Sport Horse Spotlight

Feinrich-Nr_1-12-18-10-074 Beelitz

Real Estate Spotlight

Sale Spotlight

COTH_without Subscribe
  • Welcome to the Chronicle Forums.
    Please complete your profile. The forums and the rest of www.chronofhorse.com has single sign-in, so your log in information for one will automatically work for the other. Disclaimer: The opinions expressed here are the views of the individual and do not necessarily reflect the views and opinions of The Chronicle of the Horse.

Announcement

Collapse

Forum rules and no-advertising policy

As a participant on this forum, it is your responsibility to know and follow our rules. Please read this message in its entirety.

Board Rules

1. You�re responsible for what you say.
As outlined in Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act, The Chronicle of the Horse and its affiliates, as well Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd., the developers of vBulletin, are not legally responsible for statements made in the Forums.

This is a public forum viewed by a wide spectrum of people, so please be mindful of what you say and who might be reading it�details of personal disputes may be better handled privately. While posters are legally responsible for their statements, the moderators may in their discretion remove or edit posts, though are not legally obligated to do so, regardless of content.

Users have the ability to modify or delete their own messages after posting. Moderators generally will not delete posts, threads or accounts unless they have been alerted and have determined that a post, thread or user has violated the Forums� policies. Moderators do not regularly independently monitor the Forums for such violations.

Profanity, outright vulgarity, blatant personal insults or otherwise inappropriate statements will not be tolerated and will be dealt with at the discretion of the moderators.

Users may provide their positive or negative experiences with or opinions of companies, products, individuals, etc.; however, accounts involving allegations of criminal behavior against named individuals or companies MUST be first-hand accounts and may NOT be made anonymously.

If a situation has been reported upon by a reputable news source or addressed by law enforcement or the legal system it is open for discussion, but if an individual wants to make their own claims of criminal behavior against a named party in the course of that discussion, they too must identify themselves by first and last name and the account must be first-person.

Criminal allegations that do not satisfy these requirements, when brought to our attention, may be removed pending satisfaction of these criteria, and we reserve the right to err on the side of caution when making these determinations.

Credible threats of suicide will be reported to the police along with identifying user information at our disposal, in addition to referring the user to suicide helpline resources such as 1-800-SUICIDE or 1-800-273-TALK.

2. Conversations in horse-related forums should be horse-related.
The forums are a wonderful source of information and support for members of the horse community. While it�s understandably tempting to share information or search for input on other topics upon which members might have a similar level of knowledge, members must maintain the focus on horses.

3. Keep conversations productive, on topic and civil.
Discussion and disagreement are inevitable and encouraged; personal insults, diatribes and sniping comments are unproductive and unacceptable. Whether a subject is light-hearted or serious, keep posts focused on the current topic and of general interest to other participants of that thread. Utilize the private message feature or personal email where appropriate to address side topics or personal issues not related to the topic at large.

4. No advertising in the discussion forums.
Posts in the discussion forums directly or indirectly advertising horses, jobs, items or services for sale or wanted will be removed at the discretion of the moderators. Use of the private messaging feature or email addresses obtained through users� profiles for unsolicited advertising is not permitted.

Company representatives may participate in discussions and answer questions about their products or services, or suggest their products on recent threads if they fulfill the criteria of a query. False "testimonials" provided by company affiliates posing as general consumers are not appropriate, and self-promotion of sales, ad campaigns, etc. through the discussion forums is not allowed.

Paid advertising is available on our classifieds site and through the purchase of banner ads. The tightly monitored Giveaways forum permits free listings of genuinely free horses and items available or wanted (on a limited basis). Items offered for trade are not allowed.

Advertising Policy Specifics
When in doubt of whether something you want to post constitutes advertising, please contact a moderator privately in advance for further clarification. Refer to the following points for general guidelines:

Horses � Only general discussion about the buying, leasing, selling and pricing of horses is permitted. If the post contains, or links to, the type of specific information typically found in a sales or wanted ad, and it�s related to a horse for sale, regardless of who�s selling it, it doesn�t belong in the discussion forums.

Stallions � Board members may ask for suggestions on breeding stallion recommendations. Stallion owners may reply to such queries by suggesting their own stallions, only if their horse fits the specific criteria of the original poster. Excessive promotion of a stallion by its owner or related parties is not permitted and will be addressed at the discretion of the moderators.

Services � Members may use the forums to ask for general recommendations of trainers, barns, shippers, farriers, etc., and other members may answer those requests by suggesting themselves or their company, if their services fulfill the specific criteria of the original post. Members may not solicit other members for business if it is not in response to a direct, genuine query.

Products � While members may ask for general opinions and suggestions on equipment, trailers, trucks, etc., they may not list the specific attributes for which they are in the market, as such posts serve as wanted ads.

Event Announcements � Members may post one notification of an upcoming event that may be of interest to fellow members, if the original poster does not benefit financially from the event. Such threads may not be �bumped� excessively. Premium members may post their own notices in the Event Announcements forum.

Charities/Rescues � Announcements for charitable or fundraising events can only be made for 501(c)(3) tax-exempt organizations. Special exceptions may be made, at the moderators� discretion and direction, for board-related events or fundraising activities in extraordinary circumstances.

Occasional posts regarding horses available for adoption through IRS-registered horse rescue or placement programs are permitted in the appropriate forums, but these threads may be limited at the discretion of the moderators. Individuals may not advertise or make announcements for horses in need of rescue, placement or adoption unless the horse is available through a recognized rescue or placement agency or government-run entity or the thread fits the criteria for and is located in the Giveaways forum.

5. Do not post copyrighted photographs unless you have purchased that photo and have permission to do so.

6. Respect other members.
As members are often passionate about their beliefs and intentions can easily be misinterpreted in this type of environment, try to explore or resolve the inevitable disagreements that arise in the course of threads calmly and rationally.

If you see a post that you feel violates the rules of the board, please click the �alert� button (exclamation point inside of a triangle) in the bottom left corner of the post, which will alert ONLY the moderators to the post in question. They will then take whatever action, or no action, as deemed appropriate for the situation at their discretion. Do not air grievances regarding other posters or the moderators in the discussion forums.

Please be advised that adding another user to your �Ignore� list via your User Control Panel can be a useful tactic, which blocks posts and private messages by members whose commentary you�d rather avoid reading.

7. We have the right to reproduce statements made in the forums.
The Chronicle of the Horse may copy, quote, link to or otherwise reproduce posts, or portions of posts, in print or online for advertising or editorial purposes, if attributed to their original authors, and by posting in this forum, you hereby grant to The Chronicle of the Horse a perpetual, non-exclusive license under copyright and other rights, to do so.

8. We reserve the right to enforce and amend the rules.
The moderators may delete, edit, move or close any post or thread at any time, or refrain from doing any of the foregoing, in their discretion, and may suspend or revoke a user�s membership privileges at any time to maintain adherence to the rules and the general spirit of the forum. These rules may be amended at any time to address the current needs of the board.

Please see our full Terms of Service and Privacy Policy for more information.

Thanks for being a part of the COTH forums!

(Revised 5/9/18)
See more
See less

Are vet checks necessary?

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #41
    No they aren't a must to find a healthy, sound , useful horse you will be happy with. Horses were ( and still are) bought and sold for a long time without them and both buyer and seller came out of the deal a winner.

    People do a PPE and some still manage to end up with a lame, or neurological, or sick horse anyways.

    You just need to do what makes you feel comfortable in the buying process. Just be prepared that there is still a chance you could end up with an issue. Nothing is guaranteed.

    I've never done a PPE and never bought a bad horse either, so I guess I have been fortunate.

    Comment


    • #42
      PPEs are rather new for the run of the mill horse buyers.
      Not that long ago we didn't have the technology to easily learn that much on a PPE and what we had was really expensive.

      Not to do a PPE today is taking a gamble we used to take by default.
      Not necessarily smart today not to use that little bit of an edge when buying a horse.

      With the cost of horses increasing and the upkeep so much higher, to have one more way to decide if that horse we are looking to buy has something wrong with it we can't tell by looking and guessing only that all is ok as we used to is a huge improvement for a buyer.

      Who needs the financial and emotional heartache of buying a horse that we thought was fine and a few months later shows up with something serious, that could have been easily ruled out with a basic PPE today?
      There is plenty we still can't learn from a PPE, but our chances that we get it right and the horse is suitably sound are increased with one.

      Just because we have taken our chances all our lives doesn't mean that we can't learn to do better today.
      Especially as a trainer helping a client buy a suitable horse.

      Comment


      • #43
        PPEs only report the status of the horse at that particular moment. As we all know, horses are horses and can have their PPE done, come through with flying colors, and then get turned out and break themselves, or colic, or get bitten by a lyme-carrying tick. PPEs are not necessarily predictors of what you will have 1 day, 1 week, 1 month, 1 year down the line.

        That being said, I did PPEs on all three of the horses I bought. I just wanted to know, to the best I could know, what I was purchasing.

        Comment


        • #44
          At certain price tags, they are required if you want to get the horse insured for $$$ amount.

          For those who aren’t spending big bucks on the horse, the purchase price and PPE cost will be the least expensive part of owning a horse. PPEs aren’t absolute predictors but they are a good way to avoid buying an easily discoverable problem that might make the horse unsuitable for your needs. They should always be considered in relation to the horse’s age, performance history (if any), temperament suitability, and the buyer’s performance goals.

          The PPE doesn’t just look for lameness or potential lameness. You check eyes, heart, teeth, respiration, overall body condition. Things like is the horse a roarer? The exam can be basic or extensive.

          If you can only have one horse and it needs to be a performance horse and your care budget is tight, it is worth it to save for a pretty thorough PPE. It can save you in the long run. And the one you don’t buy based on the PPE will be expensive but so much less expensive than it might have been if you hadn’t done a check.

          Comment


          • #45
            I'm wondering if any of the more experienced horse buyers and sellers on this board have an estimate of how often something is discovered in the PPE that stops the sale. It seems to me that statistic gives some idea of the value of a PPE. If it's only 1 in 100 where some hidden problem is discovered, a buyer might conclude it's worth the gamble to skip a PPE.

            As a parent who has seen a lot of horses come in for trials and PPEs at our hunter jumper barn, my impression is that it's quite often something is discovered in a PPE that thwarts the sale. We had 2 "perfect gentleman," seemingly sound horses at the barn on trial--one turned out to have a heart defect that could cause sudden death, and the other had something bad with the coffin joint. We had a mare where a chronic suspensory was discovered on the PPE--she was moving nicely but the vet detected it during the lameness exam. If I had to guess, I'd say at least 25% of purchases go south on the PPE, but that's a rough guess based on a very small sample, so I'd love to hear what others think.

            Comment


            • #46
              Originally posted by Horsegirl's Mom View Post
              I'm wondering if any of the more experienced horse buyers and sellers on this board have an estimate of how often something is discovered in the PPE that stops the sale. It seems to me that statistic gives some idea of the value of a PPE. If it's only 1 in 100 where some hidden problem is discovered, a buyer might conclude it's worth the gamble to skip a PPE.

              As a parent who has seen a lot of horses come in for trials and PPEs at our hunter jumper barn, my impression is that it's quite often something is discovered in a PPE that thwarts the sale. We had 2 "perfect gentleman," seemingly sound horses at the barn on trial--one turned out to have a heart defect that could cause sudden death, and the other had something bad with the coffin joint. We had a mare where a chronic suspensory was discovered on the PPE--she was moving nicely but the vet detected it during the lameness exam. If I had to guess, I'd say at least 25% of purchases go south on the PPE, but that's a rough guess based on a very small sample, so I'd love to hear what others think.
              Last three performance horses we looked to buy, two vets found something that made them unsuitable for us.
              We bought the third one.

              Last two horses we sold, PPE found small possible problems.
              PPE vets said that was there, may never cause any problems.
              That meant price had to be lowered on one because of those questions PPE brought up.
              The buyers liked them well enough to buy them anyway.

              A PPE is only done after you are sure you want that horse, as a last check, not up in front.
              As such, it can be a deal breaker if something is found that you don't want to take a chance with.

              PPE is but one more tool in the buyer's corner, a handy one, use it.

              Comment


              • #47
                Originally posted by Horsegirl's Mom View Post
                I'm wondering if any of the more experienced horse buyers and sellers on this board have an estimate of how often something is discovered in the PPE that stops the sale. It seems to me that statistic gives some idea of the value of a PPE. If it's only 1 in 100 where some hidden problem is discovered, a buyer might conclude it's worth the gamble to skip a PPE.

                As a parent who has seen a lot of horses come in for trials and PPEs at our hunter jumper barn, my impression is that it's quite often something is discovered in a PPE that thwarts the sale. We had 2 "perfect gentleman," seemingly sound horses at the barn on trial--one turned out to have a heart defect that could cause sudden death, and the other had something bad with the coffin joint. We had a mare where a chronic suspensory was discovered on the PPE--she was moving nicely but the vet detected it during the lameness exam. If I had to guess, I'd say at least 25% of purchases go south on the PPE, but that's a rough guess based on a very small sample, so I'd love to hear what others think.
                A horse “passed” (I hate that word for it but whatever) a PPE for the job the buyer wants. So for example, you get a PPE for a horse for your daughter to do the 3’6” hunters. Horse is not recommended by the vet to do that job. I vet the same horse for trail riding (lets pretend I have more money than sense) vet endorses that. Same PPE results but I get a green light to purchase because of my intended use of the horse.

                PPEs let you see where the horse is at that moment. They can and do cancel a sale. However that is dependent upon what the buyer wants the horse for. If buyer A wants the horse to be competitive in the A/Os and buyer B wants that same horse for say fox hunting the vet may recommend passing for buyer A but not for buyer B because of intended purpose.

                Comment


                • #48
                  Originally posted by Horsegirl's Mom View Post
                  I'm wondering if any of the more experienced horse buyers and sellers on this board have an estimate of how often something is discovered in the PPE that stops the sale. It seems to me that statistic gives some idea of the value of a PPE. If it's only 1 in 100 where some hidden problem is discovered, a buyer might conclude it's worth the gamble to skip a PPE.

                  As a parent who has seen a lot of horses come in for trials and PPEs at our hunter jumper barn, my impression is that it's quite often something is discovered in a PPE that thwarts the sale. We had 2 "perfect gentleman," seemingly sound horses at the barn on trial--one turned out to have a heart defect that could cause sudden death, and the other had something bad with the coffin joint. We had a mare where a chronic suspensory was discovered on the PPE--she was moving nicely but the vet detected it during the lameness exam. If I had to guess, I'd say at least 25% of purchases go south on the PPE, but that's a rough guess based on a very small sample, so I'd love to hear what others think.
                  With the caveat that intended purpose is very relevant, and mine is strenuous, I've had to vet between 4 and 10 horses before purchasing one - so 75% to 90% are not purchased as a result of input from the vet. Some of those the vet never puts hands on, because I email the video of the trial ride and there is a visible lameness. Many go south on the physical exam or lameness/ridden exam. Very rarely do we make it all the way to imaging and walk away because of something we find on an x-ray or ultrasound, although it has happened.

                  I've had many conversations where the vet said something like, "I'd recommend this horse if you were looking to keep him at his current level, but have concerns about his ability to move up to the level you need him to."

                  Comment


                  • #49
                    I would expect an uneducated buyer to think they’re unnecessary.

                    A pro? Let’s just say that I think you need to find a competent trainer before you buy a horse.
                    Show me your horse and I will tell you who you are.

                    Comment


                    • #50
                      Originally posted by Denali6298 View Post

                      A horse “passed” (I hate that word for it but whatever) a PPE for the job the buyer wants. So for example, you get a PPE for a horse for your daughter to do the 3’6” hunters. Horse is not recommended by the vet to do that job. I vet the same horse for trail riding (lets pretend I have more money than sense) vet endorses that. Same PPE results but I get a green light to purchase because of my intended use of the horse.

                      PPEs let you see where the horse is at that moment. They can and do cancel a sale. However that is dependent upon what the buyer wants the horse for. If buyer A wants the horse to be competitive in the A/Os and buyer B wants that same horse for say fox hunting the vet may recommend passing for buyer A but not for buyer B because of intended purpose.
                      Denali for the Win on the best example of PPE utility!!!

                      The rule of Horses for Courses is still quite valid.

                      G.
                      Mangalarga Marchador: Uma Raa, Uma Paixo

                      Comment


                      • #51
                        I know someone that spent a lot of money importing an expensive horse. Didn't do a PPE, felt they'd already spent too much money. Horse had cervical arthritis and is now a (very expensive) pasture pet. I would never purchase a horse without some level of PPE.

                        Based on her poor advice, I think I'd be looking for a different trainer, too.

                        Comment


                        • #52
                          Originally posted by Horsegirl's Mom View Post
                          I'm wondering if any of the more experienced horse buyers and sellers on this board have an estimate of how often something is discovered in the PPE that stops the sale. It seems to me that statistic gives some idea of the value of a PPE. If it's only 1 in 100 where some hidden problem is discovered, a buyer might conclude it's worth the gamble to skip a PPE.

                          As a parent who has seen a lot of horses come in for trials and PPEs at our hunter jumper barn, my impression is that it's quite often something is discovered in a PPE that thwarts the sale. We had 2 "perfect gentleman," seemingly sound horses at the barn on trial--one turned out to have a heart defect that could cause sudden death, and the other had something bad with the coffin joint. We had a mare where a chronic suspensory was discovered on the PPE--she was moving nicely but the vet detected it during the lameness exam. If I had to guess, I'd say at least 25% of purchases go south on the PPE, but that's a rough guess based on a very small sample, so I'd love to hear what others think.
                          Let's see, out of the five horses that I've purchased, there were two that I had vetted that I passed on because there were issues I did not want to live with. There were three others that never made it the official vetting because there were subtle things about the way they moved that I didn't like or that my vet friend or trainer saw on the video.

                          No horse will be perfect, but your goals and your tolerance for risk are critical. Where you buy a horse from is also part of the equation. Most of the horses I've bought have been from people I know and trust. A few years ago someone I know bought a horse from a sales barn with a sketchy reputation. I told her to do films and draw blood at the PPE. She declined because of expense. That horse put two people in the hospital a few weeks later. By then it was too late to know if it had a long-term tranquilizer in its system. The sales barn took the horse back and offered some credit toward a new horse. She walked away and lost the full purchase price but at least she wasn't stuck with the horse.
                          Equine Ink - My soapbox for equestrian writings & reviews.
                          EquestrianHow2 - Operating instructions for your horse.

                          Comment


                          • #53
                            I have purchased horses without a PPE, but was lucky. Id rather spend $300 than $3000 and find out the horse had something glaringly wrong. to me, it is about the age and price of the horse and how much work it has had. If I have room in my barn and it is a young horse with no work, maybe. Too many times it is about what you can live with, as in, a horse I looked at was sound but had bone chips in her knees. Maybe fine for backyard, but not for hunting. I'd rather spend the money and know what I am dealing with, and know that it might not reveal everything that might happen, but at least you know.
                            If I am looking at spending over a certain amount, I want everything. If it is a cheaper horse, just a basic PPE will do.
                            Believe me, if you buy a horse without a PPE and it has ringbone, you are screwed. Just an example.

                            Comment


                            • #54
                              You don't need a PPE if you have the wherewithal to keep the horse regardless of its health condition or a willingness to put the horse down if you are unable too support it in its chronic state. A basic PPE is pretty helpful for identifying many common potential problems. If you can't afford a PPE, it's not a great idea to buy a horse. Any trainer who does not recommend a PPE is not doing the buyer any favors.
                              Where Norwegian Fjords Rule
                              http://www.ironwood-farm.com

                              Comment


                              • #55
                                Originally posted by Horsegirl's Mom View Post
                                I'm wondering if any of the more experienced horse buyers and sellers on this board have an estimate of how often something is discovered in the PPE that stops the sale. It seems to me that statistic gives some idea of the value of a PPE. If it's only 1 in 100 where some hidden problem is discovered, a buyer might conclude it's worth the gamble to skip a PPE.
                                The majority of horses that I had PPE's done on failed (I've been horse shopping five times in the last 15 years), as in had something seriously wrong and prevented them from being a trail horse.
                                In memory of Apache, who loved to play. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MjZAqeg7HyE

                                Comment


                                • #56
                                  ^ but then don’t we all know some horses who “failed” one or more PPEs due to issues that should have been career ending and yet the horse continued to perform soundly for many years? I personally know quite a few in this category. Most were mature horses with some wear and tear from an athletic life.

                                  That said, I do think PPEs are a good idea (though I haven’t always followed this advice myself). One thing that surprises me is how often some people will vet pretty obviously lame horses or continue to pursue extensive diagnostics on a horse they don’t yet own to discover the exact cause. You can stop a PPE without going down ever rabbit hole and I think it is a good idea to have some cut off points for various /common findings in mind before you get started.

                                  Comment


                                  • #57
                                    Originally posted by RiderInTheRain View Post
                                    ^ but then don’t we all know some horses who “failed” one or more PPEs due to issues that should have been career ending and yet the horse continued to perform soundly for many years? I personally know quite a few in this category. Most were mature horses with some wear and tear from an athletic life.

                                    That said, I do think PPEs are a good idea (though I haven’t always followed this advice myself). One thing that surprises me is how often some people will vet pretty obviously lame horses or continue to pursue extensive diagnostics on a horse they don’t yet own to discover the exact cause. You can stop a PPE without going down ever rabbit hole and I think it is a good idea to have some cut off points for various /common findings in mind before you get started.
                                    Well my current horse occasionally, slightly, bobbed her head while being lunged during the PPE (I never saw it during the two times I rode her). Turned out it was due to her bone chip, so the sellers dropped the price and I used that money to have my vet remove the chip. She's been fine ever since and I've had her for two years.

                                    I'm just an amateur rider, and I do take someone with me when I look at horses but there's still stuff I don't know or will miss. Neurological disorders can be hard to spot, but a PPE will find them. You really don't want a neurological horse.
                                    In memory of Apache, who loved to play. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MjZAqeg7HyE

                                    Comment


                                    • #58
                                      Lots depends on intended use. If you have one, it is as important to pull urine and blood as much as is the physical. That seems to cause all kinds of amusing stories of accidentally giving meds to the wrong horse, through all types of price tags and situations.

                                      Comment


                                      • #59
                                        Originally posted by Lexibrooke1 View Post
                                        I'm not really sure why my trainer thought they weren't necessary, though she did say that another student she helped find a horse for ended up spending $1,200 on a vet check, which I have no intention of doing. I plan on just getting a basic check done, though I will have to contact my vet and figure out how much that will cost. The last thing I want to do is buy a horse that ends up being unusable for my purposes because I skimped on the vetting. Thank you all for the advice.


                                        NEXT on that "trainer". She would absolutely fail a trainer's PPE. She's LAME! Find a trainer who has your best interest in mind and has the knowledge to actually help you find a suitable and usable horse. This one doesn't have those basics. If she doesn't know the value of a PPE, what other totally wrong things is she promoting to her students?

                                        The purpose of a pre-purchase exam is to unveil any defects in the horse that will prevent it from performing it's intended job, and so that you don't buy a money pit lemon that you end up having to pay retirement board on, give away or put down. The more thorough your PPE, the more confidence you can have that you are not buying a horse that has big problems.

                                        Your "trainer" needs a lot of training herself. She recommends no PPE? WTH? Next, she'll be scamming you into buying her horse that wouldn't pass a PPE. Would you rather spend $800-$1000 on a PPE with some xrays and not buy the $2500 horse, or spend $300 on a basic exam, buy the $2500 horse only to find out a year and $6,000 in basic maintenance later to discover after $1,500 in vet bills that the horse has career-ending problems? Then you're out at least $10,300, but probably more, and you still don't have a ridable horse.

                                        So, what do you consider to be a basic check? Vitals, and lameness exam? If the horse flexed a 2 on one leg that day, do you walk away, buy it, or come back another day for another $300 basic exam?

                                        Comment


                                        • #60
                                          Originally posted by Horsegirl's Mom View Post
                                          I'm wondering if any of the more experienced horse buyers and sellers on this board have an estimate of how often something is discovered in the PPE that stops the sale. It seems to me that statistic gives some idea of the value of a PPE. If it's only 1 in 100 where some hidden problem is discovered, a buyer might conclude it's worth the gamble to skip a PPE.

                                          As a parent who has seen a lot of horses come in for trials and PPEs at our hunter jumper barn, my impression is that it's quite often something is discovered in a PPE that thwarts the sale. We had 2 "perfect gentleman," seemingly sound horses at the barn on trial--one turned out to have a heart defect that could cause sudden death, and the other had something bad with the coffin joint. We had a mare where a chronic suspensory was discovered on the PPE--she was moving nicely but the vet detected it during the lameness exam. If I had to guess, I'd say at least 25% of purchases go south on the PPE, but that's a rough guess based on a very small sample, so I'd love to hear what others think.
                                          its cost me one sale out of probably 25 in the last 7 years.....and it was a conclusion drawn by the mother of the rider who was a nurse and decided she could read x rays better than the vet they hired. 🤷🏻*♀️🤦🏻*♀️
                                          Otherwise I have not had one I sold “fail” a vetting or otherwise have the purchase price reduced as a result of the vetting. I would say that’s pretty good.

                                          Comment

                                          Working...
                                          X