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What do your staff wear to work???

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  • What do your staff wear to work???

    So this might be a silly question, but as I'm sick on the couch today I got to spend more time on the internet than normal. Cruising around Yard and Groom, checking out the groom and barn manager jobs available that I sometimes think about applying for. So my question is:

    What do you expect an applicant to show up wearing for an interview?

    What do you expect them to wear every day to work?
    Riding the winds of change

    Heeling NRG Aussies
    Like us on facebook!

  • #2
    I'm a BM at a very low-key barn. My general work attire is breeches and a T-shirt with paddock boots. If it's wet, wellies; if it's cold, my tall Bogs. We don't really have a dress code--no spaghetti strap tops, no exposed toes, no dangly earrings, hair must be off your face, nothing obscenely tight or low-cut. Most people wear breeches and a tee. I will occasionally wear yoga pants or jeans.

    If we go off the farm, it's normally a polo shirt and clean jeans or khakis with paddock boots.

    For an interview I would expect tucked in or fitted polo, clean jeans/khakis with a belt, clean paddock boots, tidy hair. There was one girl who showed up for an interview wearing sweatpants and Uggs--didn't make the best impression!

    I'm sick today too--I hope you feel better!
    I love my Econo-Nag!

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    • #3
      What I expect...

      Khakis, paddock boots, polo shirt - if a non-riding position.

      Breeches, polished tall boots, polo, belt - if riding position.

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      • #4
        None of the three barns I have worked for have had a dresscode for on-the-farm. The first one I usually wore a jacket or shirt with their logo at shows. The second required polos with their logo at shows (and I chose to whenever we had visitors on farm). The most recent is very casual (and I'm the only employee/manager, so...) I generally wear a nice t-shirt with their logo & jeans. I do wear tanks when it's really hot but they're tasteful and basic. I do not wear boots, they are too uncomfortable when a) you're on your feet 8+ hours a day, b) I don't ride anyway, c) they don't protect your feet any better than my running shoes from shod hooves Always a belt, nobody wants to see your crack! Although perhaps others don't suffer from the same problem, but I can't remember the last time I owned a pair of jeans that didn't do that without a belt and I'm a 4! Maybe others are more lucky.

        If I were interviewing someone to assist me, or for my job specifically, I would expect them to show up in a nice collared/polo shirt, clean jeans, khakis, or breeches, and either running shoes or boots...chances are I'd want to see them handle the horses, so standard interview attire is probably out. I think the overall impression is more important than a specific type of attire...

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        • #5
          Interview: Buisiness casual. Khakis, penny loafers, danksos or similar shoes (no sneakers) spit polished paddies if no pennies owned. Nice shirt, tucked in w/ belt, Possibly a jacket/blazer depending on time of year.

          Barn *cleaning* help? Whatever the heck they'd like, provided the shoes are safe. ME--long pants, usually chino type work pants in summer, sweats over layers of stuff in winter... Boggs shoes or Muck Boots. Polo just because I'd rather wear a cheap 2nd hand polo than a t-shirt.

          Staff presenting horses, grooming, etc., Khakis or chinos, polo shirt, paddies.

          I don't expect anyone cleaning stalls to ruin their paddies in manure. Nor do I wear mine for stall cleaning. When I have become part of a staff for presenting horses, or preparing them for television, sales or fesitivals, I realise that I am part of the general impression--people stop to watch me braid or brush, ask questions... I want to look just as professional as the riders.

          NOW, when people sneak up on me at home... they might find: muck shoes, shorts that have no right being in public (as in old, stained, too big, not too short... ) and a big ol' ugly t-shirt. Or a nightgown and boots. But that's MY BACKYARD. And they were NOT invited.

          Feel better.
          InnisFailte Pinto Sporthorses & Coloured Cobs
          ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

          Bits are like cats, what's one more? (Petstorejunkie)

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          • #6
            Do people still buy penny loafers? I haven't seen those since grade school.

            Unless I knew I was going to be asked to ride for the interview, I'd dress like I would for any interview--business casual. (These days, zip-front paddock boots would be fine for a NON-horse interview as they're 'in'.) No jeans, sweats, or t-shirts or messy ponytails, no sneakers, Uggs, Crocs.
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            • #7
              BNT barn here

              Barn staff- jeans, shorts, khakis, tees, tanks, whatever as long as its not obscene or unsafe

              Grooms- pretty much the same

              Trainers- shirts, breeches, tall boots or paddocks and half chaps

              Office staff- pretty much whatever- if they're in and out of the barn a lot they'll usually not wear open toed shoes
              "As soon as you're born you start dyin'
              So you might as well have a good time"

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              • #8
                Also, might want to check and see if its a "working" interview- We do a lot of those and would prefer people to show up in jeans and boots rather than fancy khakis
                "As soon as you're born you start dyin'
                So you might as well have a good time"

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                • #9
                  I work for a BNT as the only staff member/manager, and I wear jeans or shorts, and a t-shirt or tank top, pony tail and a ball cap, and paddock boots.
                  Proud mother to Matt, a 18 year-old TB gelding.

                  FOREVER

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                  • #10
                    Interview- no innappropriate clothing for even being in a barn- no heels, no short skirts, no long scarfs that catch on things, etc. The people that show up in clothing that automatically makes it difficult to even walk through the barn are starting off on the wrong foot, and yet they come dressed like that!

                    Working- closed toed shoes, long pants and whatever kind of shirt you like as long as it is appropriate to wear with children around. Cell phone and cigarettes should stay in your car and only be used on your lunch break! We don't allow headphones and any sort of music players.

                    But seriously the cell phone thing is a big peeve of mine, if I catch a groom standing in the back of a stall text messaging instead of brushing a horse to me that is as useless as someone who drinks on the job. It detracts from the attention you are giving to the thousand pound animal you are working with and the productivity level of you as an employee.

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                    • #11
                      I %^&#ing loathe khakis

                      I have never worked somewhere where there was an stated dress code but I have always felt common sense and respect for the sport/barn lended itself to wearing a clean polo (obviously going to get dirty, but don't wear a ratty one) and breeches.

                      FL experiences:
                      Growing up in Fl during competition season we all wore barn polos and clean jeans with boots.

                      During the non-competition season we started the day in polos/breeches/boots and changed to shorts/polos/sneakers.

                      Other Fl barns; breeches all day, either wellies or sneakers when not riding

                      Barns outside of Fl;
                      Breeches or jeans

                      Interviews: Non riding position-dark wash jeans that fit correctly, clean boots. If riding position, breeches and boots. Regardless-well fitted polo and watch, hat, hair tidy, no jewelry. Spurs, stick in truck in case expected to use them. If cold, well fitted barn jacket or fleece, etc. Pretty common sense, eh?

                      I have never had to wear khakis and if it was requirement I likely would not take the job. I loathe khakis and think they're impossible to keep presentable in a barn position.

                      I know a lot of barns frown on sneakers but I've worked at some *nice* places and we all wore sneakers, wellies, or boots depending on weather and the job at hand. *shrug*
                      True Bearing Equestrian
                      St. Helena Island, SC

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by pintopiaffe View Post
                        Interview: Buisiness casual. Khakis, penny loafers, danksos or similar shoes (no sneakers) spit polished paddies if no pennies owned. Nice shirt, tucked in w/ belt, Possibly a jacket/blazer depending on time of year.
                        Man, I would have never, ever gotten hired at your place! A BLAZER for an interview for a farm position? Penny loafers (where do I get penny loafers these days?!)? I might actually be turned off by someone wearing clothes (shoes, in particular) that weren't appropriate for barn work if they were applying for that type of position.

                        I think it's pretty standard... Most people will expect you to be neat, clean, and presentable. No exposed goodies, clean shoes, etc. I would probably find it best if the person were turned out to do the work I expected of them while representing my farm off-premises. So for a groom, well-fitted jeans, polo shirt (or similar), paddock or similar boots. For a rider, collared shirt with clean, conservative colored breeches, clean tall boots and a belt (assuming the interview included riding).
                        Here today, gone tomorrow...

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                        • #13
                          I'm pretty much agreeing with everyone here. For day to day stuff, jeans, a decent shirt, appropriate footwear. If you're riding, breeches and tall boots or paddocks/half chaps.

                          For an interview, I expect people to wear about what they'd be wearing for day to day work, just nicer. As in, nice jeans and a polo or button down shirt, or breeches and tall boots with a nice polo. I've had people turn up to my barn in business type attire and it kind of was a turn off. My first impression was, "Has this person ever been around a barn before?"
                          exploring the relationship between horse and human

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by CosMonster View Post
                            I've had people turn up to my barn in business type attire and it kind of was a turn off. My first impression was, "Has this person ever been around a barn before?"
                            Ditto, I really don't get the idea. A really sharp polo, dark wash jeans, clean/buffed boots gives a very professional-and industry oriented-look that office attire really lacks in a barn. Office attire just looks awkward in a barn, imo. And since you're there for an interview, you usually handle some horses or should be ready to leap in and help out.

                            Last interview I did I ended up volunteering to poultice a horse's legs when the director was called away from our interview on an emergency and the only other staff member didn't know how to do it. If I'd been wearing office wear, I would NOT have been so keen to volunteer.
                            True Bearing Equestrian
                            St. Helena Island, SC

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by CosMonster View Post
                              I'm pretty much agreeing with everyone here. For day to day stuff, jeans, a decent shirt, appropriate footwear. If you're riding, breeches and tall boots or paddocks/half chaps.

                              For an interview, I expect people to wear about what they'd be wearing for day to day work, just nicer. As in, nice jeans and a polo or button down shirt, or breeches and tall boots with a nice polo. I've had people turn up to my barn in business type attire and it kind of was a turn off. My first impression was, "Has this person ever been around a barn before?"
                              Yup, this
                              "As soon as you're born you start dyin'
                              So you might as well have a good time"

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