Sport Horse Spotlight

Zucchero Gold - Wandres, Frederic - 838-BC18_REU2723-foto_reumann

Real Estate Spotlight

JR-1

Sale Spotlight

  • Welcome to the Chronicle Forums.
    Please complete your profile. The forums and the rest of www.chronofhorse.com has single sign-in, so your log in information for one will automatically work for the other. Disclaimer: The opinions expressed here are the views of the individual and do not necessarily reflect the views and opinions of The Chronicle of the Horse.

Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

WWYD if this was your child?

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #61
    The Grey is an autopilot saint/ Riding him is like sitting in a train car at the zoo, toot toot, he just goes where the rail goes. All she has to do is balance and stay in the middle of him. And she loves it.

    The Red horse is a good guy too. But to ride him, she has to:
    balance
    Pick a line and ride it
    steer
    adjust his speed
    tell him where to go
    adapt to his energy levels
    be in charge
    think ahead
    adjust adjust adjust

    And last week you had to "Make her ride him"

    How, really, is that supposed to work for her in the end?

    Comment


    • #62
      Originally posted by cloudyandcallie View Post
      Send pony home. Life is too short to fear riding. Hopefully your child will learn it is not the fault of equine when we hit the ground. I always blamed myself not the horses who shied and dumped me.
      ^^^ This is my thoughts. Some kids (people) have no fear and can get back on without thinking about it. Others it is just to much for them to over come. At 6 yrs old she is not able to problem solve her feels.
      Last edited by Eleanor; Oct. 4, 2019, 02:23 PM.
      My life motto now is "You can't fix stupid!"

      Are you going to cowboy up, or lie there and bleed

      Comment


      • #63
        Originally posted by clanter View Post

        no I have not watched Those videos.

        I am just saying some kids are very confident on a horse,even at at age six
        Well, I’m addressing the OP’s question about her daughter, it’s not about kids in general.
        ~ Enjoying some guac and boxed wine at the Blue Saddle inn. ~

        Originally posted by LauraKY
        I'm sorry, but this has "eau de hoarder" smell all over it.
        HORSING mobile training app

        Comment


        • #64
          This particular 6 year old is also very tiny. Her feet don’t even go below the bottom of the flap. There’s not much she can do strength wise with those tiny arms to stop and steer either. She needs to be on a smaller, ancient Pony who knows what do do and does not need to be “ ridden”. Plus that, the cool, windy days of winter are close, even the near dead get a bit livelier. This one is simply too much in size and ambition, unsuitable for her at this time and since you can send him back? You need to.

          Spent 17 years in a barn with many Ponies. Seen this a number of times with very young children. It will not scar them for life or teach them Ponies are disposable and the Pony has a place to go so it should be much easier then having bought it.

          Get her a pretty pinto or palomino Small or small medium with a solid resume of working with tiny 5 and 6 year olds, she won’t suffer any ill effects.

          Sometimes you get too close to a situation when it’s your kid and your own dreams are wrapped up with it. All in good time, just not now with that Pony.

          When opportunity knocks it's wearing overalls and looks like work.

          The horse world. Two people. Three opinions.

          Comment


          • #65
            Originally posted by TMares View Post
            The Grey is an autopilot saint/ Riding him is like sitting in a train car at the zoo, toot toot, he just goes where the rail goes. All she has to do is balance and stay in the middle of him. And she loves it.

            The Red horse is a good guy too. But to ride him, she has to:
            balance
            Pick a line and ride it
            steer
            adjust his speed
            tell him where to go
            adapt to his energy levels
            be in charge
            think ahead
            adjust adjust adjust

            And last week you had to "Make her ride him"

            How, really, is that supposed to work for her in the end?
            I agree that Astro looks like a great guy, just not for your daughter right now, at this time. I'm guessing you know what a nice guy he is, and I'd love to ride him, myself! (I'm height challenged). I'm guessing you focused so much on planning for the longterm that it made you forget a little how more time with horses like the grey are needed before being able to ride the chestnut.
            If thou hast a sorrow, tell it not to the arrow, tell it to thy saddlebow, and ride on, singing. -- King Alfred the Great

            Comment


            • #66
              I have a daughter who rides. I get it. I find that the kids don't rationalize the way we do. They don't understand that "working through it" is valuable. They're ruled by their fears. Also, this is an age where she could potentially just quit riding to avoid the scariness. I personally would not risk that. Bye bye, pony.

              FWIW, I sold a fancy pony I bought for DD under similar circumstances. Sold her for half what I bought her for because she had some soundness issues pop up. Then I leased DD a proven, known, less fancy but easier pony. I haven't regretted it one.single.day. Best decision I could've made. Everybody is soooo much happier now. I do wish she'd ride more, but that's irrelevant to this conversation .

              Comment


              • #67
                Originally posted by clanter View Post

                no I have not watched Those videos.

                I am just saying some kids are very confident on a horse,even at at age six
                Yes, absolutely this is true for some six year olds. And I bet their parents are super careful to protect that confidence by ensuring they are on horses or ponies they enjoy riding.

                Comment


                • #68
                  Originally posted by clanter View Post

                  no I have not watched Those videos.

                  I am just saying some kids are very confident on a horse,even at at age six
                  Right, some kids that age think getting dumped is part of riding and fun, but I would guess, most don't, unless they are definitely horse crazy.

                  At 7 I was exercising the neighbor's young mule, never had a saddle or bridle, bareback and with her woven halter.
                  We rode all over the mountains and the biggest thrill was jumping logs.
                  Mule would at landing drop the right shoulder and I would fall off - every - time.
                  Until the end of the summer, when I finally learned to stick the drop.
                  Kind of missed then that part of the fun and games.

                  On the other hand, decades ago, they had here three city kids stay over one summer, 6-7-8 years old.
                  Kids wanted to ride, borrowed three very super gentle ponies ranch kids used to go to school with every day during the year.
                  Got all kids mounted, they were walking around in a pen nicely.
                  One started trotting, kid started yelling and bailed off, the other kids got scared and also started to scream and get off, ponies trotted faster, one bucked it's kid off.
                  Nobody was hurt, but all three up on the fence, no one wanted back on the ponies.
                  Later, older, they would ride some times, but were never that interested in horses.
                  If one of those had been really obsessed with horses at that age, they would have wanted to get on again and try again.
                  Every kid is different.

                  I don't think OP's kid is right now that obsessed with riding to think horses acting up is fun, but evidently still wants to ride.
                  I would work with that, not on trying to ride this one pony, right now.

                  Comment


                  • #69
                    Originally posted by TMares View Post

                    Yes, absolutely this is true for some six year olds. And I bet their parents are super careful to protect that confidence by ensuring they are on horses or ponies they enjoy riding.
                    I do not remember any of our of four kids being dumped by their horses, but their horses were well trained which made them sought after by many for their kids or grand-kids.

                    We spent the time to ensure the kids had mounts that were suitable to the task and understood their responsibility. We were not animal communicators but we made packs with the horses that if they took care of the kids we would take care of them Their task was to be careful with their charges. The horses understood and accepted their role.

                    But we never ever made riding a requirement, and all of their horses we kept to the end to ensure their well being.

                    Comment


                    • #70
                      Originally posted by clanter View Post

                      I do not remember any of our of four kids being dumped by their horses, but their horses were well trained which made them sought after by many for their kids or grand-kids.

                      We spent the time to ensure the kids had mounts that were suitable to the task and understood their responsibility. We were not animal communicators but we made packs with the horses that if they took care of the kids we would take care of them Their task was to be careful with their charges. The horses understood and accepted their role.

                      But we never ever made riding a requirement, and all of their horses we kept to the end to ensure their well being.
                      Eye freaking roll. I, too, have some very well trained and 2 very sought after pony: horses. Even our SAINT pony who is famous has dumped a kid. I guess your kids and your horses are extra special. Good for them they never fell off.
                      Come to the dark side, we have cookies

                      Comment


                      • #71
                        Originally posted by Pennywell Bay View Post

                        Eye freaking roll. I, too, have some very well trained and 2 very sought after pony: horses. Even our SAINT pony who is famous has dumped a kid. I guess your kids and your horses are extra special. Good for them they never fell off.
                        They probably fell. Clanter just doesnt remember it. Our brains dont hold onto memories when nothing happened. If they had gotten hurt, he would have remembered it.
                        Last edited by S1969; Oct. 5, 2019, 08:03 AM.

                        Comment


                        • #72
                          Originally posted by Pennywell Bay View Post

                          Eye freaking roll. I, too, have some very well trained and 2 very sought after pony: horses. Even our SAINT pony who is famous has dumped a kid. I guess your kids and your horses are extra special. Good for them they never fell off.
                          Is it necessary to be this harsh? He's remembering really happy memories of good times with his kids who are grown and gone. Maybe he is forgetting the one time or two one took a tumble, or maybe they did and didn't tell. Who knows.

                          I don't think it's necessary to rip him a new one for having a different POV and I don't see him being ugly, maybe it's just me.

                          Comment


                          • #73
                            I think it’s a little much to expect a horse or pony that’s newish to a barn to deal with the amount of jet noise the OP is taking about. My horse was never bothered but I have zero clue what she would do with the proximity the OP is to a field. Hell we all jumped today at work when two jets flew really close to the building. It’s not normal even though I work on the flight line they were buzzing.

                            Comment


                            • #74
                              Originally posted by TMares View Post

                              Is it necessary to be this harsh? He's remembering really happy memories of good times with his kids who are grown and gone. Maybe he is forgetting the one time or two one took a tumble, or maybe they did and didn't tell. Who knows.

                              I don't think it's necessary to rip him a new one for having a different POV and I don't see him being ugly, maybe it's just me.
                              I didn’t rip anything. The poster made a point on how desired and well trained their horses were, therefore their children didn’t fall. Well trained horses lose their riders. I have no idea what the intent was- but it came off pompous, apparently as mine came off as harsh.
                              Come to the dark side, we have cookies

                              Comment


                              • #75
                                Originally posted by Pennywell Bay View Post

                                I didn’t rip anything. The poster made a point on how desired and well trained their horses were, therefore their children didn’t fall. Well trained horses lose their riders. I have no idea what the intent was- but it came off pompous, apparently as mine came off as harsh.
                                Eye freaking roll. If your's was a neutral comment, I'm the Mona Lisa.

                                Comment


                                • #76
                                  Late to the party here, but I I'd like to circle back to the main point here which is that you should definitely send the pony back or re-sell it without hesitation. The ideal pony for a six year old is a more solid type than what you are describing. Do not sacrifice your daughter's confidence and love of riding over a pony that isn't a good fit.

                                  Your daughter is definitely NOT going to think that ponies are disposable. On the contrary, learning to let go of or move on from horses/ponies that are unsuitable is a very important lesson. It actually is a lesson that has a lot of implications in other areas of life besides horses. There is a lot of wisdom in knowing how to choose relationships, horses, jobs, etc. that bring positive things into your life. And a lot of wisdom in knowing when to step away from something that isn't the right fit for you. There is no invisible mandate that every relationship has to work out whether we are talking about a pony or a person.

                                  Comment


                                  • #77
                                    Originally posted by Rallycairn View Post

                                    I agree that Astro looks like a great guy, just not for your daughter right now, at this time. I'm guessing you know what a nice guy he is, and I'd love to ride him, myself! (I'm height challenged).
                                    LOL I thought the same thing. I'd like Astro.

                                    But even height challenged, I'm a lot bigger than that tiny 6 year old. He's a lot of horse for a pint-sized beginner.

                                    Comment

                                    • Original Poster

                                      #78
                                      Originally posted by Denali6298 View Post
                                      I think it’s a little much to expect a horse or pony that’s newish to a barn to deal with the amount of jet noise the OP is taking about. My horse was never bothered but I have zero clue what she would do with the proximity the OP is to a field. Hell we all jumped today at work when two jets flew really close to the building. It’s not normal even though I work on the flight line they were buzzing.
                                      This new pony has been at my barn for 7 weeks. The "regular" jet noise isn't a deal breaker for him, the time he bolted was when one banked directly over the ring, the ground shook and the poor pony likely thought it was the freaking apocalypse. I absolutely do not blame him for reacting that way at all. Things like that are very rare here but it does happen on occasion.

                                      This pony is 19, was someone else's first pony, that rider took him up the levels and made him a cute show pony. I thought 14.2 was a good size because we had an 11 leadline pony when she was 3 and she was rank as could be if you tried to actually RIDE her. Even for a big kid. So she went home and I decided the next would be big enough to have someone else ride when the occasion called for it. Again, this guy is 19, I don't expect him to need schooling. But. One never knows.

                                      I had a talk with my daughter and she she told me she isn't comfortable with the new pony anymore since the fall. She said she doesn't want to ride him anymore. That's fine, so he will go home. Thanks to everyone but Alibi for your kind replies.
                                      http://www.facebook.com/pages/Fentre...24774504235082

                                      http://fentressfieldsequestriancenter.com/

                                      Comment


                                      • #79
                                        That’s what I assumed happened. There is jet noise and then there is jet noise. I do think from the videos the pony may be a little much for her, but who’s to say she would have had a bad fall if it weren’t for the jet. I don’t think many of us could say what our horses would do, no matter how quiet, if a jet doing low level flying at high speed went over their arena.

                                        Comment


                                        • #80
                                          Originally posted by mpsbarnmanager View Post

                                          This new pony has been at my barn for 7 weeks. The "regular" jet noise isn't a deal breaker for him, the time he bolted was when one banked directly over the ring, the ground shook and the poor pony likely thought it was the freaking apocalypse. I absolutely do not blame him for reacting that way at all. Things like that are very rare here but it does happen on occasion.

                                          This pony is 19, was someone else's first pony, that rider took him up the levels and made him a cute show pony. I thought 14.2 was a good size because we had an 11 leadline pony when she was 3 and she was rank as could be if you tried to actually RIDE her. Even for a big kid. So she went home and I decided the next would be big enough to have someone else ride when the occasion called for it. Again, this guy is 19, I don't expect him to need schooling. But. One never knows.

                                          I had a talk with my daughter and she she told me she isn't comfortable with the new pony anymore since the fall. She said she doesn't want to ride him anymore. That's fine, so he will go home. Thanks to everyone but Alibi for your kind replies.
                                          That is one way COTH forums help, we get to tell our story and pick brains, all kinds of them.

                                          Then we can sort thru them what can be of help, there is always something to learn from that.

                                          Thanks for letting us know you resolved it just fine and all is well.

                                          Enjoy the travel thru kids growing up, you never know where it will lead next, but guaranteed it will be interesting.

                                          Comment

                                          Working...
                                          X