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Toed Out Horse for Eventing

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  • Toed Out Horse for Eventing

    Hello! Still on the hunt for my next low level eventing mount. I found a darling 2yr old unraced TB filly - built beautifully, has an amazing brain, and the absolute sweetest personality. The only issue with her is that one of her front legs is crooked with her toe out. It seems like the rotation comes from her shoulder. How likely is it that she’ll remain sound through training for low level eventing? She moved completely sound on it, she was a little gimpy because she just got shoes pulled and her hooves need to be done.


  • #2
    First, I would not buy a horse that "is a little gimpy", no matter what reason.
    At least have a vet check that out in a PPE.

    Pictures are not always true to what is there, but it seems that her pasterns are way long, which would be a concern on a horse that is going to be expected to be jumping seriously.
    Too long pasterns if that is true to other proportions, not just an optical illusion in those pictures, may predispose a horse to supporting apparatus, suspensory trouble, not ideal for a jumper.

    That she is that young and has a great disposition and you like her so well also counts along with what her current conformation may indicate, something that could possibly change.
    As she matures and gains some width in the next several years, the front may straighten a bit more.

    If she is "a little gimpy" the seller should take her off the market and wait to show her until she is sound, I would think.

    You may get more answers in the eventing forum, by eventers that are right now competing and know what the lower levels you want to participate in require, that may not be that much, where such deviation would matter?

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    • Original Poster

      #3
      Originally posted by Bluey View Post
      First, I would not buy a horse that "is a little gimpy", no matter what reason.
      At least have a vet check that out in a PPE.

      Pictures are not always true to what is there, but it seems that her pasterns are way long, which would be a concern on a horse that is going to be expected to be jumping seriously.
      Too long pasterns if that is true to other proportions, not just an optical illusion in those pictures, may predispose a horse to supporting apparatus, suspensory trouble, not ideal for a jumper.

      That she is that young and has a great disposition and you like her so well also counts along with what her current conformation may indicate, something that could possibly change.
      As she matures and gains some width in the next several years, the front may straighten a bit more.

      If she is "a little gimpy" the seller should take her off the market and wait to show her until she is sound, I would think.

      You may get more answers in the eventing forum, by eventers that are right now competing and know what the lower levels you want to participate in require, that may not be that much, where such deviation would matter?
      Thank you for your answer! I’ll move it to the eventing forum later today if there aren’t very many answers.

      I have no intentions of purchasing her until after a PPE is done and she comes up completely sound. The owner had *just* taken her shoes off. Prior to them being taken off, she looked entirely sound to my trainer and myself. A vet cleared her and her leg for low level eventing, I’m simply looking for other opinions, hopefully from those who have dealt with similar issues.

      Comment


      • #4
        I bought a 6 year old gelding in the spring who toes out on his right foot. He did race for 3 seasons and retire sound on it though so a bit more proven than a 2 year old. I did a very thorough PPE when purchasing him and vet was not overly concerned. My goal is low level eventing.

        Since owning him, my farrier has been able to balance foot better so it is not as obvious. Not letting his feet get long is part of the key to success. When I went to see him, I didn’t really notice the toed out foot. When I went back 2 weeks later to vet, it was immediately obvious due to his feet being long.

        My gelding was also very thin and undermuscled when I got him. Putting some muscle on his chest has really changed the way he stands in front and toeing out has decreased because his also comes from quite high on his leg. It’s never going to be textbook perfect but has significantly improved. I will say though - his Pasterns are not nearly as long as that filly. I would personally wait until her feet were ok to PPE if you’re interested.

        Comment


        • #5
          Toed out would not concern me...my own eventer was toed out and cow-hocked, and could go over most Training Level fences and some Prelim, and was able to jump well into his 20s. I would concern myself about interfering between legs on a toed out horse, but what would concern me more is a young 2 year old who is gimpy without shoes along with the other problems other people mentioned. Any horse that needs shoes before actually learning to work is way outside of my personal comfort zone and I would neither buy nor PPE. I would pass entirely.

          Comment


          • #6
            It's not really that unusual that a TB that has just had its shoes pulled would be mildly sore, especially if the ground is hard (it's like concrete here!)

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by Highflyer View Post
              It's not really that unusual that a TB that has just had its shoes pulled would be mildly sore, especially if the ground is hard (it's like concrete here!)
              It is not normal to have a horse for sale and pull the shoes off and then the horse being gimpy is assumed from taking shoes off, why not leave her shod?
              If you have a horse for sale, you keep it comfortable and if that was with shoes, well, you don't take them off right then?

              Unless a horse is in really hard work, they generally don't get shoes just to start under saddle and start training.
              I wonder what this filly has been doing up to now if she was not raced, to have had shoes on?

              Hard to see what is there to really say much.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by Bluey View Post

                It is not normal to have a horse for sale and pull the shoes off and then the horse being gimpy is assumed from taking shoes off, why not leave her shod?
                If you have a horse for sale, you keep it comfortable and if that was with shoes, well, you don't take them off right then?

                Unless a horse is in really hard work, they generally don't get shoes just to start under saddle and start training.
                I wonder what this filly has been doing up to now if she was not raced, to have had shoes on?

                Hard to see what is there to really say much.
                Unraced usually means they went to the track and started training but didn't get entered in a race. So they get shoes as a matter of course at the track. Also I think the track trainers usually get the racing shoes pulled before they rehome them and indeed the racing shoes may wear out fast?

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by Scribbler View Post

                  Unraced usually means they went to the track and started training but didn't get entered in a race. So they get shoes as a matter of course at the track. Also I think the track trainers usually get the racing shoes pulled before they rehome them and indeed the racing shoes may wear out fast?
                  True all that, but we don't have that story yet.
                  Unraced may not even been to the track.
                  If a horse was coming off training and to be sold, you didn't take the shoes off, but maybe others do.

                  That is why it is best to have a vet confirm that the horse is ok, which the OP said she would, I think.

                  Comment

                  • Original Poster

                    #10
                    She breezed multiple times, but never entered a race because she was a slowpoke. She had racing shoes on that were pulled by the owner who has done it with several other tbs and ottbs. In my own experience, tbs/ottbs will almost inevitably be sore and ouchy immediately after shoes are taken off. But, alas, that is my own experience.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by CasuallyPut View Post
                      She breezed multiple times, but never entered a race because she was a slowpoke. She had racing shoes on that were pulled by the owner who has done it with several other tbs and ottbs. In my own experience, tbs/ottbs will almost inevitably be sore and ouchy immediately after shoes are taken off. But, alas, that is my own experience.
                      Most horses you take shoes off and do a barefoot trim do get a little bit off.
                      Any seller would want the horse they present to a buyer to be without questions sound, not ouchy?

                      If you are comfortable with why she is a bit off and your vet agrees is nothing, then that she is ouchy is not going to weigh in your decision if to buy her or not.

                      Thanks for explaining more about where she came from.
                      That she was in serious training and being nice to handle gives her more positive points for you to consider.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        My mare toes out in both front feet. Left > right. She was narrow chested when I got her (long yearling). As she matured and widened through the chest, she did straighten some. It has never bothered her (Dressage training) and she is now 17. Frequent trims for the first year I had her helped too. She had a mildly sheared heal on the left and it took a bit of time to deal with that. We didn’t try to straighten anything. Just aimed for a balanced trim but as she finished growing she did straighten some on her own.

                        Susan

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