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Spin Off on Note About Confidence (thought this would be fun): What are YOUR greatest strengths as an equestrian?

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  • #41
    I think of this, too. I am good with babies and the basics they need when they start out. I have bred and staarted several of my own homebreds. They have confidence in me. I am quiet, tolerant and have a quiet seat and hot horses will just calm down ... (I am told).

    Also, I can pick out a good horse when shopping for one. It does not matter to me if I don't win a ribbon because it is not all about that. My daughter, too, can get on any horse and it goes sweetly for her.

    And, I often say, horses do not lie, so I try and find the cause when they don't understand.
    Proud member of People Who Hate to Kill Wildlife clique

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    • Original Poster

      #42
      These are all fantastic!

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      • #43
        I'm not the most patient person with humans, but in the saddle I NEVER lose my temper. Like never. I'm very proud of that.

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        • #44
          Hah, for me, patience was a long hard fought battle that I have won on most days (and spent a good chunk of my youth not on the winning side). I have learned that I need to go do something else if the day turns out to not be one of those days though, so that is a big win in my mind.

          I used to say my butt knew what direction the horse was headed (up, down, sideways, bolt, spin, buck, rear) before the horse even knew where it was headed. This led to a lot of stickability moments for most of my life, but unlike the "with age comes patience" apparently the stickability starts to decline. #sadblueface However it IS replaced by the wisdom to not get yourself in those kind of moments where your (now MIA) stickability might be necessary.

          But I do put some great ground manners on a horse, and I have spent a good chunk of my life NOT spending all my time in one discipline. I think that curiosity about other disciplines, different seats, saddles (or carriages!) would make anyone a better horse person, so I like to think it has worked its magic on me too.
          Your crazy is showing. You might want to tuck that back in.

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          • #45
            Originally posted by DMK View Post
            Hah, for me, patience was a long hard fought battle that I have won on most days (and spent a good chunk of my youth not on the winning side). I have learned that I need to go do something else if the day turns out to not be one of those days though, so that is a big win in my mind.

            I used to say my butt knew what direction the horse was headed (up, down, sideways, bolt, spin, buck, rear) before the horse even knew where it was headed. This led to a lot of stickability moments for most of my life, but unlike the "with age comes patience" apparently the stickability starts to decline. #sadblueface However it IS replaced by the wisdom to not get yourself in those kind of moments where your (now MIA) stickability might be necessary.

            But I do put some great ground manners on a horse, and I have spent a good chunk of my life NOT spending all my time in one discipline. I think that curiosity about other disciplines, different seats, saddles (or carriages!) would make anyone a better horse person, so I like to think it has worked its magic on me too.
            Have you tried reining?
            There you have to learn to ask a horse and then chill out, let the horse stand there before moving on.
            It is always interesting to watch someone from other disciplines, that keep a horse on the go all the time, that so very important forward motion, no question that, but then forget the stand there and lets wait a bit.
            That is what keeps reining horses from becoming a hot bundle of nerves if you don't have installed that chill, be patient, relax button right from the start, on horse and human.

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            • #46
              I'm really good at having a get it done attitude. Once I've decided we are doing something, we do it no matter what. No room for BS. I'm good at being able to step back when I have a problem and looking at it from a horse's perspective to see if he can understand what I'm asking. I'm good at giving my horse a good warmup. I'm good at mixing it up so my poor horse isn't super bored. I'm good at listening to my trainer even when I'm afraid to do what she's asking.
              http://www.facebook.com/pages/Fentre...24774504235082

              http://fentressfieldsequestriancenter.com/

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              • #47
                Bluey, I rode some reiners for a trainer I worked for way, way back in the day. But it was a long way from actually riding a reiner!

                But you want hot as a firecracker, handier than a reiner... and now... relax? Then, come run hazards with me!
                Your crazy is showing. You might want to tuck that back in.

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                • #48
                  Although I sometimes question my riding ability when it comes to putting some finer buttons on a horse, I know that I am good at least at SOME things :

                  * Good at reading horse body language, good at groundwork and getting a youngster to trust me and be ready to be backed with calmness and confidence;
                  * Good at backing said youngsters and putting their first miles under a saddle at w/t/c;
                  * Sticky seat! and able to calm down nervous horses. It all comes down to the fact, that I'm pretty good and confident when it comes to starting flighty youngsters and teaching them how to think. The really good riders can then take over and teach the horse all the nooks and crannies, but what they'll get from me will be a safe, sensible animal who enjoys being with people.

                  Also, I never, ever stop learning and tend to question everything I, at some point, have believed to be a fact.

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                  • #49
                    Lord this is actually difficult to answer.

                    I have said forever that I feel like my horse life is an example of mediocrity. I'm never the best at any one discipline, but I am not the worst either.

                    When I galloped racehorses I was good, but not great. I could jog ANYTHING which included a lot of hyped up colts who preferred to show off their airs above the ground. And I stayed on. When it came to galloping I got better when I got into a job that had me galloping more than jogging but I am not one of the best out there. Just mediocre.

                    In eventing, I made it to Intermediate in the long format days, but I never did a 2* (Now 3*) and I have been told by some of the current eventers that those of us who did the 'upper levels' then are now only considered to be on par with the 1* riders today. Because the sport is more difficult now.

                    I suck at hunters, I rock at fox hunting and I want to learn Polo.

                    But jumpers.... only now do I feel like there is a chance to exceed my "mediocre" thoughts. I bought my guy (off of Facebook, from England, having never sat on him) and we've moved up to the edge of the big levels. 2020 has a lot of fun ideas in the provisional calendars....but we're not there yet.

                    So I think at this point I am still mediocre. BUT I can give great pep talks on the internet and my horse world stories are beyond epic and I can spot a great horse from a mile away, even when he looks.....you guessed it...Mediocre.


                    Emily
                    "Courage is not the absence of fear but rather the judgment that something is more important than fear. The brave may not live forever but the cautious do not live at all." ~2001 The Princess Diaries

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                    • #50
                      I floated this question past my daughter she thought for a long time. Her eventual response was ... 'I'm really good at flinging myself at the earth.'

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                      • #51
                        Originally posted by Bluey View Post

                        Have you tried reining?
                        There you have to learn to ask a horse and then chill out, let the horse stand there before moving on.
                        It is always interesting to watch someone from other disciplines, that keep a horse on the go all the time, that so very important forward motion, no question that, but then forget the stand there and lets wait a bit.
                        That is what keeps reining horses from becoming a hot bundle of nerves if you don't have installed that chill, be patient, relax button right from the start, on horse and human.
                        I love this, Bluey. It's brilliant!

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                        • #52
                          I seem to have an ability to inspire horses so that they surpass what they think they can do. I guess it's because I love them so much.

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                          • #53
                            I have pretty quiet hands. I have had multiple people tell me this as well so I feel like this is one of my strong suits I can also relate to those with a velcro butt because I'm the same way when I first started riding I was quite the little daredevil!

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                            • #54
                              Persistence, mostly.

                              (And one of my barn-mates recently told me that of all the horse owners she knows, I am the most tuned in to what's going on with my horse. I will admit I'm pretty proud of that, but the horse makes it easy by being very clear about her opinions.)
                              You have to have experiences to gain experience.

                              1998 Morgan mare Mythic Feronia "More Valley Girl Than Girl Scout!"

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                              • Original Poster

                                #55
                                Originally posted by M'al View Post
                                I floated this question past my daughter she thought for a long time. Her eventual response was ... 'I'm really good at flinging myself at the earth.'
                                I relate so much to this.

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                                • #56
                                  Grooming. I love grooming. I only trail ride but my horse shines and the tack is spotless. I wash the tail weekly, use elbow grease on the body and keep the mane in braids (take them out on the weekend). It's not the most important skill but its my best.
                                  In memory of Apache, who loved to play. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MjZAqeg7HyE

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