Sport Horse Spotlight

Sir Donnerhall_02Beelitz

Real Estate Spotlight

THC_1

Sale Spotlight

COTH_without Subscribe
  • Welcome to the Chronicle Forums.
    Please complete your profile. The forums and the rest of www.chronofhorse.com has single sign-in, so your log in information for one will automatically work for the other. Disclaimer: The opinions expressed here are the views of the individual and do not necessarily reflect the views and opinions of The Chronicle of the Horse.

Announcement

Collapse

Forum rules and no-advertising policy

As a participant on this forum, it is your responsibility to know and follow our rules. Please read this message in its entirety.

Board Rules

1. You�re responsible for what you say.
As outlined in Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act, The Chronicle of the Horse and its affiliates, as well Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd., the developers of vBulletin, are not legally responsible for statements made in the Forums.

This is a public forum viewed by a wide spectrum of people, so please be mindful of what you say and who might be reading it�details of personal disputes may be better handled privately. While posters are legally responsible for their statements, the moderators may in their discretion remove or edit posts, though are not legally obligated to do so, regardless of content.

Users have the ability to modify or delete their own messages after posting. Moderators generally will not delete posts, threads or accounts unless they have been alerted and have determined that a post, thread or user has violated the Forums� policies. Moderators do not regularly independently monitor the Forums for such violations.

Profanity, outright vulgarity, blatant personal insults or otherwise inappropriate statements will not be tolerated and will be dealt with at the discretion of the moderators.

Users may provide their positive or negative experiences with or opinions of companies, products, individuals, etc.; however, accounts involving allegations of criminal behavior against named individuals or companies MUST be first-hand accounts and may NOT be made anonymously.

If a situation has been reported upon by a reputable news source or addressed by law enforcement or the legal system it is open for discussion, but if an individual wants to make their own claims of criminal behavior against a named party in the course of that discussion, they too must identify themselves by first and last name and the account must be first-person.

Criminal allegations that do not satisfy these requirements, when brought to our attention, may be removed pending satisfaction of these criteria, and we reserve the right to err on the side of caution when making these determinations.

Credible threats of suicide will be reported to the police along with identifying user information at our disposal, in addition to referring the user to suicide helpline resources such as 1-800-SUICIDE or 1-800-273-TALK.

2. Conversations in horse-related forums should be horse-related.
The forums are a wonderful source of information and support for members of the horse community. While it�s understandably tempting to share information or search for input on other topics upon which members might have a similar level of knowledge, members must maintain the focus on horses.

3. Keep conversations productive, on topic and civil.
Discussion and disagreement are inevitable and encouraged; personal insults, diatribes and sniping comments are unproductive and unacceptable. Whether a subject is light-hearted or serious, keep posts focused on the current topic and of general interest to other participants of that thread. Utilize the private message feature or personal email where appropriate to address side topics or personal issues not related to the topic at large.

4. No advertising in the discussion forums.
Posts in the discussion forums directly or indirectly advertising horses, jobs, items or services for sale or wanted will be removed at the discretion of the moderators. Use of the private messaging feature or email addresses obtained through users� profiles for unsolicited advertising is not permitted.

Company representatives may participate in discussions and answer questions about their products or services, or suggest their products on recent threads if they fulfill the criteria of a query. False "testimonials" provided by company affiliates posing as general consumers are not appropriate, and self-promotion of sales, ad campaigns, etc. through the discussion forums is not allowed.

Paid advertising is available on our classifieds site and through the purchase of banner ads. The tightly monitored Giveaways forum permits free listings of genuinely free horses and items available or wanted (on a limited basis). Items offered for trade are not allowed.

Advertising Policy Specifics
When in doubt of whether something you want to post constitutes advertising, please contact a moderator privately in advance for further clarification. Refer to the following points for general guidelines:

Horses � Only general discussion about the buying, leasing, selling and pricing of horses is permitted. If the post contains, or links to, the type of specific information typically found in a sales or wanted ad, and it�s related to a horse for sale, regardless of who�s selling it, it doesn�t belong in the discussion forums.

Stallions � Board members may ask for suggestions on breeding stallion recommendations. Stallion owners may reply to such queries by suggesting their own stallions, only if their horse fits the specific criteria of the original poster. Excessive promotion of a stallion by its owner or related parties is not permitted and will be addressed at the discretion of the moderators.

Services � Members may use the forums to ask for general recommendations of trainers, barns, shippers, farriers, etc., and other members may answer those requests by suggesting themselves or their company, if their services fulfill the specific criteria of the original post. Members may not solicit other members for business if it is not in response to a direct, genuine query.

Products � While members may ask for general opinions and suggestions on equipment, trailers, trucks, etc., they may not list the specific attributes for which they are in the market, as such posts serve as wanted ads.

Event Announcements � Members may post one notification of an upcoming event that may be of interest to fellow members, if the original poster does not benefit financially from the event. Such threads may not be �bumped� excessively. Premium members may post their own notices in the Event Announcements forum.

Charities/Rescues � Announcements for charitable or fundraising events can only be made for 501(c)(3) tax-exempt organizations. Special exceptions may be made, at the moderators� discretion and direction, for board-related events or fundraising activities in extraordinary circumstances.

Occasional posts regarding horses available for adoption through IRS-registered horse rescue or placement programs are permitted in the appropriate forums, but these threads may be limited at the discretion of the moderators. Individuals may not advertise or make announcements for horses in need of rescue, placement or adoption unless the horse is available through a recognized rescue or placement agency or government-run entity or the thread fits the criteria for and is located in the Giveaways forum.

5. Do not post copyrighted photographs unless you have purchased that photo and have permission to do so.

6. Respect other members.
As members are often passionate about their beliefs and intentions can easily be misinterpreted in this type of environment, try to explore or resolve the inevitable disagreements that arise in the course of threads calmly and rationally.

If you see a post that you feel violates the rules of the board, please click the �alert� button (exclamation point inside of a triangle) in the bottom left corner of the post, which will alert ONLY the moderators to the post in question. They will then take whatever action, or no action, as deemed appropriate for the situation at their discretion. Do not air grievances regarding other posters or the moderators in the discussion forums.

Please be advised that adding another user to your �Ignore� list via your User Control Panel can be a useful tactic, which blocks posts and private messages by members whose commentary you�d rather avoid reading.

7. We have the right to reproduce statements made in the forums.
The Chronicle of the Horse may copy, quote, link to or otherwise reproduce posts, or portions of posts, in print or online for advertising or editorial purposes, if attributed to their original authors, and by posting in this forum, you hereby grant to The Chronicle of the Horse a perpetual, non-exclusive license under copyright and other rights, to do so.

8. We reserve the right to enforce and amend the rules.
The moderators may delete, edit, move or close any post or thread at any time, or refrain from doing any of the foregoing, in their discretion, and may suspend or revoke a user�s membership privileges at any time to maintain adherence to the rules and the general spirit of the forum. These rules may be amended at any time to address the current needs of the board.

Please see our full Terms of Service and Privacy Policy for more information.

Thanks for being a part of the COTH forums!

(Revised 5/9/18)
See more
See less

Riding Student falls- procedure and etiquette

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts
  • Original Poster

    Originally posted by mmeqcenter View Post
    She's 11, and ridden "off and on" for two years, if I'm remembering correctly. She is a green, inexperienced rider, and should not be expected to deal with or take charge of a pony pulling a bad habit that's getting her off. In my example where I fell off eight times in one lesson, I was a more experienced teen who was jumping 3'6''-4' and loved the greenies (still do). That is not the case with this young girl, and it is unfair to expect the exact same "mental toughness" out of everyone. Everyone's different, and obviously this lesson didn't "toughen her up" mentally, it broke her down instead.
    There's a reason (most) people start kids and new riders on safe "schoolmaster" types. They have to have solid "sea legs" and know how to handle the normal stuff before learning to deal with the tough stuff. A pony purposefully stopping and dropping the shoulder/head to get its rider off is not a safe schoolmaster. This rider was very obviously over-mounted. Yes, she should have sat back and pulled his head up. Clearly, she didn't know that, no one told her that, and/or she wasn't strong enough to do it. This is over-mounted, and possibly under-instructed. She should be allowed to learn strength and confidence on a safe mount; she can test her will and strength again on "Mr Head Dropper" after a year of practice, strength gain, and confidence-building.

    Honestly, OP, I'm not surprised either at the response from the BO/HT. They're sounding pretty defensive, so may be worried about a lawsuit. You can try to be as sensitive in the in-person discussion as you want, but be prepared for the exact same kind of response as you got in the text. My favorite trainer ever (obviously not the one I fell off eight times in one lesson with) would never have responded in such a way, she would have said absolutely she can ride a different one for a while, and when she's feeling more confident we'll put her back on the pony. Even before that, she'd have had an experienced rider come in and school the pony (trainer was like 6' tall or she'd have done it herself) for a few minutes after the kid fell off the second time, but it is what it is. People are who they are - when they show you, believe them.
    first the day she did her first poles and cross poles (is that what they're called?). 5 months ago
    https://youtu.be/UAcR-Ij3k40

    Then this is last day of summer camp this year. Cantering etc. July so roughly 4-6 weeks ago.
    ​​​​https://youtu.be/xBhdL_EOcQ0

    Comment

    • Original Poster

      Originally posted by Scribbler View Post
      You are not going to get any admission of responsibility in a text discussion because the barn knows perfectly well your next stop could be your lawyer if your medical insurer decides to sue for costs.

      Have a discussion in person about moving forward that does not involve trying to place blame. Your daughter clearly doesn't ride that well yet at least on emergencies and the trainers aren't alert enough to see that. It's perfectly fine for kid to want to return to riding on a quieter horse or at a walk.

      These COTH threads are full of adult riders discussing how they lost their nerve after a fall or injury. Somehow we expect kids to be more resilient or that its s moral failure if they develop fears. Much better to address fears same as if it was an adult beginner rider.
      first the day she did her first poles and cross poles (is that what they're called?). 5 months ago
      https://youtu.be/UAcR-Ij3k40

      Then this is last day of summer camp this year. Cantering etc. July so roughly 4-6 weeks ago.
      ​​​​https://youtu.be/xBhdL_EOcQ0

      Comment

      • Original Poster

        Originally posted by tbchick84 View Post
        I have a few lines of thought here.

        1. School horses can be stubborn and difficult since they have to deal with lots of green riders pulling, kicking, and flopping around up there. Most are saints, but once they get to the "screw this" point, they become dirty stoppers, buckers, etc. Personally, I would only put an experienced riders on a dirty stopper, which brings me to my next thought.

        2. I have no way of knowing what level of experience your daughter has. If she's coming unseated frequently, it suggests she does not have a secure seat. When she first started riding, did the trainer put her on a lunge line so she could develop a feel for proper seat and balance? Your daughter sounds like she could greatly benefit from a stronger foundation before moving onto cantering and certainly jumping. At the very least, I would ask that she be on a horse who show her the ropes until she is very comfortable up there. Until you can walk/trot/canter well, jumping should not be in the picture.

        3. With beginners, there seem to be two schools of thought. Some barns do lots of what are callled "up/down" lessons to help the new riders develop a feel for the horse. They learn how to post, leg placement, etc on a lunge line so they don't have to worry about steering or even controlling the horse. They make sure the students can W/T/C at all three gaits, before they even ride off the lunge line.

        The other extreme is the barn that puts your kid on a horse, hand them the reins and tell them to kick to go and pull to stop. These are kids that usually end up falling off a lot and most quickly lose interest in riding. While these are extremes, it does sounds your daughter is at the latter barn to an extent.

        4. As for the actual fall, if the head hit the ground at all, riding is done for that day. Get her checked for concussion. If she merely fell off and was just dirty but not broken, remount and move on. When in doubt , a visit to the urgent care center is never a bad idea. If your daughter continues to ride, you will start to see a pattern with doctors rolling their eyes every time she asks "when can I ride again?" While I hear your desire to run to her when she falls, she sounds like she's handling it just fine. Riders are a tough bunch. You mention she is shy. It will definitely help her find her voice. I'm sure you will see a positive change there. That all being said, her first lesson should have included how to fall safely. Always tuck and roll. It greatly lessens the impact and would have prevented a broken wrist. I'm guessing she tried to brace herself on landing.

        5. If you're watching the lessons and wondering if you have her with the right program and instructor, here are some things to look for. Does she look secure on the horse? Is she sitting up tall or is she slouched over and grabbing mane to save her balance? Is her lower leg still with her heels down, or is it dancing all over the place? Is she riding better at the end of her lessons than when she first got on? Watch lessons at some other barns if you can. You might notice some things for better or worse in comparison to your daughter's lessons. Most kids want to get to the jumping part, but she's young and has plenty of time to get there.

        You're a good mom for asking these questions. Sorry your daughter got hooked on such an expensive sport!
        first the day she did her first poles and cross poles (is that what they're called?). 5 months ago
        https://youtu.be/UAcR-Ij3k40

        Then this is last day of summer camp this year. Cantering etc. July so roughly 4-6 weeks ago.
        ​​​​https://youtu.be/xBhdL_EOcQ0

        Comment

        • Original Poster

          Originally posted by Belowthesalt View Post
          Just as an aside, sounds like the pony might just need a grazing overcheck.

          I, as an adult, have gotten back on with a broken wrist, but I broke it cleaning the stall (pulled on a muckcart handle and it came off, my arm hit the wall). I bandage it, rode (my own, reliable horse), went home and iced it. It kept hurting, went to the ER, Sigh, But I am an adult and to me it was "Oh, that was really dumb."

          I do think that your daughter is still very much a beginner and needs a program with more reliable horses/ponies, because, beginner or not, coming off three times in one lesson is too much. It is fortunate that it's ONLY a broken wrist.

          Is there a pony club in your area? Often they have ponies that are shared or loaned (outgrown by older kids, etc.). The "all around" nature of Pony Club, with grooming, stable management, etc., besides riding is excellent for any kid.
          first the day she did her first poles and cross poles (is that what they're called?). 5 months ago
          https://youtu.be/UAcR-Ij3k40

          Then this is last day of summer camp this year. Cantering etc. July so roughly 4-6 weeks ago.
          ​​​​https://youtu.be/xBhdL_EOcQ0

          Comment

          • Original Poster

            Originally posted by tbchick84 View Post
            I have a few lines of thought here.

            1. School horses can be stubborn and difficult since they have to deal with lots of green riders pulling, kicking, and flopping around up there. Most are saints, but once they get to the "screw this" point, they become dirty stoppers, buckers, etc. Personally, I would only put an experienced riders on a dirty stopper, which brings me to my next thought.

            2. I have no way of knowing what level of experience your daughter has. If she's coming unseated frequently, it suggests she does not have a secure seat. When she first started riding, did the trainer put her on a lunge line so she could develop a feel for proper seat and balance? Your daughter sounds like she could greatly benefit from a stronger foundation before moving onto cantering and certainly jumping. At the very least, I would ask that she be on a horse who show her the ropes until she is very comfortable up there. Until you can walk/trot/canter well, jumping should not be in the picture.

            3. With beginners, there seem to be two schools of thought. Some barns do lots of what are callled "up/down" lessons to help the new riders develop a feel for the horse. They learn how to post, leg placement, etc on a lunge line so they don't have to worry about steering or even controlling the horse. They make sure the students can W/T/C at all three gaits, before they even ride off the lunge line.

            The other extreme is the barn that puts your kid on a horse, hand them the reins and tell them to kick to go and pull to stop. These are kids that usually end up falling off a lot and most quickly lose interest in riding. While these are extremes, it does sounds your daughter is at the latter barn to an extent.

            4. As for the actual fall, if the head hit the ground at all, riding is done for that day. Get her checked for concussion. If she merely fell off and was just dirty but not broken, remount and move on. When in doubt , a visit to the urgent care center is never a bad idea. If your daughter continues to ride, you will start to see a pattern with doctors rolling their eyes every time she asks "when can I ride again?" While I hear your desire to run to her when she falls, she sounds like she's handling it just fine. Riders are a tough bunch. You mention she is shy. It will definitely help her find her voice. I'm sure you will see a positive change there. That all being said, her first lesson should have included how to fall safely. Always tuck and roll. It greatly lessens the impact and would have prevented a broken wrist. I'm guessing she tried to brace herself on landing.

            5. If you're watching the lessons and wondering if you have her with the right program and instructor, here are some things to look for. Does she look secure on the horse? Is she sitting up tall or is she slouched over and grabbing mane to save her balance? Is her lower leg still with her heels down, or is it dancing all over the place? Is she riding better at the end of her lessons than when she first got on? Watch lessons at some other barns if you can. You might notice some things for better or worse in comparison to your daughter's lessons. Most kids want to get to the jumping part, but she's young and has plenty of time to get there.

            You're a good mom for asking these questions. Sorry your daughter got hooked on such an expensive sport!
            first the day she did her first poles and cross poles (is that what they're called?). 5 months ago
            https://youtu.be/UAcR-Ij3k40

            Then this is last day of summer camp this year. Cantering etc. July so roughly 4-6 weeks ago.
            ​​​​https://youtu.be/xBhdL_EOcQ0

            Comment


            • Just watching the video. Your daughter is at the stage of rising from her stirrups at the trot. Her seat is very loose. She really is not ready for cross rails even though her second effort was quite nice.

              Her canter also shows her relying on her stirrups and bouncing in the canter.

              She really does need longe work without stirrups to help her stabilize that seat., and position.
              Last edited by merrygoround; Sep. 8, 2019, 10:19 AM. Reason: Spelling
              Some riders change their horse, they change their saddle, they change their teacher; they never change themselves.

              Remember the horse does all the work, we just sit there and look pretty.

              Comment


              • I'm not sure what you're trying to accomplish by showing us those videos? Very cute little rider and she's doing a great job, but yes, obviously quite green and insecure (physically) in her position.
                Yes, "cross poles" is correct, or "cross rails".
                She went over Xs before she first cantered? That's a strange progression. Some trainers feel the need to start them over poles and fences ASAP to prevent them from getting bored. Doesn't make it okay.

                Poles are fine, but I don't let them jump until they can walk, trot, and canter without stirrups.
                Custom tack racks!
                www.mmeqcenter.com/tacklove.html

                Comment

                • Original Poster

                  Originally posted by mmeqcenter View Post
                  I'm not sure what you're trying to accomplish by showing us those videos? Very cute little rider and she's doing a great job, but yes, obviously quite green and insecure (physically) in her position.
                  Yes, "cross poles" is correct, or "cross rails".
                  She went over Xs before she first cantered? That's a strange progression. Some trainers feel the need to start them over poles and fences ASAP to prevent them from getting bored. Doesn't make it okay.

                  Poles are fine, but I don't let them jump until they can walk, trot, and canter without stirrups.
                  I was trying to get confirmation on everyone's assessment. I see if more now that she is insecure up there but thought those coaches and trainers could confirm.

                  Comment

                  • Original Poster

                    Originally posted by merrygoround View Post
                    Just watching the video. Your daughter is at the stage of rising from her stirrups at the trot. Her seat is very loose. She really is not ready for cross rails even though her second effort was quite nice.

                    Her canter also shows her relying on her stirrups and bouncing in the canter.

                    She really does need longe work without stirrups to help her stabilize that seat., and position.
                    Thanks for your assessment. I was posting to try and confirm some of what everyone was saying.

                    Comment


                    • Very loose core, resulting in loose seat. This is why camp instructor is yelling “sit up...TALLER” so many times.

                      No, I would not be jumping this kid. She could, at her level, do entire courses of trot poles, focusing on path, using corners, pace, position...

                      She would be on the longe for a portion of the lesson, lots of trot minus stirrups: doing arm circles, two point no hands, around the world, and other movements to develop her seat and core.

                      All programs are different.
                      You could find a good dressage program because they focus on seat, if there are not H/J programs locally who produce balanced, strong riders.
                      Branch out to jumping after she can W/T/C without stirrups or reins.

                      Comment

                      • Original Poster

                        Originally posted by Arlomine View Post
                        Very loose core, resulting in loose seat. This is why camp instructor is yelling “sit up...TALLER” so many times.

                        No, I would not be jumping this kid. She could, at her level, do entire courses of trot poles, focusing on path, using corners, pace, position...

                        She would be on the longe for a portion of the lesson, lots of trot minus stirrups: doing arm circles, two point no hands, around the world, and other movements to develop her seat and core.

                        All programs are different.
                        You could find a good dressage program because they focus on seat, if there are not H/J programs locally who produce balanced, strong riders.
                        Branch out to jumping after she can W/T/C without stirrups or reins.
                        Thanks! She only ever went over poles and cross rails... No "jumping" beyond that. Thank you for your input instruction...I am definitely taking notes to possibly find a new program!

                        Would you recommend off horse workouts like one suggested pilates? She is off for 4 more weeks due to her wrist and could be strengthening her stomach muscles at the very least
                        Last edited by darcilyna; Sep. 8, 2019, 12:40 PM.

                        Comment


                        • The biggest thing I am noticing right away is that her foot is way too far in the stirrup to be safe--it is common for kids to loose the placement of their foot in the stirrup when they are first learning, but we immediately bring them back to a walk and correct it. Cantering and jumping with that foot placement not only does not allow her to properly have her heel down, it is unsafe if she were to fall off as her foot could get caught in the stirrup(although with the safety stirrups it isn't as big of a concern). But maybe it is just that moment in the video and she isn't that way that often. But if it is, I would say she is in no way ready for IEA.

                          Comment


                          • Nice beginner kid.

                            Her seat is very unstable at the center, she pops up and lands on the horses back at every stride. No balance for surviving problems or the unexpected. I also notice at the very end of the video her arms are very straight and she gets pulled forward as the horse lowers his head after he halts.

                            She's just a beginner kid without a real independent seat yet who does not have the physical skills to school a naughty pony or stick on during problems. That said, she has a nice tidy look about her riding and may be naturally comfortable up there. May have natural aptitude.

                            But riding is a high risk high skill sport. You need a lot of practice to be safe at it. More than even downhill skiing or white water kayaking. It's not a sport you can dabble in safely.

                            Comment


                            • Originally posted by darcilyna View Post

                              first the day she did her first poles and cross poles (is that what they're called?). 5 months ago
                              https://youtu.be/UAcR-Ij3k40

                              Then this is last day of summer camp this year. Cantering etc. July so roughly 4-6 weeks ago.
                              ​​​​https://youtu.be/xBhdL_EOcQ0
                              There is so much wrong in that 2nd video that I almost don't know where to start. The biggest thing that jumps out at me is that this trainer has a school horse in draw reins or a neck stretcher (can't quite tell exactly what it is from the video). With a green beginner on it's back. If your school horse needs draw reins or a neck stretcher for a beginner to ride it, then this is not an appropriate mount! I'm not anti-draw reins either but WTH.

                              Then we have the fact that the horse repeatedly cross canters and will not hold the lead with its hind end. Swaps leads back and forth behind many time during that first end. That's a sign of hind end issues.

                              Your daughter is a nice little beginner. But she is exactly that. A very green beginner who does not have her balance, a deep heel, or a strong core. She should not be doing IEA. I'm sorry you've already paid, but I would not continue with that even if it means losing the money.

                              And find a new trainer/barn immediately.

                              Comment

                              • Original Poster

                                Originally posted by Scribbler;n10472thajs 799
                                Nice beginner kid.

                                Her seat is very unstable at the center, she pops up and lands on the horses back at every stride. No balance for surviving problems or the unexpected. I also notice at the very end of the video her arms are very straight and she gets pulled forward as the horse lowers his head after he halts.

                                She's just a beginner kid without a real independent seat yet who does not have the physical skills to school a naughty pony or stick on during problems. That said, she has a nice tidy look about her riding and may be naturally comfortable up there. May have natural aptitude.

                                But riding is a high risk high skill sport. You need a lot of practice to be safe at it. More than even downhill skiing or white water kayaking. It's not a sport you can dabble in safely.
                                Thanks for your input!

                                She says that the small bounce during trot is
                                sitting the trot
                                And that she is supposed to learn a canter sitting
                                Then you learn "light seat" (says she is at that point)

                                I've been trying to ask her without making judgement just about how she has learned and where she is at.... She seems overly confident which is kindof her MO ;-)

                                I am trying to learn and make a big decision as to whether to discuss some of this with her current trainers or just find a barn with better instruction.

                                Comment

                                • Original Poster

                                  Originally posted by staceymc View Post

                                  There is so much wrong in that 2nd video that I almost don't know where to start. The biggest thing that jumps out at me is that this trainer has a school horse in draw reins or a neck stretcher (can't quite tell exactly what it is from the video). With a green beginner on it's back. If your school horse needs draw reins or a neck stretcher for a beginner to ride it, then this is not an appropriate mount! I'm not anti-draw reins either but WTH.

                                  Then we have the fact that the horse repeatedly cross canters and will not hold the lead with its hind end. Swaps leads back and forth behind many time during that first end. That's a sign of hind end issues.

                                  Your daughter is a nice little beginner. But she is exactly that. A very green beginner who does not have her balance, a deep heel, or a strong core. She should not be doing IEA. I'm sorry you've already paid, but I would not continue with that even if it means losing the money.

                                  And find a new trainer/barn immediately.
                                  Thanks for your input. I appreciate the honesty.

                                  Comment


                                  • Originally posted by darcilyna View Post

                                    Thanks for your input!

                                    She says that the small bounce during trot is
                                    sitting the trot
                                    And that she is supposed to learn a canter sitting
                                    Then you learn "light seat" (says she is at that point)

                                    I've been trying to ask her without making judgement just about how she has learned and where she is at.... She seems overly confident which is kindof her MO ;-)

                                    I am trying to learn and make a big decision as to whether to discuss some of this with her current trainers or just find a barn with better instruction.
                                    She should learn a sitting canter, absolutely, before she learns light seat. But right now she is not able to sit the canter. She is being tossed in the air at each stride. I didn't pick up on the fact that the horse is swapping leads behind, but that would make it harder to sit. However, she just doesn't have the balance or strength to sit the canter yet. She needs a bunch of longue lessons to get that seat, before she is asked to pilot a horse around even a course of poles independently. Either that or do what I did, which was hold onto the saddle horn and race my pony up the Gravel Pit Road with my risk-taking little friends because we knew the horses would all slow down running up the side of the quarry so we were safe to Yee Haw!!!

                                    What I mean is she needs practice to build that seat because right now she is one stumble or spook away from just toppling off.

                                    Confident is great. Build on that confidence. Get her good teachers and allow her to take enough lessons to really get somewhere (of course dependent on your own finances, I realize not everyone can afford that).

                                    Sitting trot your butt should never leave the seat, you sit in and kind of bloooop along.

                                    The confidence and the comfort on the horse is a fantastic gift, and she looks nice up there. Just don't let poor teachers destroy that confidence and comfort by pushing her too hard or skipping out the basics because they don't understand them themselves.
                                    Last edited by Scribbler; Sep. 8, 2019, 11:53 PM.

                                    Comment


                                    • go find a better barn.

                                      the instructors can't fix what they don't know how to fix. I would not bother discussing it with them. The injury makes a good chance to just go check out some different barns after daughter is mobile. Go do some trial lessons, and if you find a place that suits, just start up there.

                                      If it turns out that your original barn is indeed the best choice in a thin market and everything else is a scary mudpit, then you can go back to the original barn and at that point request that she have some attention paid to her seat and balance.

                                      Comment

                                      • Original Poster

                                        Originally posted by staceymc View Post

                                        There is so much wrong in that 2nd video that I almost don't know where to start. The biggest thing that jumps out at me is that this trainer has a school horse in draw reins or a neck stretcher (can't quite tell exactly what it is from the video). With a green beginner on it's back. If your school horse needs draw reins or a neck stretcher for a beginner to ride it, then this is not an appropriate mount! I'm not anti-draw reins either but WTH.

                                        Then we have the fact that the horse repeatedly cross canters and will not hold the lead with its hind end. Swaps leads back and forth behind many time during that first end. That's a sign of hind end issues.

                                        Your daughter is a nice little beginner. But she is exactly that. A very green beginner who does not have her balance, a deep heel, or a strong core. She should not be doing IEA. I'm sorry you've already paid, but I would not continue with that even if it means losing the money.

                                        And find a new trainer/barn immediately.
                                        DD says it's a neck stretcher because the horse is "used to having contact with his mouth"
                                        🤷
                                        Last edited by darcilyna; Sep. 8, 2019, 06:40 PM.

                                        Comment


                                        • If I may add one more question to ask- if the barn has a summer camp, ask them what happens to the ponies after camp. Some barns drop off camp horses into the slaughter pipeline, or couch it as getting a new string every year. Good barns do not do this. My current barn uses lesson horses for camps and we keep the horses forever. It goes to philosophy and horse care

                                          Comment

                                          Working...
                                          X