    I second what RainW said above. At the halt, ask the horse to flex to the right or left and have her move forward at the same time. usually when things are difficult, the best thing is to slow the gate down to the lowest possible and start over from there. Start at the halt, then work to walk.

    Another one that would work is the step up exercise. From the halt, as the mare to walk forward into the contact and halt. Once halted, you give the rein, then ask her to step up again after, into the rein and one or 2 steps forward. Repeat multiple times over.

    Another thing to teach the sterring is to use your legs and rein aid on the outside shoulder, including your body position to suggest the turning. Once she learns to turn from our aids other than the rein, you can start adding the rein to the body aids.
    Boss Mare Eventing Blog

    Comment


    • #22
      On the positive side, the mare has shown that she is very trainable and can learn things and will try to do what she's asked. What's been trained can be untrained. The trick is funding out how to communicate to maresy that rules have changed.

      If she has been ridden in a bit I would switch to a sidepull.

      The other thing that might work is line driving from the ground. You could give cues to turn and stay behind pushing. That might break the association with the one rein stop.

      The owner on the other hand is an obsessive idiot who needs way more daily guidance in riding. If you like the mare honestly I'd be tempted to tell owner horse is totally ruined but as a favor you'll buy her for $1 and see if you can fix her .

      I think it is fixable but that idiot owner will create a new problem because they are afraid of horses.

      Comment


      • #23
        I think you've gotten a lot of good advice to at least try.

        I think you might need to take a couple of giant steps backward. Maybe for the next couple of weeks, only ride her a couple of times each week, and otherwise spend time hanging out with the horse and doing some very low level ground work. You could also spend some time teaching her voice commands on the lunge.

        When you do ride her, not using a bit for a while probably makes sense. Just get her going forward again, and responding to voice commands, along with a lot of praise.

        Then add trail riding with one or two other people on very kind and steady horses. Nothing complicated, just out in the world, probably without a bit.

        Then bring her back into the arena for an occasional ride with a bit (without any pressure though), reinforcing the voice commands from the saddle and again, lots of praise.

        And then, maybe, you can try picking up just the lightest possible contact. (And I'm talking about week 6 or so). Lots of praise for even one step forward with any contact at all on the reins.

        Everything just needs to slow down for this horse and let her catch up mentally and do it in a calm way.

        Good luck.
        "The formula 'Two and two make five' is not without its attractions." --Dostoevsky

        Comment


        • #24
          Since your alone, you can use a long line clipped under her jaw, run straight out to a horizontal fence/panel and then back to your hand.
          Very lightly, you can encourage forward with that long line while mounted & you touch the reins.
          Alternatively, you can be on the ground, lead in left hand, reins in right. Encourage forward with lead when you touch reins.
          I do everything alone, so I have lots of lone ideas. I've used the second method, which many do. Haven't done it from saddle, as I haven't needed to.

          Comment


          • #25
            How is she with leg/seat aids? From what I understand, the gist of you having her is that the owner put this one-rein stop on this poor mare so well that she cannot pick up the reins, not even to steer her. So, you teach her leg/seat aids, if she doesn't already have them.

            Then, when she has those down pat, you gradually introduce back in the idea of the leading rein in turning. If she's turning, her feet are moving, and if her feet stay moving, she can't stop. Reward, reward, reward every time she does it right. (Again, saying this because I think those aids may be a hole in her training.)

            Ground driving is also a good idea. At first I thought maybe lunging her in side reins to teach her to accept contact, but I think you are a long way from that, even.

            Comment


            • #26
              Originally posted by danacat View Post
              If I were working with this horse I would get her out of a bridle/bit set up and go with just a halter with two lead ropes as reins -- or something else that does not feel like a bridle to her. Even a bosal as xerochicksuggested, and then work on steering, going forward, stopping with this totally new approach = different pressure that she's not used to.

              Mare sounds quiet enough to trust with no bridle/bit. A change of equipment should break the conditioned response mode she's in. Just my 2 cents too.
              That was my thought as well. Once you get her going again try a mild snaffle and see what happens?

              Comment


              • #27
                Is the owner going to accept that the rein stop is bad for this horse? If not, then I see no point to trying to fix the horse. The horse needs another owner that isn't a CA devotee, and knows what they're doing.

                The way it stands now, anything you do with this poor creature is going to be undone immediately if the owner doesn't stop with her training.
                You can't fix stupid-Ron White

                Comment


                • #28
                  I think it's highly likely that this process is going to take considerable time before the mare is happily going forward with anything close to normal rein handling - like months or even years.

                  I would find a way to trail ride her and assuming she enjoys it, just keep going and going and going until she really believes that her rider is happy to allow her to move. And that nothing but good things happen when she does.

                  When you are ready to "test" whether she can tolerate some rein movement, not only would I use a bosal or side pull or other non-bitted headgear, but I would play with different weights of rein (like string even). Who knows what will be different enough not to trigger her fear/PTSD?

                  Like others, I am grateful to you for taking this mare on. I just hope you can spare her enough time and that her owner can learn at least as quickly as the horse.

                  Comment


                  • #29
                    As others have said, train an opening rein to turn.
                    Presently she only knows one of the rein aids , so all of the rein aids mean to stop for her.
                    She only needs to take one front foot, one step , in the direction of the opening rein , then reward by removing the aid.
                    That's where I would start.

                    Comment

                    • Original Poster

                      #30
                      Today's update! Gotta make it quick.

                      In a bosal I was able to get her to take a few very nervous steps. Just from a stand still with leg pressure she took a single step forward. Once she made that step I rewarded her with a few minutes straight of neck scratches and praise.

                      We got a total of three forward steps around in a small half circle. She is definitely bracing for her mouth to be ripped around, that is evident. But it seems she is associating it more with her mouth than nose face pressure sk it looks like the bosal is the way to go. The session was not long, I felt it best to end her with three amazing steps in a row with affection and a ride ending. Plus, she had relaxed a bit with them. Ending high with her conevidence up was my goal.

                      Owner left today aparently on a trip for the next week, when. She gets back she is going to get a pretty blunt report. I have no issues telling g her how it is, I am ready to. This mare is exceptionally bred. If I had the money I would buy her as a saddle horse if she keeps making good progress like she did today.

                      I may take her out with a few of our retired string horses. A few short rides with the old men would do her good, as it would do them good lol

                      Comment


                      • #31
                        I know you don't have any control over it, but I would not want to see the horse back with the owner. You have to be pretty inexperienced or stupid to get to this point without noticing things are going very wrong along the way. No matter how blunt you are, I can't see the owner understanding how easily she can mess this horse up. The horse sounds very sensitive and keen to please and the owner seems to lack any skills to communicate with the horse. The whole thing makes me very sad, and that's without even bringing CA into it.

                        Comment


                        • #32
                          Oh, God, poor mare. This reminds me of the parelli-istas next door, both more or less terrified of their horses. Rode with both once, trail ride in the woods on our adjacent properties. The more terrified rider kept begging her mare to slow down by bleating woah, woah, woah. Little aged QH mare without a mean bone in her body, walking calmly but energetically. Rider also kept asking where are we, are we lost. No, you're a quarter mile from the barn. You cannot get lost unless the horse dumps you and the rest of us up and leave you here.

                          That woman knew she was being run away with and would die in the wilderness. Her previous horse had enough spunk to put his hood down and start running over her when he saw her coming with the carrot stick

                          Comment


                          • #33
                            Hmmm...I've had some problems with horses like this. First thing I would do is check her teeth and make sure I have the softest bit possible. I just retrained a gelding that wouldn't go forward with a simple snaffle--I sold the horse originally and he went fine for anyone in a plain dee bit. He came back so backed off, wouldn't go forward, etc. I ended up having to switch him to a rubber dog bone bit. If that didn't resolve the issue, I might then just do ground driving with her, first off a caveson then off the bit. I would also longe her off the bit--line run through near ring, over pole, and hooked to other ring. If all that did not work, then I would switch and use clicker training to retrain her. I had one that learned if he bucked at the canter he would have a one-rein stop...and he thought it was a great way to get out of work. You ask him to canter, he'd canter a couple of steps, then throw a buck, expecting you would do a one-rein stop and then he could stand. That one I fixed by applying a dressage whip when he bucked, and not stopping him. You have to see what will work for each horse.

                            Comment


                            • #34
                              Regarding the owner, she made a mistake that I'd bet money we've ALL made at one time or another, and that's over-reliance on a normal and practical equestrian tool. The "one rein stop" is a procedure to be used when a regular stop cue and aid don't work. To include it in the "tool box" is a Good Thing for a rider to do. But to overuse that tool is a Bad Thing.

                              I'd also wager that ALL of us have followed some guru down a "garden path" until we realized we were going in a wrong direction. It's mistake that is common in new riders and it's a mistake the guru community encourages because that's how they make their living. A pox on the gurus who do that, but don't blame an inexperienced victim of the guru for being naive.

                              The above said, it's time for the owner to become an "adult horsewoman" and forswear the foolishness of gurus. She has to know and understand what she did but it has to be explained without coating the explanation with a thick gel of "moral fault" or "guilt." Give her the benefit of the doubt that what she did was without malice. It was a mistake, not a sin. But even if no sin was involved she still has to be responsible for her mistakes. She assumes that responsibility by fixing her mistakes, not dwelling on them. As any of us would have to do in a similar situation.

                              As for the horse, use of a non-bit device for the foreseeable future is likely a Very Good idea. If bosal works then use it. There are other devices (sidepull, hackemore, halter and two lead ropes, etc.) that could also be tried. Then pick the one that works the best.

                              The OP got one step. Well, isn't that how long journeys begin? Good on her for figuring out how to get that first step. Then she got a second, and then a third, etc. OUTSTANDING! What she's doing works. May she successfully do lots of it.

                              Something I'd add during the time she still has is getting someone to video her while she works on the horse and then give that video to the owner so that she SEES this new way of doing things. Indeed working with the OP for a few rides would be beneficial. If she's been a CA devotee it may take some time for her to unwind her prior learning. Sometimes these people are found in groups in a barn. If there are other CA types that she has been working/riding with then she probably needs to move someplace else. If she goes back to the CA group they will likely treat her as a traitor, apostate, and candidate to be burned the a metaphorical stake. As noted it will only take ONE TIME to revert the horse back to it's undesired behavior until the new, desired behaviors are set in the horse's mind. We all know that you can't erase anything from a horse's memory. You can only lay new memories over the top. The OP should, gently, inquire along these lines and give sound advice.

                              I wish the OP and owner success as they go forward!

                              G.

                              ETA: What is the owner's level of horsemanship skill? Did she overuse the one rein stop because she has a poor, insecure seat and was constantly worried about coming off? That is NOT an uncommon circumstance. Watching her ride another horse might give some clues as to why she felt the need to constantly be "checking" the horse.

                              Don't you just love "onion class" problems?

                              G.
                              Mangalarga Marchador: Uma Raa, Uma Paixo

                              Comment


                              • #35
                                Originally posted by pluvinel View Post
                                Work in hand
                                yup. as always, wise advice.

                                She's been one rein stopped to death from the saddle. Working on the ground in hand is just different enough that she might try to listen to you.

                                Work in a halter first with real reins clipped to the sides, so she feels you picking up and handling the reins while she walks. First just get her to walk while you handle the reins with zero pressure on the halter, just handle the reins so she might disassociate rein handling with stopping.

                                When she will move forward and accept light "noise" from you, then you can start using the reins to steer from the ground. Be creative if she gets stuck, like using laterals or SI, it might be different enough for her to want to try for you.

                                Once she has an understanding of steering in a halter, I'd have her wear her bridle, but put a halter over the bridle and still work in hand using just the halter, but let her have the feel of a bit in her mouth. When she's going good, I'd experiment by clipping the rein onto the bit and trying. Maybe even just one side at a time on the bit. For a habit this ingrained you have to go very slow and be very thorough.

                                Be sure you have her going willingly in hand before swinging a leg over and attempting to touch the reins.

                                If she goes nicely with no rein, I'd still ride her of course, but don't expect anything acheived on the ground to carry over to the saddle until its confirmed on the ground. Testing the waters part way through may set you back with a mare this dedicated to doing the right thing.

                                She sounds like a lovely girl with a heart of gold who is trying her heart out to understand and oblige to the best of her capacity. Best of luck.
                                Being terrible at something is the first step to being truly great at it. Struggle is the evidence of progress.

                                Comment


                                • #36
                                  I would just try an opening rein. Very very open,no direct pressure. Maybe with someone leading on the ground to help her follow her nose. Treats might help too.

                                  What fkn idiots, btw.
                                  It's fine to follow whatever method but the complete absence of common sense to take it to this extreme is just mind boggling.
                                  The Noodlehttp://tiny.cc/NGKmT&http://tiny.cc/gioSA
                                  Jinxyhttp://tiny.cc/PIC798&http://tiny.cc/jinx364
                                  Boy Wonderhttp://tiny.cc/G9290
                                  The Hana is nuts! NUTS!!http://tinyurl.com/SOCRAZY

                                  Comment


                                  • #37
                                    Originally posted by Abbie.S View Post

                                    This is exactly why his methodology is absolute and utter garbage. Too little too late for this poor mare, but seriously, without sounding entirely exasperated, this is a fantastic example of the road to hell is paved with good intentions.
                                    I watched a set of CA DVDs and learned how to round pen my horses and get inside turns from them. A good exercise out of the usual work we do, and helpful in fine tuning the communication between us.

                                    So if you don't go straight off the deep end with all the feel of an anvil and take it to the dumbest possible extremes, they are perfectly fine methods.
                                    The Noodlehttp://tiny.cc/NGKmT&http://tiny.cc/gioSA
                                    Jinxyhttp://tiny.cc/PIC798&http://tiny.cc/jinx364
                                    Boy Wonderhttp://tiny.cc/G9290
                                    The Hana is nuts! NUTS!!http://tinyurl.com/SOCRAZY

                                    Comment


                                    • #38
                                      Originally posted by buck22 View Post

                                      yup. as always, wise advice.

                                      She's been one rein stopped to death from the saddle. Working on the ground in hand is just different enough that she might try to listen to you.

                                      Work in a halter first with real reins clipped to the sides, so she feels you picking up and handling the reins while she walks. First just get her to walk while you handle the reins with zero pressure on the halter, just handle the reins so she might disassociate rein handling with stopping.

                                      When she will move forward and accept light "noise" from you, then you can start using the reins to steer from the ground. Be creative if she gets stuck, like using laterals or SI, it might be different enough for her to want to try for you.

                                      Once she has an understanding of steering in a halter, I'd have her wear her bridle, but put a halter over the bridle and still work in hand using just the halter, but let her have the feel of a bit in her mouth. When she's going good, I'd experiment by clipping the rein onto the bit and trying. Maybe even just one side at a time on the bit. For a habit this ingrained you have to go very slow and be very thorough. (!!!!!)

                                      Be sure you have her going willingly in hand before swinging a leg over and attempting to touch the reins.

                                      If she goes nicely with no rein, I'd still ride her of course, but don't expect anything acheived on the ground to carry over to the saddle until its confirmed on the ground. Testing the waters part way through may set you back with a mare this dedicated to doing the right thing.

                                      She sounds like a lovely girl with a heart of gold who is trying her heart out to understand and oblige to the best of her capacity. Best of luck.
                                      Great explanations!
                                      Do not confuse motion and progress. A rocking horse keeps moving but does not make any progress.
                                      Alfred A. Montapert

                                      Comment


                                      • #39
                                        Originally posted by buck22 View Post

                                        yup. as always, wise advice.

                                        She's been one rein stopped to death from the saddle. Working on the ground in hand is just different enough that she might try to listen to you.

                                        Work in a halter first with real reins clipped to the sides, so she feels you picking up and handling the reins while she walks. First just get her to walk while you handle the reins with zero pressure on the halter, just handle the reins so she might disassociate rein handling with stopping.

                                        When she will move forward and accept light "noise" from you, then you can start using the reins to steer from the ground. Be creative if she gets stuck, like using laterals or SI, it might be different enough for her to want to try for you.

                                        Once she has an understanding of steering in a halter, I'd have her wear her bridle, but put a halter over the bridle and still work in hand using just the halter, but let her have the feel of a bit in her mouth. When she's going good, I'd experiment by clipping the rein onto the bit and trying. Maybe even just one side at a time on the bit. For a habit this ingrained you have to go very slow and be very thorough.

                                        Be sure you have her going willingly in hand before swinging a leg over and attempting to touch the reins.

                                        If she goes nicely with no rein, I'd still ride her of course, but don't expect anything acheived on the ground to carry over to the saddle until its confirmed on the ground. Testing the waters part way through may set you back with a mare this dedicated to doing the right thing.

                                        She sounds like a lovely girl with a heart of gold who is trying her heart out to understand and oblige to the best of her capacity. Best of luck.
                                        I like all of this.

                                        Comment


                                        • #40
                                          If it were me, I would treat the horse like it’s the very first ride. The first excercise I would do is one of those flexions, but add a little inside leg to see if you can get the horse to move the hind quarters. Do it on both sides and see if you can make your circle a little bigger. Next I would work on your forward momentum. I’d let the horse trot/ canter wherever he wanted and then maybe pick up your rein to suggest he goes where you ask, and if he does, release and let him walk after a few strides. Don’t focus on contact yet because he doesn’t know what that is. If you can’t steer at the walk, trot, and canter, forget about asking for contact.

                                          Once you get to the point where you can wtc and steer, then focus on backing. Get him to where he’ll shift his weight backwards when you just close your fingers. Then add a little leg and see if you can get him to still shift backwards but take a stride forward. Then 2 strides, then 3, and so on until you can hold a little contact at a wtc.

                                          For those horses that are really shut down, like mustangs, and really introverted ones, and ones like CA and parelli screwups, it can really help to add a little +R into your training. I’m by no means a +R enthusiast but some of those CA horses get shut down because they’re just so afraid to get the wrong answer, that they just stop trying all together. If this horse is not responding well to CA methods, -R is probably not how he learns best. Try to swing the complete opposite direction and see what happens.

                                          Comment

                                          Working...
                                          X