Stallion Spotlight

Sandro Hit Standa Eylers

Real Estate Spotlight

Driveway
  • Welcome to the Chronicle Forums.
    Please complete your profile. The forums and the rest of www.chronofhorse.com has single sign-in, so your log in information for one will automatically work for the other. Disclaimer: The opinions expressed here are the views of the individual and do not necessarily reflect the views and opinions of The Chronicle of the Horse.

Announcement

Collapse

Forum rules and no-advertising policy

As a participant on this forum, it is your responsibility to know and follow our rules. Please read this message in its entirety.

Board Rules

1. You�re responsible for what you say.
As outlined in Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act, The Chronicle of the Horse and its affiliates, as well Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd., the developers of vBulletin, are not legally responsible for statements made in the Forums.

This is a public forum viewed by a wide spectrum of people, so please be mindful of what you say and who might be reading it�details of personal disputes may be better handled privately. While posters are legally responsible for their statements, the moderators may in their discretion remove or edit posts, though are not legally obligated to do so, regardless of content.

Users have the ability to modify or delete their own messages after posting. Moderators generally will not delete posts, threads or accounts unless they have been alerted and have determined that a post, thread or user has violated the Forums� policies. Moderators do not regularly independently monitor the Forums for such violations.

Profanity, outright vulgarity, blatant personal insults or otherwise inappropriate statements will not be tolerated and will be dealt with at the discretion of the moderators.

Users may provide their positive or negative experiences with or opinions of companies, products, individuals, etc.; however, accounts involving allegations of criminal behavior against named individuals or companies MUST be first-hand accounts and may NOT be made anonymously.

If a situation has been reported upon by a reputable news source or addressed by law enforcement or the legal system it is open for discussion, but if an individual wants to make their own claims of criminal behavior against a named party in the course of that discussion, they too must identify themselves by first and last name and the account must be first-person.

Criminal allegations that do not satisfy these requirements, when brought to our attention, may be removed pending satisfaction of these criteria, and we reserve the right to err on the side of caution when making these determinations.

Credible threats of suicide will be reported to the police along with identifying user information at our disposal, in addition to referring the user to suicide helpline resources such as 1-800-SUICIDE or 1-800-273-TALK.

2. Conversations in horse-related forums should be horse-related.
The forums are a wonderful source of information and support for members of the horse community. While it�s understandably tempting to share information or search for input on other topics upon which members might have a similar level of knowledge, members must maintain the focus on horses.

3. Keep conversations productive, on topic and civil.
Discussion and disagreement are inevitable and encouraged; personal insults, diatribes and sniping comments are unproductive and unacceptable. Whether a subject is light-hearted or serious, keep posts focused on the current topic and of general interest to other participants of that thread. Utilize the private message feature or personal email where appropriate to address side topics or personal issues not related to the topic at large.

4. No advertising in the discussion forums.
Posts in the discussion forums directly or indirectly advertising horses, jobs, items or services for sale or wanted will be removed at the discretion of the moderators. Use of the private messaging feature or email addresses obtained through users� profiles for unsolicited advertising is not permitted.

Company representatives may participate in discussions and answer questions about their products or services, or suggest their products on recent threads if they fulfill the criteria of a query. False "testimonials" provided by company affiliates posing as general consumers are not appropriate, and self-promotion of sales, ad campaigns, etc. through the discussion forums is not allowed.

Paid advertising is available on our classifieds site and through the purchase of banner ads. The tightly monitored Giveaways forum permits free listings of genuinely free horses and items available or wanted (on a limited basis). Items offered for trade are not allowed.

Advertising Policy Specifics
When in doubt of whether something you want to post constitutes advertising, please contact a moderator privately in advance for further clarification. Refer to the following points for general guidelines:

Horses � Only general discussion about the buying, leasing, selling and pricing of horses is permitted. If the post contains, or links to, the type of specific information typically found in a sales or wanted ad, and it�s related to a horse for sale, regardless of who�s selling it, it doesn�t belong in the discussion forums.

Stallions � Board members may ask for suggestions on breeding stallion recommendations. Stallion owners may reply to such queries by suggesting their own stallions, only if their horse fits the specific criteria of the original poster. Excessive promotion of a stallion by its owner or related parties is not permitted and will be addressed at the discretion of the moderators.

Services � Members may use the forums to ask for general recommendations of trainers, barns, shippers, farriers, etc., and other members may answer those requests by suggesting themselves or their company, if their services fulfill the specific criteria of the original post. Members may not solicit other members for business if it is not in response to a direct, genuine query.

Products � While members may ask for general opinions and suggestions on equipment, trailers, trucks, etc., they may not list the specific attributes for which they are in the market, as such posts serve as wanted ads.

Event Announcements � Members may post one notification of an upcoming event that may be of interest to fellow members, if the original poster does not benefit financially from the event. Such threads may not be �bumped� excessively. Premium members may post their own notices in the Event Announcements forum.

Charities/Rescues � Announcements for charitable or fundraising events can only be made for 501(c)(3) tax-exempt organizations. Special exceptions may be made, at the moderators� discretion and direction, for board-related events or fundraising activities in extraordinary circumstances.

Occasional posts regarding horses available for adoption through IRS-registered horse rescue or placement programs are permitted in the appropriate forums, but these threads may be limited at the discretion of the moderators. Individuals may not advertise or make announcements for horses in need of rescue, placement or adoption unless the horse is available through a recognized rescue or placement agency or government-run entity or the thread fits the criteria for and is located in the Giveaways forum.

5. Do not post copyrighted photographs unless you have purchased that photo and have permission to do so.

6. Respect other members.
As members are often passionate about their beliefs and intentions can easily be misinterpreted in this type of environment, try to explore or resolve the inevitable disagreements that arise in the course of threads calmly and rationally.

If you see a post that you feel violates the rules of the board, please click the �alert� button (exclamation point inside of a triangle) in the bottom left corner of the post, which will alert ONLY the moderators to the post in question. They will then take whatever action, or no action, as deemed appropriate for the situation at their discretion. Do not air grievances regarding other posters or the moderators in the discussion forums.

Please be advised that adding another user to your �Ignore� list via your User Control Panel can be a useful tactic, which blocks posts and private messages by members whose commentary you�d rather avoid reading.

7. We have the right to reproduce statements made in the forums.
The Chronicle of the Horse may copy, quote, link to or otherwise reproduce posts, or portions of posts, in print or online for advertising or editorial purposes, if attributed to their original authors, and by posting in this forum, you hereby grant to The Chronicle of the Horse a perpetual, non-exclusive license under copyright and other rights, to do so.

8. We reserve the right to enforce and amend the rules.
The moderators may delete, edit, move or close any post or thread at any time, or refrain from doing any of the foregoing, in their discretion, and may suspend or revoke a user�s membership privileges at any time to maintain adherence to the rules and the general spirit of the forum. These rules may be amended at any time to address the current needs of the board.

Please see our full Terms of Service and Privacy Policy for more information.

Thanks for being a part of the COTH forums!

(Revised 5/9/18)
See more
See less

Have you ever felt like quitting horses?

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #21
    This is pretty much the story of my history with horses so I had to comment. I got a free OTTB in college, rode him for a year before lameness issues started popping up. Made myself completely broke to pay for him and try to fix him and it didn't work. After 3 years of trying to rehab him I gave up. Leased a horse for a few months, went horse shopping with soundness at the top of my list. Bought a 7 year old QH and then spent 7 years with on and off lameness issues (make Lyme disease testing part of your pre-purchase) Then out of nowhere he injured his suspensory, I did full stall rest and rehab for a year and he was 100% sound and re-injured it in the field so I retired him. Moved him to a retirement farm and gave up. Sold everything I had that was horse related except for a small box of stuff and was DONE. Then about 6 months later I went with my friend to meet her foal and bought a yearling pretty much unplanned. Left him at the breeders for a bit then brought him to me at a low key farm and just had fun playing with him for a year and a half. Unfortunately he had some lameness issues but they were fixable and he just got back from being broke and is a dream to ride. He is the sanest 3yr old and exactly what I wanted. I had to take the time off from riding to grieve. It really is like riding a bike you can go back to it at anytime you just need to build up your muscles again. Just give yourself time and do whatever makes you happy in the moment. I needed a year and a half with zero expectations at the barn but still a horse to love and groom to get over my last 2 horses.

    Comment


    • #22
      Originally posted by candyappy View Post
      No , honestly I never have.

      I just like riding and I find it is different for those who need a "goal" to work for, achieve and progress beyond to keep riding . Horses aren't really their passion ( an interest yes) but more just a sport they chose to compete in.
      This is some real BS, candyappy. I've quit twice in my very long riding career, and I'm as passionate as anyone here. When you've been through the ringer financially, physically, and emotionally, you sometimes need to step away and recover for a minute. OP, don't even think the above statement is true. You wouldn't be struggling so hard with this decision if horses were just an "interest" for you. Please.

      Comment


      • #23
        I think most of us have. Horses aren't easy and they aren't a hobby you can lay down and then pick up whenever (I don't mean you can't quit and come back, I mean if you are involved you're involved, there's no not feeding, not providing care etc). Not to mention they are a major financial drain. But... every time I have thought about throwing in the towel, the next thought I have is well so and so has a horse I can ride and I could get training rides in etc and I know that I can't give it up. My goals have definitely changed over time- I used to be a H/J rider that slid over into dressage and eventing, but I've found my home and my tribe in endurance riding. It's okay for our goals to change and it's also okay to just get on and piddle about once a week or once a month. Sometimes I have to give myself a half-halt because I go into things full speed ahead- what is it I want to accomplish, what's the ideal? and am I on the right track to that? If you can't picture yourself without horses, figure out what you need to fix to make that happen. If you can, maybe a break is a good thing for you. Either way don't let anyone make you feel bad (including yourself) for wanting something different that what you have currently
        Wouldst thou like the taste of butter and pretty dress? Wouldst thou like to live deliciously?

        Comment


        • #24
          I just want to say I feel you, OP. It's hard.

          I have a talented, young, sound, beyond safe horse that I don't want to ride. He's everyone's dream - including what I thought my dream was. That makes the decision almost impossible because I know I will never have another like him.

          Sometimes it's just not your time. Horses will always be there. There's no harm in walking away. Millions of people live great lives without horses - all my friends do. There's a life out there for you.
          Originally posted by PeanutButterPony
          you can shackle your pony to a lawn chair at the show...so long as its in a conservative color.

          Comment


          • #25
            Originally posted by candyappy View Post
            No , honestly I never have.

            I just like riding and I find it is different for those who need a "goal" to work for, achieve and progress beyond to keep riding . Horses aren't really their passion ( an interest yes) but more just a sport they chose to compete in.

            Even as just a trail rider I sometimes just don't feel like riding some days, so I don't.
            I'm sorry, but that's just not true. When I was heavily involved in dressage, I was in it for love of the sport AND the horses. I don't slack off on care just because I'm not riding. Yes, there may be those for who this is 'just a sport' and you'll know them because they don't care for their own horses, they ride maybe once a week, a trainer soups up their $50,000 show horse for them, and then they go get the ribbons. That's not the majority of us. I have spent WAY more in time and money on my horses than many do, because I love them. I keep them into retirement because I love them. They're not throwaways.

            It is entirely possible to burn out on something you once loved, and never go back to it - but to say it's 'just a sport' is ridiculous and wrong. I hate trail riding. It's pointless and boring. Some of us A-type personalities NEED the challenge of progressing, training, working on issues, and pushing ourselves. You enjoy trail riding. So you do you. But don't lump us all of us who need the challenge of riding towards a goal in the same category.

            Comment


            • #26
              Oh, I have been in your shoes. I have taken a break and sold almost everything. I also lost almost everything in the 2009 housing turn when I was laid off. There is nothing wrong with letting it go. Make plans to join a gym maybe? Or something else to keep some time occupied. I ended up taking lessons twice a week completely not planned and loving the new direction I was going in. So if you feel the need find something popular locally and give it a try. Lessons are a no commitment deal.

              Comment


              • #27
                Originally posted by candyappy View Post
                I just like riding and I find it is different for those who need a "goal" to work for, achieve and progress beyond to keep riding . Horses aren't really their passion ( an interest yes) but more just a sport they chose to compete in.
                I have to disagree. I'm a goals-oriented person and horses are absolutely my passion. Those two things are not at all mutually exclusive.

                Comment


                • #28
                  Originally posted by CatPS View Post

                  Wow, that’s some pretty harsh judgement.

                  I have walked away from horses completely twice now. Both times it’s been a combination of losing my horse, financial strain, and changing life circumstances. Both times it was incredibly sad but also a relief. The best part is getting to go back to it when you’re ready, fresh and energized and a little bit wiser than before.
                  I wasn't judging anyone.

                  It is just what I have observed in people who ride mainly to compete or for the social aspect of riding over the last 43 years .

                  They may love horses but they have them and ride for different reasons. There is no right or wrong reason for having horses or for taking a break if you need to.


                  gertie06
                  Xanthoria
                  Alex and Bodie's Mom Your reasons for stepping away for a while from horses are unique to your circumstances. I was just commenting on the info the OP gave. I never said anything about the care you give your animals. Or your passion / commitment for horses.

                  Last edited by candyappy; Aug. 14, 2019, 03:58 PM.

                  Comment

                  • Original Poster

                    #29
                    Originally posted by candyappy View Post

                    I wasn't judging anyone.

                    It is just what I have observed in people who ride mainly to compete or for the social aspect of riding over the last 43 years .

                    They may love horses but they have them and ride for different reasons. There is no right or wrong reason for having horses or for taking a break if you need to.
                    I know candyappy was just going off what's in my OP which did mention my "goals" which yes, include competing. I also enjoy trail riding. I wouldn't say I ride "mainly" to compete and certainly not for the social aspect, lol. Most horse people are nuts.

                    If riding were simply an interest of mine, and not a passion, I wouldn't be struggling with my current situation. I would have given up a long time ago.

                    Comment


                    • #30
                      Riding has been my passion since I was 1 1/2 years old on my wonderhorrse. I was a pro for a period of time. And I *still* wonder quite frequently why the heck I’m still doing this and toyed with the idea of just quitting. I’ve walked away 3 times, sold/gave away the horses/sold the tack etc etc and not 6 months later have bought another horse and am back at it.

                      My husband now doesn’t even take me seriously when I say I should sell.

                      I’ve had health setbacks, horse issues, and most definitely trainer issues. I’ve thought about just going back to taking lessons (less stressful AND cheaper), trying another discipline (pretty sure I’ve almost tried them all at this point) or finding a trail suitable horse and just kicking back and wandering the property (mine is not trail suitable for me at present).

                      Part of the thread that ties it all together is a bit of discouragement that despite 30 years of riding, I’ll never achieve my goals. This body isn’t up to it any more, my brain isn’t up to it any more, and my wallet...it definitely doesn’t have it. But I know that if I don’t have a goal, I’ll flounder - it’s who I am as a person.

                      So, to make a long story short - I feel you OP. Take a break if you need to, don’t if you feel it won’t be useful, whatever, but whatever you do, give yourself permission to feel what you feel right now...You will sort this out and there should be no guilt nor shame about having any of these feelings. Many good thoughts coming your way.

                      Comment


                      • #31
                        Originally posted by CiegoStar View Post
                        Thanks everyone. You have all mentioned aspects of my thinking. Unfortunately my horse's health issues are serious and he may not even be pasture sound. It is still a work in progress. Sorry to be vague, but I have already spent so many hours trying to understand the problem, and gone to numerous vets for their (conflicting, hooray) advice. I'm exhausted.

                        This isn't even the first horse I've retired. I think that's really it. I have done this before. I know it's part of horses. When I ask myself, "Do you want to get another horse, knowing this could be the result, again?" the answer is no. I love horses but I hate this. I can't live with going through this again. At least that is how I feel right now. So I feel grief, really.

                        And then as others have mentioned, there's also the shady characters in the horse business. I guess I feel like I have seen it ALL and it's bad. The pure moments of happiness when it's just you and your horse, doing what you wanted to do together, i feel really far away from them.
                        Hugs to you.

                        And, this thread is making me cry, your second paragraph there, is kind of where I'm at right now, and it stinks. I feel like what is wrong with me that I seem to "attract" lame or not quite but maybe lame horses that require more maintenance than I ever knew existed. First few times, okay I chalked it up to "continuing education". But now? BTDT, and sick of it. And so is my bank account. Never mind that I had thorough vet checks and what all..... some things you can just not see coming.

                        And I grit my teeth and hang in there because I have worked so damn hard to be the rider/horsewoman I am, that walking away feels like such a waste.

                        My mind keeps going back to "when I did X,Y,Z I really enjoyed it" but reality is I am not a carefree late teens/early 20's anymore and those days are long gone. And so are those freedoms. So I try to find other ways to enjoy my horse life. Honestly I think the people factor in there doesn't help. I am a boarder too, so there will always be people that I think "gosh do we have to be at the barn at the same time".

                        Anyways that's not helpful to you I am sure....LOL.... but perhaps all of us sharing our stories and thoughts will make you feel less alone.

                        Comment


                        • #32
                          As many have written, I know exactly what you're going through. After 30 years of horses - owning, leasing, lessons, boarding, showing, injuries to both myself and the horses, drama, etc. - I stepped way, way back about three years ago. I sold my last horse in 2010 as we had to pay for my mother's Assisted Living care at $7500 per month until 2012. I then leased a lovely mare and rediscovered how freeing just leasing can be. You can still love the horse and care for them, but the huge commitment is off your shoulders. If and when big issues come up, it's a shared responsibility that you can even let go of if you have to. After several years of leasing we had to move across the country, so it was back to just lessons. That's where I'm at now and what a relief just lessons can be! But this is something I had to learn, become aware of and live through. No more "shoulds"; no more "but I'm wasting all that knowledge about riding so I have to show and I have to strive to be the Olympian I KNOW I was meant to be....". Yes, it can be difficult finding the right trainer, lesson horse and barn, but when I put my patience hat on, it can be interesting, fun and rewarding. I've gotten back so much time, money and have opened myself up to other passions and people. I did go up and down for a while about the whole thing emotionally, and yes, when I see a fine horse I STILL want to own it or at least lease it, but that too passes, and I'm glad when it does. You just CAN'T do everything and it's a joy to still be with and love horses but not have them rule your life. Best of luck to you.

                          Comment


                          • #33
                            I have definitely felt this way more than once in the past 15 years. I have only ever owned 4 horses and currently still own 3/4 (one passed away about 6 years ago). Currently, all three are in three different locations- 7 yr old in training, 17 yr old that is boarded and 9 yr old who is retired at DIL's farm due to bad stifle. So that is stressful. I don't see retired one very often, I ride/see the one in training once on the weekends and I ride the boarded one 2-3 times a week.

                            I feel like I bleed money and I know at times my husband is resentful of how much it costs, even though he does try to be supportive. That is stressful. I work as an insurance manager full time and commute so having all the horses scattered is hard- there is not enough money or time. I also had some issues with my 7 yr old after I moved barns in March and he got really spooky and I fell off a few times. I had to get him out of where he was and moved him to my trainer's 2 hours away. He can be sold there if I chose, but they are riding him and he is doing well and we are showing him so we will see where it goes. So now I go see him on the weekends and try to see my mom at the same time since she lives there.

                            Most of my issues due to 1) anxiety- fear of falling; 2) money- we are fine and I do not run short, but could i be involved and not spend as much?? I can never seem to find ways to save more only spend more; 3) time- I feel disorganized and overwhelmed sometimes by the various demands of horses scattered about. I can't do this long-term but am not ready to decide about the younger one's future yet. He is a *super* nice horse, but he is sensitive. He progressed very well and then he regressed when I moved him in March.

                            I have had the older horse that you can't ride too, and the heartache of putting him down- it's a lot of stress, time and money. My 9 yr old had to be retired so I also know about being disappointed and spending a lot of vet bills.

                            Perspective is everything though. We become bogged down when we think things will never change. They always change. There is impermanence to all of our situations, good or bad. Who's to say in 5 yrs you won't be the one talking about what bit to use and how to get ready for a show. Tables turn and things change. Deal with what you have now as you must. Decide your next step when it's time. And don't begrudge others who are in a different place in their journeys either. That is a sure way to make yourself, and only yourself. miserable

                            Comment


                            • #34
                              Horses are hard.

                              They break your heart, and your pocketbook, and sometimes your body.

                              But we get in so deep, so fast... sometimes it's almost impossible to step back from what we know we love, to evaluate if we're getting what we need from the pursuit.

                              Sunk costs- the cost of the horse, the equipment, the farm, the truck and trailer, the lifestyle adjustments- sometimes guilt us into keep doing something that we really need to change up... or even stop doing.

                              Much of this now has to do, I think, with how fast so many of us are aging out of horses. The tail end of the baby boomers have the time and money to ride many times, but our bodies hurt, our families move away and become more precious to us, our partners may be ill or die or choose someone new... what we think would be a simple time of life is often filled with big changes.

                              And horse stuff that was often a refuge, a carefree 'me' time out of our lives starts to have tinges of fear creep in. We begin to doubt our choices and confidence. We're asked to choose between people and horses, or we realize the money really isn't OK to spend on a horse that we promised to take care of forever. It gets emotionally complicated.

                              And if we're not aging out, then other life changes appear: school, work, kids, bills... sometimes I wonder how I ever found all the time it took in the past to pursue my horse dreams... and it was all so easy back in the day. Of course, my memory is not 100% now, so maybe those details are not quite as I remember them either.

                              My young life with horses was wonderful, and all my adult life I've tried different horse things to reclaim that feeling of fun, and adventure, and competence. I've found bits and pieces of it again, but often only after a significant break from, say, showing, or being in a training situation. I've downsized and recalibrated my dreams many times, and then approached horses after some kind of break from a new oblique angle, a different saddle, or a different horse sport.

                              And now I own a large boarding stable, and have realized, from watching the customers here, that you don't have to ride horses to have a satisfying relationship with them. I've been judgmental about horse breeds, sports, and pursuits for so long that it came as a shock when I realized that, for some, just having a horse to groom, to pet, to exercise and play with, was enough. No riding needed, no ribbons required to enjoy the process of going to the barn and doing your horse thing every day. There's a peace to be found at the barn that is not always based on the view from the back of a horse.

                              I can't imagine that any of us would willingly leave horses forever, but changing it up, taking a break, and coming back at the entire concept of 'horse' from a different viewpoint at another time has served me well, and has done the same for a lot of the women I watch outside my window at the barn. Most of us are lifers... but we play different games at different times in our horse life. That's OK.

                              It's hard to set aside feelings of guilt and judgmental thoughts about failure, being a lightweight, giving up, and other critical phrases if you also want to step away from this intensive horse game we play... but try to get some altitude on your life and the role horses should play in it, and you may find respite in changing up the intensity of your relationship with horses.

                              Comment


                              • #35
                                Originally posted by Miss Motivation View Post
                                Horses are hard.

                                They break your heart, and your pocketbook, and sometimes your body.

                                But we get in so deep, so fast... sometimes it's almost impossible to step back from what we know we love, to evaluate if we're getting what we need from the pursuit.

                                Sunk costs- the cost of the horse, the equipment, the farm, the truck and trailer, the lifestyle adjustments- sometimes guilt us into keep doing something that we really need to change up... or even stop doing.

                                Much of this now has to do, I think, with how fast so many of us are aging out of horses. The tail end of the baby boomers have the time and money to ride many times, but our bodies hurt, our families move away and become more precious to us, our partners may be ill or die or choose someone new... what we think would be a simple time of life is often filled with big changes.

                                And horse stuff that was often a refuge, a carefree 'me' time out of our lives starts to have tinges of fear creep in. We begin to doubt our choices and confidence. We're asked to choose between people and horses, or we realize the money really isn't OK to spend on a horse that we promised to take care of forever. It gets emotionally complicated.

                                And if we're not aging out, then other life changes appear: school, work, kids, bills... sometimes I wonder how I ever found all the time it took in the past to pursue my horse dreams... and it was all so easy back in the day. Of course, my memory is not 100% now, so maybe those details are not quite as I remember them either.

                                My young life with horses was wonderful, and all my adult life I've tried different horse things to reclaim that feeling of fun, and adventure, and competence. I've found bits and pieces of it again, but often only after a significant break from, say, showing, or being in a training situation. I've downsized and recalibrated my dreams many times, and then approached horses after some kind of break from a new oblique angle, a different saddle, or a different horse sport.

                                And now I own a large boarding stable, and have realized, from watching the customers here, that you don't have to ride horses to have a satisfying relationship with them. I've been judgmental about horse breeds, sports, and pursuits for so long that it came as a shock when I realized that, for some, just having a horse to groom, to pet, to exercise and play with, was enough. No riding needed, no ribbons required to enjoy the process of going to the barn and doing your horse thing every day. There's a peace to be found at the barn that is not always based on the view from the back of a horse.

                                I can't imagine that any of us would willingly leave horses forever, but changing it up, taking a break, and coming back at the entire concept of 'horse' from a different viewpoint at another time has served me well, and has done the same for a lot of the women I watch outside my window at the barn. Most of us are lifers... but we play different games at different times in our horse life. That's OK.

                                It's hard to set aside feelings of guilt and judgmental thoughts about failure, being a lightweight, giving up, and other critical phrases if you also want to step away from this intensive horse game we play... but try to get some altitude on your life and the role horses should play in it, and you may find respite in changing up the intensity of your relationship with horses.
                                This should be a published article!

                                Comment

                                Working...
                                X