Sport Horse Spotlight

Total Hope-11-18-09-3662

Real Estate Spotlight

UMS_01

Sale Spotlight

COTH_without Subscribe
  • Welcome to the Chronicle Forums.
    Please complete your profile. The forums and the rest of www.chronofhorse.com has single sign-in, so your log in information for one will automatically work for the other. Disclaimer: The opinions expressed here are the views of the individual and do not necessarily reflect the views and opinions of The Chronicle of the Horse.

Announcement

Collapse

Forum rules and no-advertising policy

As a participant on this forum, it is your responsibility to know and follow our rules. Please read this message in its entirety.

Board Rules

1. You�re responsible for what you say.
As outlined in Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act, The Chronicle of the Horse and its affiliates, as well Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd., the developers of vBulletin, are not legally responsible for statements made in the Forums.

This is a public forum viewed by a wide spectrum of people, so please be mindful of what you say and who might be reading it�details of personal disputes may be better handled privately. While posters are legally responsible for their statements, the moderators may in their discretion remove or edit posts, though are not legally obligated to do so, regardless of content.

Users have the ability to modify or delete their own messages after posting. Moderators generally will not delete posts, threads or accounts unless they have been alerted and have determined that a post, thread or user has violated the Forums� policies. Moderators do not regularly independently monitor the Forums for such violations.

Profanity, outright vulgarity, blatant personal insults or otherwise inappropriate statements will not be tolerated and will be dealt with at the discretion of the moderators.

Users may provide their positive or negative experiences with or opinions of companies, products, individuals, etc.; however, accounts involving allegations of criminal behavior against named individuals or companies MUST be first-hand accounts and may NOT be made anonymously.

If a situation has been reported upon by a reputable news source or addressed by law enforcement or the legal system it is open for discussion, but if an individual wants to make their own claims of criminal behavior against a named party in the course of that discussion, they too must identify themselves by first and last name and the account must be first-person.

Criminal allegations that do not satisfy these requirements, when brought to our attention, may be removed pending satisfaction of these criteria, and we reserve the right to err on the side of caution when making these determinations.

Credible threats of suicide will be reported to the police along with identifying user information at our disposal, in addition to referring the user to suicide helpline resources such as 1-800-SUICIDE or 1-800-273-TALK.

2. Conversations in horse-related forums should be horse-related.
The forums are a wonderful source of information and support for members of the horse community. While it�s understandably tempting to share information or search for input on other topics upon which members might have a similar level of knowledge, members must maintain the focus on horses.

3. Keep conversations productive, on topic and civil.
Discussion and disagreement are inevitable and encouraged; personal insults, diatribes and sniping comments are unproductive and unacceptable. Whether a subject is light-hearted or serious, keep posts focused on the current topic and of general interest to other participants of that thread. Utilize the private message feature or personal email where appropriate to address side topics or personal issues not related to the topic at large.

4. No advertising in the discussion forums.
Posts in the discussion forums directly or indirectly advertising horses, jobs, items or services for sale or wanted will be removed at the discretion of the moderators. Use of the private messaging feature or email addresses obtained through users� profiles for unsolicited advertising is not permitted.

Company representatives may participate in discussions and answer questions about their products or services, or suggest their products on recent threads if they fulfill the criteria of a query. False "testimonials" provided by company affiliates posing as general consumers are not appropriate, and self-promotion of sales, ad campaigns, etc. through the discussion forums is not allowed.

Paid advertising is available on our classifieds site and through the purchase of banner ads. The tightly monitored Giveaways forum permits free listings of genuinely free horses and items available or wanted (on a limited basis). Items offered for trade are not allowed.

Advertising Policy Specifics
When in doubt of whether something you want to post constitutes advertising, please contact a moderator privately in advance for further clarification. Refer to the following points for general guidelines:

Horses � Only general discussion about the buying, leasing, selling and pricing of horses is permitted. If the post contains, or links to, the type of specific information typically found in a sales or wanted ad, and it�s related to a horse for sale, regardless of who�s selling it, it doesn�t belong in the discussion forums.

Stallions � Board members may ask for suggestions on breeding stallion recommendations. Stallion owners may reply to such queries by suggesting their own stallions, only if their horse fits the specific criteria of the original poster. Excessive promotion of a stallion by its owner or related parties is not permitted and will be addressed at the discretion of the moderators.

Services � Members may use the forums to ask for general recommendations of trainers, barns, shippers, farriers, etc., and other members may answer those requests by suggesting themselves or their company, if their services fulfill the specific criteria of the original post. Members may not solicit other members for business if it is not in response to a direct, genuine query.

Products � While members may ask for general opinions and suggestions on equipment, trailers, trucks, etc., they may not list the specific attributes for which they are in the market, as such posts serve as wanted ads.

Event Announcements � Members may post one notification of an upcoming event that may be of interest to fellow members, if the original poster does not benefit financially from the event. Such threads may not be �bumped� excessively. Premium members may post their own notices in the Event Announcements forum.

Charities/Rescues � Announcements for charitable or fundraising events can only be made for 501(c)(3) tax-exempt organizations. Special exceptions may be made, at the moderators� discretion and direction, for board-related events or fundraising activities in extraordinary circumstances.

Occasional posts regarding horses available for adoption through IRS-registered horse rescue or placement programs are permitted in the appropriate forums, but these threads may be limited at the discretion of the moderators. Individuals may not advertise or make announcements for horses in need of rescue, placement or adoption unless the horse is available through a recognized rescue or placement agency or government-run entity or the thread fits the criteria for and is located in the Giveaways forum.

5. Do not post copyrighted photographs unless you have purchased that photo and have permission to do so.

6. Respect other members.
As members are often passionate about their beliefs and intentions can easily be misinterpreted in this type of environment, try to explore or resolve the inevitable disagreements that arise in the course of threads calmly and rationally.

If you see a post that you feel violates the rules of the board, please click the �alert� button (exclamation point inside of a triangle) in the bottom left corner of the post, which will alert ONLY the moderators to the post in question. They will then take whatever action, or no action, as deemed appropriate for the situation at their discretion. Do not air grievances regarding other posters or the moderators in the discussion forums.

Please be advised that adding another user to your �Ignore� list via your User Control Panel can be a useful tactic, which blocks posts and private messages by members whose commentary you�d rather avoid reading.

7. We have the right to reproduce statements made in the forums.
The Chronicle of the Horse may copy, quote, link to or otherwise reproduce posts, or portions of posts, in print or online for advertising or editorial purposes, if attributed to their original authors, and by posting in this forum, you hereby grant to The Chronicle of the Horse a perpetual, non-exclusive license under copyright and other rights, to do so.

8. We reserve the right to enforce and amend the rules.
The moderators may delete, edit, move or close any post or thread at any time, or refrain from doing any of the foregoing, in their discretion, and may suspend or revoke a user�s membership privileges at any time to maintain adherence to the rules and the general spirit of the forum. These rules may be amended at any time to address the current needs of the board.

Please see our full Terms of Service and Privacy Policy for more information.

Thanks for being a part of the COTH forums!

(Revised 5/9/18)
See more
See less

Riding Student falls- procedure and etiquette

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #41
    I have a few lines of thought here.

    1. School horses can be stubborn and difficult since they have to deal with lots of green riders pulling, kicking, and flopping around up there. Most are saints, but once they get to the "screw this" point, they become dirty stoppers, buckers, etc. Personally, I would only put an experienced riders on a dirty stopper, which brings me to my next thought.

    2. I have no way of knowing what level of experience your daughter has. If she's coming unseated frequently, it suggests she does not have a secure seat. When she first started riding, did the trainer put her on a lunge line so she could develop a feel for proper seat and balance? Your daughter sounds like she could greatly benefit from a stronger foundation before moving onto cantering and certainly jumping. At the very least, I would ask that she be on a horse who show her the ropes until she is very comfortable up there. Until you can walk/trot/canter well, jumping should not be in the picture.

    3. With beginners, there seem to be two schools of thought. Some barns do lots of what are callled "up/down" lessons to help the new riders develop a feel for the horse. They learn how to post, leg placement, etc on a lunge line so they don't have to worry about steering or even controlling the horse. They make sure the students can W/T/C at all three gaits, before they even ride off the lunge line.

    The other extreme is the barn that puts your kid on a horse, hand them the reins and tell them to kick to go and pull to stop. These are kids that usually end up falling off a lot and most quickly lose interest in riding. While these are extremes, it does sounds your daughter is at the latter barn to an extent.

    4. As for the actual fall, if the head hit the ground at all, riding is done for that day. Get her checked for concussion. If she merely fell off and was just dirty but not broken, remount and move on. When in doubt , a visit to the urgent care center is never a bad idea. If your daughter continues to ride, you will start to see a pattern with doctors rolling their eyes every time she asks "when can I ride again?" While I hear your desire to run to her when she falls, she sounds like she's handling it just fine. Riders are a tough bunch. You mention she is shy. It will definitely help her find her voice. I'm sure you will see a positive change there. That all being said, her first lesson should have included how to fall safely. Always tuck and roll. It greatly lessens the impact and would have prevented a broken wrist. I'm guessing she tried to brace herself on landing.

    5. If you're watching the lessons and wondering if you have her with the right program and instructor, here are some things to look for. Does she look secure on the horse? Is she sitting up tall or is she slouched over and grabbing mane to save her balance? Is her lower leg still with her heels down, or is it dancing all over the place? Is she riding better at the end of her lessons than when she first got on? Watch lessons at some other barns if you can. You might notice some things for better or worse in comparison to your daughter's lessons. Most kids want to get to the jumping part, but she's young and has plenty of time to get there.

    You're a good mom for asking these questions. Sorry your daughter got hooked on such an expensive sport!
    "Do what you can't do"

    Comment


    • #42
      Just NO.
      darcilyna As a non-rider Mom you have to be confident the program is safe.
      What you describe - including the EMT co-owner - does not sound safe.

      Maybe for older riders with more experience, maybe.
      But for an 11yo with a mere 2 years of lessons (weekly? more often?) she is indeed a very novice/green horseperson, and in what dounds like a not very safe program.

      I question a trainer who permitted this horse to dump her a third time.
      IM(50+yrs of experience)O, trainer should have gotten on after the 1st stop, most definitely after the 2nd to school the Stop out of this horse.
      And probably suggested another mount for your daughter, even if trainer got the horse over the fence.
      We know so much more about concussion today, it is not promising that EMT-owner did not include that in her advice to get to an ER.

      Please consider another lesson barn.
      Part of your interview should include the scenario you describe.

      I was a shy kid too, learning to ride in the 1950's when liability was never an issue.
      And the "Get back on" school of thought ruled.
      Looking back, I had some very questionable rides on some very sketchy "school horses".
      My non-rider Mom stopped watching lessons after a kid came off in a group lesson, horse fell too & getting up placed a hoof square on his chest.
      We all stopped breathing, but TG, humans are squooshy, unsure footing & horse did not put weight on that foot.
      IIRC, kid did get back on.
      Everafter, Mom would drop me off, sit outside & collect me post-lesson.
      Times have changed.





      *friend of bar.ka*RIP all my lovely boys, gone too soon:
      Steppin' Out 1988-2004
      Hey Vern! 1982-2009, Cash's Bay Threat 1994-2009
      Sam(Jaybee Altair) 1994-2015

      Comment


      • #43
        I skimmed most of the posts so I am probably repeating others. OP your daughter is a green/beginner rider. Nothing wrong with that. Four falls in the last 2.5 years isn’t terrible. Falls do happen and if one continues in this sport one has to accept that. However, if three of those falls happen in one lesson that’s a red flag that the instructor/trainer over mounted your daughter. Especially if the horse pulled the same thing with the instructor/trainer.

        If your daughter is too shy to speak up about riding a different horse until she has the seat to stay on that maneuver you need to be her advocate. I’m all about people riding challenging (for them) horses to improve but a horse pulling the same stunt with an experienced rider is very much not suitable for daughter right now.

        I do not know anything about incident reports and I’ve never gotten one.

        Comment

        • Original Poster

          #44
          Originally posted by tbchick84 View Post
          I have a few lines of thought here.

          1. School horses can be stubborn and difficult since they have to deal with lots of green riders pulling, kicking, and flopping around up there. Most are saints, but once they get to the "screw this" point, they become dirty stoppers, buckers, etc. Personally, I would only put an experienced riders on a dirty stopper, which brings me to my next thought.

          2. I have no way of knowing what level of experience your daughter has. If she's coming unseated frequently, it suggests she does not have a secure seat. When she first started riding, did the trainer put her on a lunge line so she could develop a feel for proper seat and balance? Your daughter sounds like she could greatly benefit from a stronger foundation before moving onto cantering and certainly jumping. At the very least, I would ask that she be on a horse who show her the ropes until she is very comfortable up there. Until you can walk/trot/canter well, jumping should not be in the picture.

          3. With beginners, there seem to be two schools of thought. Some barns do lots of what are callled "up/down" lessons to help the new riders develop a feel for the horse. They learn how to post, leg placement, etc on a lunge line so they don't have to worry about steering or even controlling the horse. They make sure the students can W/T/C at all three gaits, before they even ride off the lunge line.

          The other extreme is the barn that puts your kid on a horse, hand them the reins and tell them to kick to go and pull to stop. These are kids that usually end up falling off a lot and most quickly lose interest in riding. While these are extremes, it does sounds your daughter is at the latter barn to an extent.

          4. As for the actual fall, if the head hit the ground at all, riding is done for that day. Get her checked for concussion. If she merely fell off and was just dirty but not broken, remount and move on. When in doubt , a visit to the urgent care center is never a bad idea. If your daughter continues to ride, you will start to see a pattern with doctors rolling their eyes every time she asks "when can I ride again?" While I hear your desire to run to her when she falls, she sounds like she's handling it just fine. Riders are a tough bunch. You mention she is shy. It will definitely help her find her voice. I'm sure you will see a positive change there. That all being said, her first lesson should have included how to fall safely. Always tuck and roll. It greatly lessens the impact and would have prevented a broken wrist. I'm guessing she tried to brace herself on landing.

          5. If you're watching the lessons and wondering if you have her with the right program and instructor, here are some things to look for. Does she look secure on the horse? Is she sitting up tall or is she slouched over and grabbing mane to save her balance? Is her lower leg still with her heels down, or is it dancing all over the place? Is she riding better at the end of her lessons than when she first got on? Watch lessons at some other barns if you can. You might notice some things for better or worse in comparison to your daughter's lessons. Most kids want to get to the jumping part, but she's young and has plenty of time to get there.

          You're a good mom for asking these questions. Sorry your daughter got hooked on such an expensive sport!
          i don't know all the terminology but her first couple years of lessons were all up down/ up down up down.... She did the full day camp last summer at that pace and has averaged 2 lessons per month for about 2 years. Just this summer at camp did they advance her to canter and beyond posting at the trot to a sitting trot.

          She may need a slower advancement than she is getting it it's possible her trainer just isn't versed with what to do in this exact horse behavior. This is a new-ish trainer to this barn albeit she came to them with tons of experience!
          ​​​​​​
          ​​​​​Some horse knowledgeable parents who have seen her ride complimented her riding which surprised me I have no idea if she is average or progressing well really. The head trainer worked with her one time and suggested IEA. I agree she is green in terms of experience but she's not just flopping around up there or kicking randomly.... I wish I could post video or photos. I suppose I could figure that out
          Last edited by darcilyna; Sep. 4, 2019, 11:52 PM.

          Comment

          • Original Poster

            #45
            A few people have mentioned jumping. They were not jumping in this lesson. Just basic walk trot canter. The pony was stopping and dropping his head/neck without warning. 3 falls were not 30 minutes into the lesson.

            Also during tack up, this pony did NOT want the bit in it's it's mouth. The trainer had to assist as my daughter usually handles all of the tack up no problem.

            Also as an aside we have have overall been happy with this barn up until the last few months!

            Comment

            • Original Poster

              #46
              Originally posted by 2DogsFarm View Post
              Just NO.
              darcilyna As a non-rider Mom you have to be confident the program is safe.
              What you describe - including the EMT co-owner - does not sound safe.

              Maybe for older riders with more experience, maybe.
              But for an 11yo with a mere 2 years of lessons (weekly? more often?) she is indeed a very novice/green horseperson, and in what dounds like a not very safe program.

              I question a trainer who permitted this horse to dump her a third time.
              IM(50+yrs of experience)O, trainer should have gotten on after the 1st stop, most definitely after the 2nd to school the Stop out of this horse.
              And probably suggested another mount for your daughter, even if trainer got the horse over the fence.
              We know so much more about concussion today, it is not promising that EMT-owner did not include that in her advice to get to an ER.

              Please consider another lesson barn.
              Part of your interview should include the scenario you describe.

              I was a shy kid too, learning to ride in the 1950's when liability was never an issue.
              And the "Get back on" school of thought ruled.
              Looking back, I had some very questionable rides on some very sketchy "school horses".
              My non-rider Mom stopped watching lessons after a kid came off in a group lesson, horse fell too & getting up placed a hoof square on his chest.
              We all stopped breathing, but TG, humans are squooshy, unsure footing & horse did not put weight on that foot.
              IIRC, kid did get back on.
              Everafter, Mom would drop me off, sit outside & collect me post-lesson.
              Times have changed.




              I did not do a good job giving a play by play of each step of intervention. The EMT co owner was fetched because of the potential concussion symptoms. He did a short exam and we discussed her symptoms. Through discussion and assessment it was ruled out. A) her condition improved quickly. B) it is not uncommon for dd to fall/half faint when nauseated as she has done so before when she had a virus. C) she had eaten a bit right before her lesson

              There also was a PT on site one of the mom's. We all AGREED that Ortho was the most pressing concern. ..but to keep an eye out for concussion symptoms. This was discussed seriously and I agreed.

              We tried going to the Ortho express but they were closing so we went to the ER anyways .... Probably for the best

              Comment


              • #47
                Originally posted by darcilyna View Post
                A few people have mentioned jumping. They were not jumping in this lesson. Just basic walk trot canter. The pony was stopping and dropping his head/neck without warning. 3 falls were not 30 minutes into the lesson.
                This is simple terminology confusion. The term dirty stop is used to refer to a horse that is coming up to a jump, but refuses/stops at the last second and without warning. Dirty stop isn't a term most would use on the flat.

                I'd encourage you not to overreact, but to be a bit more pro-active. Falls are going to happen, but you can talk to the barn about making sure they call you if you aren't present. You can also express your desire to not have her re-mount unless they are absolutely sure she is fine.

                If you've been happy with the other horses she's ridden, I'd also discuss with them not having her ride this particular horse for a while. 3 falls in one day isn't impossible, but at the beginner level I would consider the rider over-mounted relative to current skill level and stop putting them back on - or put them back on but only to have them do something easy and unrelated (like trot a circle on the lunge line) and get off.

                Comment


                • #48
                  Just as an aside, sounds like the pony might just need a grazing overcheck.

                  I, as an adult, have gotten back on with a broken wrist, but I broke it cleaning the stall (pulled on a muckcart handle and it came off, my arm hit the wall). I bandage it, rode (my own, reliable horse), went home and iced it. It kept hurting, went to the ER, Sigh, But I am an adult and to me it was "Oh, that was really dumb."

                  I do think that your daughter is still very much a beginner and needs a program with more reliable horses/ponies, because, beginner or not, coming off three times in one lesson is too much. It is fortunate that it's ONLY a broken wrist.

                  Is there a pony club in your area? Often they have ponies that are shared or loaned (outgrown by older kids, etc.). The "all around" nature of Pony Club, with grooming, stable management, etc., besides riding is excellent for any kid.

                  Comment


                  • #49
                    Used to drive me nuts when I had to kill 15 minutes and sign off at the Y for a band aid or wasp sting. If it needs stitches or a visit to the ER then OK.

                    I think in this particular instance your daughter got tenser as she fell and the instructor just did not recognize that. Riding instructors often have no formal training in how to teach and use their own experiences, if they are confident they sometimes don’t understand a shy child failing to speak up.
                    In your dd’s favor the instructor probably thought she WAS capable and was focusing now on schooling the pony.
                    Courageous Weenie Eventer Wannabe
                    Incredible Invisible

                    Comment


                    • #50
                      Originally posted by darcilyna View Post

                      i don't know all the terminology but her first couple years of lessons were all up down/ up down up down.... She did the full day camp last summer at that pace and has averaged 2 lessons per month for about 2 years. Just this summer at camp did they advance her to canter and beyond posting at the trot to a sitting trot.

                      She may need a slower advancement than she is getting it it's possible her trainer just isn't versed with what to do in this exact horse behavior. This is a new-ish trainer to this barn albeit she came to them with tons of experience!
                      ​​​​​​
                      ​​​​​Every parent who sees her ride compliments her riding. The head trainer worked with her one time and suggested IEA. I agree she is green in terms of experience but she's not just flopping around up there or kicking randomly.... I wish I could post video or photos. I suppose I could figure that out
                      That sounds all good. It sounds like she is being brought along properly. Maybe it was just what you said. The new-ish trainer not knowing the school horses particular quirks.
                      "Do what you can't do"

                      Comment


                      • #51
                        A dirty stop is when a horse stops in front of jump. I have never ever ever seen a school horse do what you said in a flat lesson. It is a red flag.

                        I would not be sending my daughter to a place that has a horse that does that. Something is wrong. Either the training has caused this or continuing to ride a horse in pain has caused this. THIS IS NOT NORMAL.

                        That said yes falls happen and kids bounce more than us adults do. You check the child is okay, if a fracture you take them straight to the hospital. If concussed straight to the hospital. If winded you wait until they can breathe If he pony does a 'dirty' stop, which it has never done before you change the pony, etc, etc, etc. That one is taken out of lessons until the problem has been addressed.

                        It is better to ride 5 minutes a day than it is to ride 35 minutes on a Sunday.

                        Comment


                        • #52
                          As a riding instructor and TR Instructor, I take real issue with the comment, "Unless you're dying or really knocked your head or need an ambulance, you get back on the horse." That kind of callous attitude about someone taking a fall can lead to riders being humiliated and leaving the sport or worse.

                          I once witnessed an instructor who had that attitude embarrass a middle aged woman who fell off at the canter. I was a volunteer in TR in a different lesson in the arena that time. I saw the fall and told the instructor I was working with that imho, they should call an ambulance immediately. They brushed me off, got the woman up, told her she was 'just fine' and her instructor wanted her to get back on. They made her sit in a chair and then, thankfully, she refused to get back on but they let her Drive Herself Home. Instead, she drove herself to the ER and it turned out she had a broken back.

                          I grew up on horses and had a horse farm for 22 years. I had some tough falls and my kids all fell off, too. I know it comes with the territory but as an instructor, I believe it is our responsibility to be up front and honest with parents about any type of fall. Sometimes it's ok to brush off the jeans and get back on, but if there is any question, I always err on the side of caution and always tell the parents. The barns I've taught in always required an incident report.

                          Comment


                          • #53
                            I came off eight times in a lesson once when I was a teen. I don't think my mom even knows now, ~16 years later. It was a green hony that really liked to bronc buck when you'd ask for canter. I don't really know why the trainer/coach never got on at any point, I never thought about it before.

                            Anyway, that was a long time ago. When I was riding as a teen, there was never any protocol about contacting parents. My mom didn't typically stay and watch my lessons, for a variety of reasons. No one made a special phone call if I fell off. I'm sure they would have if I had been injured, but I was fortunate to not have any real injuries other than scrapes and bruises. It definitely was a "hospital or on!" time, far more than it is now, and my mom only knew if I fell off when I had dirt all over me.

                            I think, with the increased knowledge about concussions these days, it isn't unreasonable to expect to lesson barns to start implementing some kind of notification and documenting procedure. That way, at the very least even if the kid seemed fine immediately after the fall, the parent(s) know to watch for possible concussion signs over the next few days, as we know they can take several days to surface.
                            Custom tack racks!
                            www.mmeqcenter.com/tacklove.html

                            Comment


                            • #54
                              Not related to trainers, but before we started riding lessons my Dad took us to the front lawn and taught us how to tuck our shoulder and roll in a fall, from the standing upright position.
                              Falls were expected. I think I was 6 or 8 years old.

                              Comment


                              • #55
                                Is it just me or is this thread veering into Troll Bingo country?
                                Details are now being added:

                                "not jumping, basic walk, trot, canter"

                                Then who provided the "Dirty Stop" tag for pony's behavior?
                                Not appropriate in the circumstance now described.

                                "newish trainer....tons of experience...not versed in this type of horse behavior."

                                Oxymoron.
                                New to teaching? What kind of experience?
                                That "horse behavior" should be a Stop.Do.Not.Pass.Go! for any horse suited for beginning riders, especially kids.

                                "every parent compliments her riding"

                                Every horse-knowledgeable parent?
                                If not, their opinions are not so valuable as you might like to believe.

                                As an aside:
                                Do trainers not teach Emergency Dismount any more?
                                We were taught beginning with horse standing still, progressed to walk, trot & finally canter.

                                I believe I may need to pop some corn.
                                And perhaps pour a glass of cardbordeaux.
                                *friend of bar.ka*RIP all my lovely boys, gone too soon:
                                Steppin' Out 1988-2004
                                Hey Vern! 1982-2009, Cash's Bay Threat 1994-2009
                                Sam(Jaybee Altair) 1994-2015

                                Comment


                                • #56
                                  2DogsFarm you could be on to something, but is there a square for that?

                                  Comment


                                  • #57
                                    It's impossible to say whether or not this is a usual/normal/safe situation without seeing exactly what happened.

                                    If your daughter was on a lesson pony who was dirty stopping and dropping a shoulder and she was coming off at high speeds... no it is not usual to be getting back on 3x. If she was slipping down the front of a pony who stopped to get a bite of grass, that's a little different.

                                    To answer your bigger question - No, equestrians do not consider falls to be a huge deal or worth a phone call to parents. Any instructor I've ever worked with (and it's a looong list) always expect their students to get back on unless there is an obvious injury or any hint of a head/back/neck injury. Getting back on with one of these injuries can be catastrophic. But most falls are not a big deal and most of the time it's a good idea to get back on.

                                    I've fallen off 20 - 30 times. Three times I did not get back on - two concussions from horses who I knew were going to buck me off again if I got back on and one obviously broken arm. I can think of two times I took a few minutes to decide if I was okay before getting back on. And the rest I fell off, knew I was okay, and I was back on the horse and back to business inside of three minutes. Some of those were forgotten by the end of the ride. This is just my personal experience, but it does give you at least one anecdotal account of how often falls are serious

                                    Comment

                                    • Original Poster

                                      #58
                                      Originally posted by 2DogsFarm View Post
                                      Is it just me or is this thread veering into Troll Bingo country?
                                      Details are now being added:

                                      "not jumping, basic walk, trot, canter"

                                      Then who provided the "Dirty Stop" tag for pony's behavior?
                                      Not appropriate in the circumstance now described.

                                      "newish trainer....tons of experience...not versed in this type of horse behavior."

                                      Oxymoron.
                                      New to teaching? What kind of experience?
                                      That "horse behavior" should be a Stop.Do.Not.Pass.Go! for any horse suited for beginning riders, especially kids.

                                      "every parent compliments her riding"

                                      Every horse-knowledgeable parent?
                                      If not, their opinions are not so valuable as you might like to believe.

                                      As an aside:
                                      Do trainers not teach Emergency Dismount any more?
                                      We were taught beginning with horse standing still, progressed to walk, trot & finally canter.

                                      I believe I may need to pop some corn.
                                      And perhaps pour a glass of cardbordeaux.
                                      Forgive me. I'm new to the horse world and also a somewhat traumatized parent who came here seeking some input. Some details didn't seem important at first post until questions were asked etc. I've tried to be honest and clear but maybe not successfully so...

                                      The "dirty stop" tag is what her trainer called what the pony was doing. I had no clue if is mainly used to refer to jumping behavior until people here said that. There were jumps in the ring but they were not doing the jumps rather going around and in between them.

                                      I probably talked up my girl more than I should but I've been surprised at horse knowledgeable parents saying "she's a good little rider" when I have no clue if she is average or ??

                                      The trainer is new to this barn but the leadership talked her up as having a lot of experience riding etc.

                                      ​​​​​​Glad my thread could be entertaining to you. Enjoy your popcorn.

                                      Comment


                                      • #59
                                        Originally posted by Denali6298 View Post
                                        2DogsFarm you could be on to something, but is there a square for that?
                                        Well, coulda been Less Than 5 Posts, but that ship sailed 2 pages ago.

                                        Maybe Accepts Unreasonable Risks
                                        Or
                                        Adds Details


                                        Aaannnddd....
                                        Now I smell Snark in OP's last response.
                                        Mea Maxima Culpa, but you kinda walking like a duck.
                                        *friend of bar.ka*RIP all my lovely boys, gone too soon:
                                        Steppin' Out 1988-2004
                                        Hey Vern! 1982-2009, Cash's Bay Threat 1994-2009
                                        Sam(Jaybee Altair) 1994-2015

                                        Comment


                                        • #60
                                          Originally posted by 2DogsFarm View Post

                                          Well, coulda been Less Than 5 Posts, but that ship sailed 2 pages ago.

                                          Maybe Accepts Unreasonable Risks
                                          Or
                                          Adds Details
                                          Good point

                                          Comment

                                          Working...
                                          X