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Pasture board re BO's responsibilities

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  • #21
    Originally posted by Janet View Post

    I suspect I am not the only North American unfamiliar with the terms "arvo feeds" and "agistment".

    Could you please explain.

    When I Google it, I get "a tithe for grazing cattle" for "agistment", and nothing remotely relevant fort "arvo feeds"
    I believe Agistment = boarding barn.
    That term has been used in threads here before.

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    • #22
      Originally posted by Scribbler View Post

      Is this in regard to an actual problem?

      in general I would say the person taking money to board a horse has a duty to see that the horse is generally healthy. That said this will depend on the competency of the barn manager to notice things, the size of the property, and the amount of spare time they have on their hands.

      As in any boarding agreement they have a duty to abide by the contract. I'd agree that a daily nose count and see if if any horse is bleeding or three-legged lame could be seen as a "general duty." But if the board is truly remote from the main area, and this is part of the contract, then even regular sighting might not be required without a specific agreement to do so.

      If the horses are sustaining on grass with no supplementary feed on a big field I would not count on any BM going out to check daily.

      The check need be no more than sighting the horse through binoculars. That's why I have no real trouble with a general duty to "count noses."

      The second part of the question is what is the BM supposed to do? Notify owner? Call vet on owners dime? That also needs to be in the contract.

      This is the tough one. First, what does the contract say? Second, if the contract is silent, what are the local rules on "bailments?" (That's a fancy word for taking care, custody, and control over the property of another. ) Just how much responsibility one has for the property of another in their possession can vary widely.

      Without a contract the BO is riding for a fall in many ways as they might find a judge imposing duties that were NEVER contemplated in the arrangement.


      I put my horse on pasture vacation where there's a view from the back deck by nonhorsey people and I check her once a week usually. I don't do much to doctor bite marks on the field.

      IME colic is rarely an issue with horses on pasture.
      If that's the agreement then everything's jake. But there really should be a clear agreement.

      G.
      Mangalarga Marchador: Uma Raça, Uma Paixăo

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      • #23
        Originally posted by Cat Tap View Post
        Does a BO have any responsibilities for horses living outside ? Should they check for minor injuries, notice signs of colic or sudden lameness? Obviously they are responsible for water and forage but what happens if the horses' owners do not come to check on a regular basis?.
        It is entirely dependent on what was agreed to in the contract. If none exists, then I suppose you land in she said/she said.

        If these are truly 'pasture horses' either on grass or on a round bale and a reliable water source, the answer is often that the BO is only responsible for putting out hay and ensuring the water is ok. Oh, and how much am I paying? for peanuts I'm guessing I get shells in return, not a daily once over and shoe check.

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        • #24
          Originally posted by Janet View Post

          I suspect I am not the only North American unfamiliar with the terms "arvo feeds" and "agistment".

          Could you please explain.

          When I Google it, I get "a tithe for grazing cattle" for "agistment", and nothing remotely relevant fort "arvo feeds"
          Arvo feeds = afternoon feeds.

          Agistment = barn/boarding facility

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          • #25
            Originally posted by TMares View Post
            If these are truly 'pasture horses' either on grass or on a round bale and a reliable water source, the answer is often that the BO is only responsible for putting out hay and ensuring the water is ok. Oh, and how much am I paying? for peanuts I'm guessing I get shells in return, not a daily once over and shoe check.
            It goes back to the old adage that you get what you pay for and perhaps the even older adage that boarding is a break even business. Best not to expect any extras unless you are paying for it.

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            • #26
              Pasture board IME has been a fence in good repair, water source or sources and group feed like a round bale. Might include a run in. Fence, water and whatever group feed is out there should be checked daily as should the horses but just a look see, no catching and examining.. But that’s it, just nose count and nothing catastrophic.

              Anything else falls into various random definitions of self care, part care or full care and the price increases because it takes a person or several persons to perform them and it takes time.

              Again, IME, many of the pasture board places don’t have any paid staff and the owner does the checks before they leave for work in the AM. They may move a sick or injured horse IF they have a place to put it but they can’t miss their regular work to sit with it until you can get there.

              Theres a whole lot of things BO should or could do but they may not be able to or have time to. That’s the real world and why bare bones pasture board is priced so low compared to other choices. Often better to pay a bit more for more services-like somebody on the property and a system for isolating the ill or injured...might save in vet bills.

              Make sure to read and understand what's and is not provided before signing any boarding contract. If it’s not in there, it doesn’t exist.
              When opportunity knocks it's wearing overalls and looks like work.

              The horse world. Two people. Three opinions.

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              • #27
                This is varies from barn to barn. My horse is on pasture board and she gets grain twice a day. A look over at those times, fly spray, blanket changes as needed and hay in the winter. The pasture horses, get the same care as the stall boarders just not the stall.

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                • #28
                  Varies greatly. I pay for pasture board and extra hay since my pony is on a dry lot. He gets feed 2x a day, fly sprayed, eyes on him 2x a day, text if they notice anything weird. I love it there. The barn manager goes over and beyond.

                  Its much better care then when I had him on stall board just to have eyes on him.
                  "Anyone who tries to make brownies without butter should be arrested." Ina Garten

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                  • #29
                    boarding contract aside, if I had a horse boarded I would expect reasonable care. They have a responsibility to provide adequate care to these horses, including a safe stable environment, feeding practice, and riding facility, and even having proper safety guidelines and emergency procedures

                    After all they are providing Care, Custody or Control

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                    • #30
                      I think it varies greatly, and depends on your contract with the boarding establishment. I pasture boarded my horses before I brought them home in June. The agreement was self care. She made it clear, that unless she saw a horse down, or 3-legged lame, it was our responsibility to spot this at our feedings. I fed AM and PM and did all turn out, stall cleaning, once over to ensure no injuries or illness, etc.

                      Sadly, she never would fix fences or anything so usually the boarders would band together to fix any fencing issues. It was just the way it was. However, we only paid $150/flat fee a month, and there were paddocks situated over 30 acres of NICE grass so we just simply took it as our responsibility because of the benefit the facility gave to us (lower feed bills for sure!).

                      Anyways, it depends on what is agreed on in the boarding agreement. I brought my horses home to escape barn drama between several of the boarders, and I enjoy having them in my backyard so I can work with them more and not have to try to plan out two trips to the barn inbetween working full time and shuttling all the kids back and forth to school and their extracurricular activities. I do miss the nice grass though!!

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                      • #31
                        A long time ago there was a thread on this board about bailment. A bailment is created when you give someone physical possession of something for a fee but they don't take ownership. It will be returned to you at a later date in the same condition. There needs to be a contract involved . If it's a horse the barn has an obligation to provide reasonable care such as feed, shelter, safe turnout, emergency vet care, etc. If it is not in the same condition it could be negligence on the part of the barn. You probably have to look at state law to see what is covered. In any case, I think we have a reasonable expectation that when we pay someone a monthly fee to board our horses they will provide care and a safe environment that maintains the horse's condition. If fences were neglected and my horse was injured, I would consider the barn owner to be negligent. No matter how much or how little you pay monthly for board, the boarders shouldn't have to band together to fix things like fences or pound ice in water tanks so the horse can drink unless it is part of the contract.

                        Back in 2010 my BO called me at work that the vet was there and she wanted to have my pasture-boarded gelding tested for Lyme disease. She had seen some subtle signs of lameness moving from leg to leg. That made her suspicious but he looked fine to me. She wanted to take advantage of fact that they could draw blood and have it tested without calling the vet to come out again. She was right. He was moderately positive. He was on 6 weeks of doxy and made a full recovery. If she was wrong I might have been pissed off, but I would l much rather have her act on her judgement than worry about my horse being neglected.
                        Tussman's law: Nothing is as inevitable as a mistake whose time has come.

                        "Providence sometimes takes care of idiots." Agnes Morley Cleaveland, No Life for a Lady, 1977.

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                        • #32
                          Originally posted by Denali6298 View Post
                          This is varies from barn to barn. My horse is on pasture board and she gets grain twice a day. A look over at those times, fly spray, blanket changes as needed and hay in the winter. The pasture horses, get the same care as the stall boarders just not the stall.
                          this is the same for us too. And if we needed a stall for an injury we could use one.

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                          • #33
                            Caveat: I'm not a running a boarding facility. We have one pasture boarded horse who lives with our outside group of horses. And he's treated like one of ours.

                            They get fed grain twice a day, and the rude eaters are locked into 'stalls' in the run-in shed so they can't eat more than their fair share. During that period, everyone is checked for missing shoes, any lameness, injury or swollen legs. Blankets are taken off/put on/swapped, if required.

                            If an outside horse gets hurt or requires stall rest, they get to be an 'inside' horse as required. For the boarder, I would charge extra for shavings if he was in for more than a week. His mom travels a lot for work, so we'll call the vet for her if we think he's colicky, injured, or NQR.

                            The pasture boarder gets the same access to the grooming stall, tack room, barn washer/dryer that a stall boarded horse would. She and her horse get the same oversight and amenities as any other horse, just not the stall.
                            A good man can make you feel sexy, strong, and able to take on the world.... oh, sorry.... that's wine...wine does that...

                            http://elementfarm.blogspot.com/

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