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SCAD Equestrian/Photography Majors

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    SCAD Equestrian/Photography Majors

    Hey all!
    I'm thinking about going to SCAD (Savannah College of Art and Design) to major/minor in photography and equestrian studies. Has anyone done something similar or been to that school?
    I know the argument that a equine studies major is typically considered useless but I wanted to hear more opinions about it. Instead of doing just equine studies, which I actually find the classes on course design and judging super interesting, I want to also study photography.
    Thank you!

    #2
    You might want to flip your majors, photography first then business with a specialty in equine studies You will need an understanding of how a business is structured. The equine studies aspect is a very narrow pathway.

    Our kids grew up with horses, we have just out the back door. They showed their horses and competed nationally. But none ended working in the equine industry.

    My son attended Brooks Institute. His was the last class to be taught film and was cross trained in digital. The school was specialized and at the time rated one of the best in the world. He did not graduate only because his summer internship lead to an opportunity that could not be refused. (But at one time he did employ nearly all of his former classmates)

    The photography industry is really built on relationships, who knows who. An insignificant introduction or opportunity could lead to a career. His specialty has been fashion print which lead to fashion commercials (internet and broadcast) He currently is directing videos.

    Oldest daughter has a degree in Chemistry but works as a professional photographer, she specializes in family and new born babies.

    Neither work in equine photographery but that was where they were first exposed to photography.

    Comment


      #3
      What is your actual job goal?

      If you are thinking of being a photographer, horse related and/or otherwise, I would also encourage at least a business minor. You will be likely to end up owning your own business, and that background will be important to your success. While you may want to focus on horses alone, it's also likely that you may need to do other types of shoots at times or at least while building up your business.

      If you also plan to ride and show yourself as an adult, I would consider this path carefully. Photographers, whether shooting horse shows or family portraits or weddings, often end up doing the majority of their work on the weekend when people are available and these events take place.
      Flickr

      Comment


        #4
        might add both of our photographer kids use their ability to handle animals in their profession. Often the person being photographed has to use an animal as prop in the session ...many of the models/subjects have a fear of animals

        Our son has had to show models the camel will not hurt them, the wild cat is tame and that dog really will not chew you up... so you can use your animal training talent in the profession. He really enjoyed working with this cat for a cover
        Click image for larger version  Name:	large_640x_28f3347129f7136d1e2b04156b2925ce02e9bd38_page0001.jpg Views:	4 Size:	11.1 KB ID:	10522887



        but take him to horse show and you get stuff like this Click image for larger version  Name:	10598458_718873088148351_1069469971_n.jpg Views:	1 Size:	20.0 KB ID:	10522888


        Comment


          #5
          You do you.

          With that said, my non-horsey cousin graduated from SCAD as a photography major a few years ago. She had been consistently under-employed since graduation. She does freelance work in her field, but has not been able to earn a living off it. Without other job skills, she’s been stuck in entry level retail and administrative positions where one does not necessarily need an education.

          My cousin’s experience will not necessarily be yours, and I’m not trying to talk you out of anything. I just think it’s something to keep in mind.

          On the flip side, just about every single non-horsey job I got in my first 10 years out of college was either directly or indirectly related to my horse experience. A lot of fellow horse people seeing my resume and having it catch their eye, even if it wasn’t a horse job...
          Don't fall for a girl who fell for a horse just to be number two in her world... ~EFO

          Comment


            #6
            I taught high school art for 17 years, taught art total 28 years. I taught in the Atlanta area and will tell you that I don't think a lot of SCAD. Here's why: they don't require portfolios to get in, they will accept anyone and take their money, they don't have a good graduation rate, they are ranked in the thirties for art schools but are as expensive as the third ranked art school. They would have "workshops" and my students who went to them came back and said that there was no reason for them to take high school art. So, um, no, you can't come to my class and make a case for going to your art school. When they bought the old Atlanta School of art I had some students who transitioned to them and were appalled that they were in college art courses with students who had never drawn anything. Also, have met riders who went there who never took an art course. You see, Title Nine requires that you spend an equivalent amount of money on women's sports as men's, and horseback riding is a sure way to do that.
            Their argument is that they are just so inclusive, but let's face it, if you are going to art school you need to know that it is your thing and you have a knack for it. To many dreamers who think they like it, but unless you are very dedicated and search out opportunities there and stay on course, they will be happy just taking your money.
            SCAD has done wonderful things for Savannah, but is essentially a waste of money. Go to the Art Institute of Chicago art school and you will spend the same amount but be FAR better educated.

            Comment


              #7
              The xeroxchick is correct. In the past, I have met many women who graduated from SCAD's visual art programs and deliberately went there for the horses and I know a few men and women who graduated from some of their digital media-related programs. None of them are what I would call "successful" and most of them are not using anything they picked up at SCAD in the real world or working in professions that are directly related to their educational take-away from SCAD. The same goes for others I've known, who went to other notable Arts schools such as the AIC in Chicago and still came out a talented bum for all of the good it did them.
              Thus do we growl that our big toes have, at this moment, been thrown up from below!

              Comment

                Original Poster

                #8
                Originally posted by xeroxchick View Post
                I taught high school art for 17 years, taught art total 28 years. I taught in the Atlanta area and will tell you that I don't think a lot of SCAD. Here's why: they don't require portfolios to get in, they will accept anyone and take their money, they don't have a good graduation rate, they are ranked in the thirties for art schools but are as expensive as the third ranked art school. They would have "workshops" and my students who went to them came back and said that there was no reason for them to take high school art. So, um, no, you can't come to my class and make a case for going to your art school. When they bought the old Atlanta School of art I had some students who transitioned to them and were appalled that they were in college art courses with students who had never drawn anything. Also, have met riders who went there who never took an art course. You see, Title Nine requires that you spend an equivalent amount of money on women's sports as men's, and horseback riding is a sure way to do that.
                Their argument is that they are just so inclusive, but let's face it, if you are going to art school you need to know that it is your thing and you have a knack for it. To many dreamers who think they like it, but unless you are very dedicated and search out opportunities there and stay on course, they will be happy just taking your money.
                SCAD has done wonderful things for Savannah, but is essentially a waste of money. Go to the Art Institute of Chicago art school and you will spend the same amount but be FAR better educated.
                Thank you for the little insight! I know there are good and bad things about each school so it’s hard to know what’s really worth it.

                Comment

                  Original Poster

                  #9
                  Originally posted by clanter View Post
                  You might want to flip your majors, photography first then business with a specialty in equine studies You will need an understanding of how a business is structured. The equine studies aspect is a very narrow pathway.

                  Our kids grew up with horses, we have just out the back door. They showed their horses and competed nationally. But none ended working in the equine industry.

                  My son attended Brooks Institute. His was the last class to be taught film and was cross trained in digital. The school was specialized and at the time rated one of the best in the world. He did not graduate only because his summer internship lead to an opportunity that could not be refused. (But at one time he did employ nearly all of his former classmates)

                  The photography industry is really built on relationships, who knows who. An insignificant introduction or opportunity could lead to a career. His specialty has been fashion print which lead to fashion commercials (internet and broadcast) He currently is directing videos.

                  Oldest daughter has a degree in Chemistry but works as a professional photographer, she specializes in family and new born babies.

                  Neither work in equine photographery but that was where they were first exposed to photography.
                  My original plan was actually just that - either double major in photography and equine studies or major in photography with a minor in equine studies. There are also a couple of schools that have a Equine Business Management major, does anyone have any experience with that?

                  Comment


                    #10
                    I went to SCAD and would be happy to answer any questions you have!

                    Just gonna comment on some things mentioned here: yes, SCAD doesn't require portfolios, but like any school there are talented kids and non-talented kids and IMO your likelihood of success both in school at outside of it will hinge on that. I would also not consider SCAD Atlanta to be on par with the Savannah campus, just like I wouldn't compare many other UC schools to Berkeley.

                    The reason I enjoyed SCAD and was initially drawn to it was that it felt like a much more "collegiate" experience than Parsons, SVA, RISD, ie other competitive art schools, some of which really feel like sweatshops with no real community. I also really enjoyed how diverse it was.

                    Your ability to get a career in a creative field isn't just based on your talent - it's based on your ability to market yourself, find your niche, where you're located for what skill set and market you fit into, etc. But talent is a huge portion of it. Photography is a tougher market to get into. I know photo majors who struggled like another commenter mentioned - I know some who are wildly successful. Illustration is also a dead-end major, where the jobs:grads ratio isn't there. So I'd take a close look at each department's job placement ratings.

                    The equestrian program is really incredible. I never rode on the team, too busy with my own horses, but did keep a horse there for a while and also donated a horse to the program. They take absolutely impeccable care of the horses, the facility is nicer than half the barns in GP Village, and the staff is awesome. I don't know many other programs with an on-staff vet, school horses at that quality, etc. But equine studies isn't a major I'd pursue, just because it does have really limited job opportunities. You're maybe looking at a career that tops out with being a barn manager or a pro groom and you don't need to go to a private school to learn how to do either of those things.

                    My suggestion would be that if you're really passionate about a creative career, definitely consider the school and consider majoring in something where there's high demand for skilled laborers (visual design, industrial design, user researching, etc.) and be a part of the riding program in whatever way you can be.

                    Anyway, PM me if you have any questions! Happy to help and absolutely would not have traded my education there for anything else.

                    Comment

                      Original Poster

                      #11
                      Originally posted by Biscotti View Post
                      I went to SCAD and would be happy to answer any questions you have!

                      Just gonna comment on some things mentioned here: yes, SCAD doesn't require portfolios, but like any school there are talented kids and non-talented kids and IMO your likelihood of success both in school at outside of it will hinge on that. I would also not consider SCAD Atlanta to be on par with the Savannah campus, just like I wouldn't compare many other UC schools to Berkeley.

                      The reason I enjoyed SCAD and was initially drawn to it was that it felt like a much more "collegiate" experience than Parsons, SVA, RISD, ie other competitive art schools, some of which really feel like sweatshops with no real community. I also really enjoyed how diverse it was.

                      Your ability to get a career in a creative field isn't just based on your talent - it's based on your ability to market yourself, find your niche, where you're located for what skill set and market you fit into, etc. But talent is a huge portion of it. Photography is a tougher market to get into. I know photo majors who struggled like another commenter mentioned - I know some who are wildly successful. Illustration is also a dead-end major, where the jobs:grads ratio isn't there. So I'd take a close look at each department's job placement ratings.

                      The equestrian program is really incredible. I never rode on the team, too busy with my own horses, but did keep a horse there for a while and also donated a horse to the program. They take absolutely impeccable care of the horses, the facility is nicer than half the barns in GP Village, and the staff is awesome. I don't know many other programs with an on-staff vet, school horses at that quality, etc. But equine studies isn't a major I'd pursue, just because it does have really limited job opportunities. You're maybe looking at a career that tops out with being a barn manager or a pro groom and you don't need to go to a private school to learn how to do either of those things.

                      My suggestion would be that if you're really passionate about a creative career, definitely consider the school and consider majoring in something where there's high demand for skilled laborers (visual design, industrial design, user researching, etc.) and be a part of the riding program in whatever way you can be.

                      Anyway, PM me if you have any questions! Happy to help and absolutely would not have traded my education there for anything else.
                      Thank you! I just might PM you with some questions...
                      I’m on the West Coast so I totally understand comparing UC Berkeley to something like UC Riverside! I at the very least want to minor in equestrian studies because some of the classes are extremely interesting but I also know I would want to major in something art/design that’s in high demand to stay on the safe side.

                      Comment


                        #12
                        Originally posted by miss maggie View Post

                        I at the very least want to minor in equestrian studies because some of the classes are extremely interesting but I also know I would want to major in something art/design that’s in high demand to stay on the safe side.
                        sounds like my older daughter, she went to what was then a private woman college was able to ride every semester but her major was chemistry (she was at randolph macon woman's college)

                        As a suggestion... look at either Sweet Briar College or Hollins University ..either will provide you with an excellent education in an environment that will challenge you but teach you to succeed

                        Comment


                          #13
                          Originally posted by miss maggie View Post
                          I’m on the West Coast so I totally understand comparing UC Berkeley to something like UC Riverside!
                          FWIW, depending on one's major (and yes, I know, not your interests ) but if I was majoring in botany, agriculture, etc, I'd pick UCR over UCB any day



                          Oh, I have slipped the surly bonds of earth, And danced the skies on laughter-silvered wings; John Gilliespie Magee, Jr

                          Comment


                            #14
                            Our own COTH Untacked magazine seems to have ads from firms that use high end pictures, horse themed many, of course.

                            If you can find out who those photographers are, talk to them, look at their bios, find out where they learned their craft and how to market themselves, etc.

                            Comment


                              #15
                              Originally posted by Bluey View Post
                              Our own COTH Untacked magazine seems to have ads from firms that use high end pictures, horse themed many, of course.

                              If you can find out who those photographers are, talk to them, look at their bios, find out where they learned their craft and how to market themselves, etc.
                              advertising photography is more about creativity that the actual point and shoot.... its how do you position the product to encourage its market presence ...and often what works does not make any sense to the average person
                              Last edited by clanter; Nov. 25, 2019, 10:30 AM.

                              Comment


                                #16
                                Originally posted by miss maggie View Post

                                I at the very least want to minor in equestrian studies because some of the classes are extremely interesting but I also know I would want to major in something art/design that’s in high demand to stay on the safe side.
                                You do realize that you can usually take the "interesting, but not really important to my actual major" courses as electives, right? Most college degree programs allow space for a little flexibility that way.

                                Comment


                                  #17
                                  That is a lot of money to spend. Really, get a solid degree in something, go out and make money and you can ride all you want. Even I got a degree in Art History instaed of fine art after starting in studio art.
                                  I have a good friend who was a very successful photographer, did lots of ads and catalogs and made a lot of money. He had a degree in theater and went right to work in NYC theaters doing colstumes. His degree taught him all about lighting and that was how he slid into being an assistant to Bill King, the Vogue photographer, then went on to a career. You never know, but I would say that four years of expensive fun better parlay into some way to make a living.

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