Stallion Spotlight

Zucchero Gold - Wandres, Frederic - 838-BC18_REU2723-foto_reumann

Real Estate Spotlight

Copy of asbury aerial
  • Welcome to the Chronicle Forums.
    Please complete your profile. The forums and the rest of www.chronofhorse.com has single sign-in, so your log in information for one will automatically work for the other. Disclaimer: The opinions expressed here are the views of the individual and do not necessarily reflect the views and opinions of The Chronicle of the Horse.

Announcement

Collapse

Forum rules and no-advertising policy

As a participant on this forum, it is your responsibility to know and follow our rules. Please read this message in its entirety.

Board Rules

2. Conversations in horse-related forums should be horse-related.3. Keep conversations productive, on topic and civil.
Discussion and disagreement are inevitable and encouraged; personal insults, diatribes and sniping comments are unproductive and unacceptable. Whether a subject is light-hearted or serious, keep posts focused on the current topic and of general interest to other participants of that thread. Utilize the private message feature or personal email where appropriate to address side topics or personal issues not related to the topic at large.

4. No advertising in the discussion forums.classifieds site and through the purchase of banner ads. The tightly monitored Giveaways forum permits free listings of genuinely free horses and items available or wanted (on a limited basis). Items offered for trade are not allowed.

Advertising Policy Specifics
When in doubt of whether something you want to post constitutes advertising, please contact a moderator privately in advance for further clarification. Refer to the following points for general guidelines:

Board members may ask for suggestions on breeding stallion recommendations. Stallion owners may reply to such queries by suggesting their own stallions, only if their horse fits the specific criteria of the original poster. Excessive promotion of a stallion by its owner or related parties is not permitted and will be addressed at the discretion of the moderators.

Members may use the forums to ask for general recommendations of trainers, barns, shippers, farriers, etc., and other members may answer those requests by suggesting themselves or their company, if their services fulfill the specific criteria of the original post. Members may not solicit other members for business if it is not in response to a direct, genuine query.

While members may ask for general opinions and suggestions on equipment, trailers, trucks, etc., they may not list the specific attributes for which they are in the market, as such posts serve as wanted ads.

5. Do not post copyrighted photographs unless you have purchased that photo and have permission to do so.

6. Respect other members.7. We have the right to reproduce statements made in the forums.
The Chronicle of the Horse may copy, quote, link to or otherwise reproduce posts, or portions of posts, in print or online for advertising or editorial purposes, if attributed to their original authors, and by posting in this forum, you hereby grant to The Chronicle of the Horse a perpetual, non-exclusive license under copyright and other rights, to do so.

8. We reserve the right to enforce and amend the rules.Terms of Service and Privacy Policy for more information.

Thanks for being a part of the COTH forums!

(Revised 5/9/18)
See more
See less

dog type

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • I love my Australian Stumpy Tailed Cattle dog. He was a chewing monster when young but has matured into the ultimate companion animal. He is EXTREMELY loyal, is athletic enough to go running, but chill enough to enjoy being a couch potato at times as well. He comes to the barn, is good around horses cats and other dogs, friendly with strangers. Just overall easy to deal with and not much of a shedder, only catch is he is a wimp about the cold so appreciates wearing jackets in the winter...

    Comment


    • OP - I think something has to give inyour requirements....but I am glad you were honest enough to say that the dog would be out a lot in cold weather.
      Proud member of People Who Hate to Kill Wildlife clique

      Comment


      • OP, good luck finding the right dog. All breeds have something to offer and purebreds have the advantage of being relatively predictable in size and appearance. However, when it comes to temperament, keep in mind that there’s a lot of intra-breed variability. In my experience, two dogs of the same breed and even very closely related can be completely different in personality and trainability. A new pup will always be a bit of a crapshoot.

        The prevalence of cross-bred “designer” dogs is a such a divisive topic. I have a lot of sympathy for people who are dedicated to a specific breed, compete their dogs in conformation and performance shows, and who health test their breeding animals. I was such a person myself for many years. However, show breeders have a lot to answer for having created numerous breeds that are inherently unhealthy, e.g., extremely short faces, extremely long backs, extreme fragility, and just general maladaptive structures (consider the unfortunate bulldog). Please don’t argue that many purebreds are unhealthy due to “backyard” breeders. The maladaptive traits are purposely created and maintained since that is what the breed standard requires.

        The reason for the popularity of designer cross-breeds is simple: many of them are adorable and make lovely, healthy pets. I disagree with the notion that an F1 cross can never improve on the two purebred parents. Sometimes a cross is exactly what is likely to create a better pet. For example, toy poodles are cute and smart, but extremely fragile. They can break a leg jumping off the couch (this recently happen to a friend, an excellent show breeder). Many other small breeds are considerably more sturdy, but have squashed faces, leading to breathing difficulties and low exercise tolerance. A toy poodle crossed with numerous other small breeds will tend to yield a less extreme version of either purebred parent and hence a healthier, happier little animal. Crossing a standard poodle with other breeds will tend to produce animals that shed less than many purebreds, which is appealing to many people. Of course, crossing breeds will not eliminate health concerns (cancer susceptibility, hip dysplasia, etc.) that are prevalent in both breeds. But neither will breeding two purebred parents given that so many breeds are riddled with health problems that testing cannot eliminate.

        Comment


        • Originally posted by tja789 View Post
          OP, good luck finding the right dog. All breeds have something to offer and purebreds have the advantage of being relatively predictable in size and appearance. However, when it comes to temperament, keep in mind that there’s a lot of intra-breed variability. In my experience, two dogs of the same breed and even very closely related can be completely different in personality and trainability. A new pup will always be a bit of a crapshoot.

          The prevalence of cross-bred “designer” dogs is a such a divisive topic. I have a lot of sympathy for people who are dedicated to a specific breed, compete their dogs in conformation and performance shows, and who health test their breeding animals. I was such a person myself for many years. However, show breeders have a lot to answer for having created numerous breeds that are inherently unhealthy, e.g., extremely short faces, extremely long backs, extreme fragility, and just general maladaptive structures (consider the unfortunate bulldog). Please don’t argue that many purebreds are unhealthy due to “backyard” breeders. The maladaptive traits are purposely created and maintained since that is what the breed standard requires.

          The reason for the popularity of designer cross-breeds is simple: many of them are adorable and make lovely, healthy pets. I disagree with the notion that an F1 cross can never improve on the two purebred parents. Sometimes a cross is exactly what is likely to create a better pet. For example, toy poodles are cute and smart, but extremely fragile. They can break a leg jumping off the couch (this recently happen to a friend, an excellent show breeder). Many other small breeds are considerably more sturdy, but have squashed faces, leading to breathing difficulties and low exercise tolerance. A toy poodle crossed with numerous other small breeds will tend to yield a less extreme version of either purebred parent and hence a healthier, happier little animal. Crossing a standard poodle with other breeds will tend to produce animals that shed less than many purebreds, which is appealing to many people. Of course, crossing breeds will not eliminate health concerns (cancer susceptibility, hip dysplasia, etc.) that are prevalent in both breeds. But neither will breeding two purebred parents given that so many breeds are riddled with health problems that testing cannot eliminate.
          Fine, except assuming that a crossbred dog will not also inherit all that is bad, along with the good, carried by both breeds?

          Nope, the genes are there and any cross will not be any more or less apt to have the same problems in their offspring, problems of two breeds now.

          Scrambling more genes doesn't magically make them only pass the desirable ones, just provide more to pick from.

          Ask any vet that gets to treat all kinds of dogs about this.

          Comment


          • Originally posted by tja789 View Post
            However, show breeders have a lot to answer for having created numerous breeds that are inherently unhealthy, e.g., extremely short faces, extremely long backs, extreme fragility, and just general maladaptive structures (consider the unfortunate bulldog). Please don’t argue that many purebreds are unhealthy due to “backyard” breeders. The maladaptive traits are purposely created and maintained since that is what the breed standard requires.

            The reason for the popularity of designer cross-breeds is simple: many of them are adorable and make lovely, healthy pets. I disagree with the notion that an F1 cross can never improve on the two purebred parents. Sometimes a cross is exactly what is likely to create a better pet. For example, toy poodles are cute and smart, but extremely fragile. They can break a leg jumping off the couch (this recently happen to a friend, an excellent show breeder). Many other small breeds are considerably more sturdy, but have squashed faces, leading to breathing difficulties and low exercise tolerance. A toy poodle crossed with numerous other small breeds will tend to yield a less extreme version of either purebred parent and hence a healthier, happier little animal. Crossing a standard poodle with other breeds will tend to produce animals that shed less than many purebreds, which is appealing to many people. Of course, crossing breeds will not eliminate health concerns (cancer susceptibility, hip dysplasia, etc.) that are prevalent in both breeds. But neither will breeding two purebred parents given that so many breeds are riddled with health problems that testing cannot eliminate.
            It is true that some breeds have maladaptive traits. There are many that do not. I find this conversation weary because it almost always starts with "....but look at Bulldogs..." or "....GSDs look crippled!" There are 193 recognized breeds in AKC, which is not anywhere near the total number of breeds in the world.

            Your example of the toy poodle is a silly one. I don't think most people would consider toy poodles to be "extremely fragile", but sure, if they jump off of things it could result in injury. That is why I don't let my dogs jump off a grooming table. More likely than not, they won't get hurt - it's only 3' tall. But all dogs can hurt themselves doing seemingly normal things, especially jumping off of something.

            Regardless of your personal views about purebred dogs - crossbreeding is not necessarily any better. Most especially, because the majority of crossbreeders selling dogs for the pet market don't conduct even the most basic health tests - and not just testing the parents, but testing for generations. My breeding dogs have 5+ generations of clear hips, with multiple offspring from each breeding being tested. There are other tests done, but hips was one of the biggest issues in our breed and was one of the first to be routinely screened for. We all know that two normal parents might produce dysplastic puppies. It is less likely with multiple generations of passing hip evaluations though.

            Also, crossing a poodle with another breed *may* produce offspring that shed less than other breeds. Or not. There is absolutely no guarantee that the offspring will inherit the poodle coat instead of the golden or whatever other breed was chosen.

            Obviously if only offspring with the desirable coat were selected, and then bred to each other, for generations....that would increase the chances of the coat shedding less. Or, you could just get a poodle if you're actually seeking a breed that has been selectively chosen for a poodle coat over generations.




            Comment


            • I am right there with you. Searching for a new puppy since we lost 2 recently and have a couple very elderly dogs not long for this world. Been doing a lot of breed research as all my life I've had mostly shelter rescues but now I want something more specific. Am with you on some of the health issues. I wanted a Bernese Mountain Dog but was surprised how many health issues they have, so crossed them off the list.

              But I answer your post, I had a friend who bred Brittany Spaniels and they were mellow enough to be house dogs and loved being outside too and were very obedient, but the owner was invested as a person should be in training anything.

              I've dealt with a number of Afghans and while I like their slinky selves, they were pretty hyper and goofy until mature. Their coats take a lot of grooming too which I'm not a fan of. I can't stand Australian Shepherds. Had one kill one of my dogs and my boss has 2 mini's and they are the fight instigators at her place too, throwing fuel on dog disagreements (she has two other larger dogs at her place too). I'm not a fan of cattle-breeds anyway, too much attitude and drive for me, been there done that more than a few times, they are not my thing. Every one I've met is a little instigator and just cattle dog unpredictable personalities. Blue Heelers were biters. I loved a BC cross I had the best. GSD's as another breed are just a no for me. Too many personal horrible incidents with them both human and horse.

              We have a Schnauzer I rescued years ago and my parents had them for years too. Mine is mellow as were there dogs. Easy to train and easy to have in the home or outside and traveling. But again I am NOT into grooming so I'd not have another or anything that needs nearly daily combing. Mine I agreed to foster for someone until they came to get her and then they instead fell in love with some puppies and never came to pick her up and I felt bad returning her to the shelter so here she is 6 years later. Hubby clips her himself but neither one of us want another long coated dog to keep up with and chase hair around on those with thick under coats. Had a boss with Standard Poodles and like the Afghan's if you can get through the wiggly large silly puppy and adolescent stages and don't mind the grooming requirements both breeds were nice dogs. If not for the grooming I'd consider one of those breeds, though in my experience the Poodles were a little thicker in the head to train, but nice once they were mature.

              Comment


              • Originally posted by tja789 View Post
                However, show breeders have a lot to answer for having created numerous breeds that are inherently unhealthy, e.g., extremely short faces, extremely long backs, extreme fragility, and just general maladaptive structures (consider the unfortunate bulldog).
                I am also of the personal opinion that any blame for breeding purebreds that may "deviate" from what they originally looked like cannot be laid completely at the feed of the breeders.

                Breeders (whether it be dogs or horses or ?) will breed what pins in the show ring. Some of the "blame" needs to also be laid at the feet of the judges as well.
                Maybe the reason I love animals so much is because the only time they have broken my heart is when they've crossed that rainbow bridge

                Comment


                • Sure, there are extremes in the breed ring, but you have the ability to choose wisely. Nice to know that my pup's parents competed successfully not only in the breed ring but in agility and water work (PWDs), and stayed very sound. Pops just retired last year at 14 and still looks fantastic.

                  Comment

                  • Original Poster

                    I have been away over the weekend. Thank you for all the information!

                    Houndhill, you don't need to judge anything. I would just appreciate your experience with whatever breed you have.
                    If my SO wasn't ok with what I want I wouldn't be looking.
                    With more sub-zero days than above zero winter is a way of life for us,we simply put on another coat and go outside. I want a dog that can handle that.
                    All my dogs to date have been heavier coated and have not minded, indeed often have asked to stay out during the day.

                    I am currently doing research to learn about some different breeds. I am not familiar with foxhounds, that is why I am
                    doing research and not just going out and getting one.
                    Asking real people their actual experience with specific breeds is more useful than reading a generic breed description
                    on the internet.

                    The thing I know about the guardian breeds you mentioned, (because there are many sheep farmers here there are many types of guardian dogs and just about every imaginable x there could be) guardians are bred to be independent, loyal and protective. If kept fenced in they some can be great pets, but they are bred to cover distance, I often get a visit from a lovely Pyrenees which lives about 1.5 mile away. Some of the guardians are not welcoming to visitors, very aloof. I didn't specifically mention this in my op but we do get quite a few people dropping in for work and many people walking, riding, cycling past our yard.

                    It is amazing how small ones home gets when you have a 120lb dog on the floor. lol

                    My daughter has a purebred great dane, which is an in and out dog. She handles the winters just fine. (Sleeps inside!) I have considered getting one myself but SO doens't want such a big dog and frankly the gd is a bit too laid back for me. Same daughter also has a St. Bernard/Maremma cross. Lovely dog to decorate one's porch and kill coyotes, not interested in learning to shake a paw. Will not enter the house.

                    I do enjoy training, there is an agility club here in my area, I am prepared to spend the time a pup/young dog needs, each breed and individual will have different requirements.
                    If all puppy owners took a few classes I think there would be much happier pups and people. lol


                    I am interested in a shorter haired dog to see if I can find one compatible with my lifestyle. I would like the pooch to spend more time in the house with me because I like to spend time with her.
                    I am not stuck on a purebred but with a pb you have an idea of what you might get, with a mix there is not telling what part of the mix will prevail.
                    Too many times I have seen mixes fail with their owner because the prevailing instinct wasn't the one the owner hoped for.

                    Comment


                    • Sounds like any dog is going to be lucky to have you! Hope you're having as much fun in your search as I did and end up as happy with the result.

                      Comment


                      • Originally posted by colorfan View Post
                        I love the look of a Springer Spaniel, wondering if they are similar to a BC and need more stimulation than I can give.
                        Wondering about an English setter, have never known one personally
                        Ah! Was coming on here to suggest a setter I have a Gordon, and he is the perfect dog for me. He is very quiet and gentle, low energy compared to the terriers and shepherds I have had.

                        Trainability: Failed puppy kindergarten, but is a rockstar now! Slow to mature and not food motivated, praise motivated with a very short attention span. Super easy to crate train, never barked, very laid back, old soul.

                        Shedding: Mine is field bred, 1.5 years and doesn't shed yet. I don't think he has his full coat, so might shed when he does.

                        Energy level: Likes to go out in the field, but sleeps 98% of the day. Lays in the barn isle and stays out of trouble. Likes you to be in sight, but such an easy-going boy that if you tell him to stay, he'll plop himself down and wait.

                        Gordons vs Irish vs English: Gordons are supposed to be a little more stoic, hard-headed, and protective than the others. Irish and english, more like your drunk best friends I have really really loved the English I have met though.

                        Let me know if you have any other questions, i don't think I'll ever have anything else!

                        Comment


                        • Gordons are good but I'd never recommend any dog for outside living. I grew up with Llewellyn setters and they slept in my parents' bed every night. I've had 7 las rocosa Aussies plus one and more rescued off the road and kill shelter mixed breeds and all slept in my bed. Dogs and cats belong in the house at the table and in the bed.

                          Comment


                          • Of course there are no absolutes in animal breeding, it’s all a matter of probability and tendencies. If you cross a poodle with a squashed-nose breed, there will be a tendency for the offspring to have longer noses that the pure squashed-nose parent. There is a tendency, quite strong in fact, for poodle crosses to shed less than non-poodle breeds.

                            It’s too bad that “high quality” breeders automatically despise all cross breeding of dogs. It doesn’t have to be a terrible thing—the parents could still be health tested and selected for good temperaments. If fact, progress in breeding healthy, friendly, stable dogs would be facilitated if breeders focused on health and temperament instead of strict adherence to breed standards and what is defined as “show quality” at eight or ten weeks of age. In the dog world, one has to show in conformation or performance events or preferably both to be regarded as a “high-quality” breeder. So many pups are culled (sold as pets with mandatory spay/neuter contracts) because they have minute physical “flaws” that are imperceptible to the vast majority of people. Many dogs are bred over and over again because they won big in the show ring, despite having temperaments that are anything but family-friendly. Although show breeders say they care about temperament and many probably do, breeding for temperament generally takes a back seat to physical perfection. To add to the problem, physical perfection in many breeds is not compatible with life in most homes (e.g., extremely hard to care for coats, ears prone to infection, pathologically weak backs, etc.) Perhaps this is why the OP is having trouble deciding on a pleasant, trainable, not-too-much-shedding farm dog!

                            Wouldn’t it be beneficial, especially to dogs themselves, if knowledgeable breeders were more open to the probable benefits of cross-breeding dogs and contributed their knowledge to produce what the public actually wants in a family pet? I suspect that they feel threatened by the popularity of crosses. They should realize that the popularity reflects what I said previously: many of the crosses are adorable, sweet, less extreme in maladaptive structure, have reduced shedding, and are no less healthy than typical purebreds.


                            Comment


                            • There are so many dogs/breeds available. Too many people seem to be too stupid or too lazy to choose wisely which dog/breed is the right one. Breeding animals will always be a process and undergo changes, but educating people to me is the most important thing.

                              There is the dog waiting somewhere for everyone who is willing to do some research first and take care of the dog for an entire lifetime.

                              colorfan, sry for being more and more off-topic.

                              Comment


                              • Originally posted by tja789 View Post
                                It’s too bad that “high quality” breeders automatically despise all cross breeding of dogs. It doesn’t have to be a terrible thing—the parents could still be health tested and selected for good temperaments. If fact, progress in breeding healthy, friendly, stable dogs would be facilitated if breeders focused on health and temperament instead of strict adherence to breed standards and what is defined as “show quality” at eight or ten weeks of age.
                                What breed(s) did you own/show? You are making some amazingly broad statements about purebred breeding. Lots of very well-bred puppies in my breed are sold as family pets, hunting companions, or non-hunting performance dogs. Even those with conformation backgrounds. The best 1 or 2 might be sold into show homes, but not all of them.

                                The reason purebred people despise cross breeding - is because 95% of the cross breeding is not purposeful unless you consider making money a purpose; 3-4% is to cheat, and maybe 1% is actual purpose-bred breeding programs.

                                I think you'd probably find that of the 95% that are selling to the pet market - they are NOT health testing. That is a primary reason to despise them. And crossing random mixes together (like my co-worker's Pomsky -- a Pomeranian x Husky. ) And then selling them for $1000+++ to people with no guarantees, not willing to take them back, and often, not even screening the buyers to see if they are remotely capable of handling the dog.

                                Do you actually know any good cross-breeders? Honestly. I would be curious to know.

                                Comment


                                • Originally posted by S1969 View Post

                                  What breed(s) did you own/show? You are making some amazingly broad statements about purebred breeding. Lots of very well-bred puppies in my breed are sold as family pets, hunting companions, or non-hunting performance dogs. Even those with conformation backgrounds. The best 1 or 2 might be sold into show homes, but not all of them.

                                  The reason purebred people despise cross breeding - is because 95% of the cross breeding is not purposeful unless you consider making money a purpose; 3-4% is to cheat, and maybe 1% is actual purpose-bred breeding programs.

                                  I think you'd probably find that of the 95% that are selling to the pet market - they are NOT health testing. That is a primary reason to despise them. And crossing random mixes together (like my co-worker's Pomsky -- a Pomeranian x Husky. ) And then selling them for $1000+++ to people with no guarantees, not willing to take them back, and often, not even screening the buyers to see if they are remotely capable of handling the dog.

                                  Do you actually know any good cross-breeders? Honestly. I would be curious to know.
                                  I don’t personally know any good cross-breeders. A friend purchased her much-loved golden-doodle from this breeder who health tests and charges accordingly http://www.lakeviewdoodles.com. I get that this kennel appears to be a money-making endeavor for the family, but I would not regard this as inherently evil.

                                  The thing is, everyone is selling mainly to the pet market. The vast majority of people have no interest in conformation showing or hunting with dogs or any of the other niche dog sports, regardless of how well-bred their dog may be. So almost all dogs bred in this country are destined for pet homes. Those you regard as high quality breeders are indeed purpose breeding, but to what purpose? In their zeal to breed dogs with excessive coats and extreme body types or dogs that are driven to hunt, dig, herd, or otherwise perform they are creating animals that don’t make appropriate pets for most people. In any case, such “superior” breeders are small in number and could not possibly supply the demand for pet dogs in this country.

                                  I actually love the world of purebred dogs, despite recognizing some serious problems with the business. I have grown to appreciate cross-bred dogs too because I have become acquainted with so many nice ones. I don’t think that they or the people breeding them deserve the knee-jerk hostility that always comes from pure breed fanatics.

                                  Comment


                                  • Originally posted by T&G0913 View Post
                                    He is very quiet and gentle, low energy compared to the terriers and shepherds I have had.
                                    First off, I do believe there is a right dog and breed for every person and it isn't the same breed or individual

                                    Having said that, you obviously never lived with either of my two Border Terriers Incredibly laid back. Their ideal day is napping in my lap I would agree that terriers can be high energy but not all terriers or all terrier breeds (FWIW, I was vacillating between Border and Cairn and asked a friend of mine what she'd recommend given my personal requirements (seeing as how she had both). Took her no time at all to recommend the Border and I've been more than happy with both of mine (other than the Border Terrier bark in my ear when I'm putting on his harness for a walk ).
                                    Maybe the reason I love animals so much is because the only time they have broken my heart is when they've crossed that rainbow bridge

                                    Comment


                                    • Originally posted by tja789 View Post

                                      I don’t personally know any good cross-breeders. A friend purchased her much-loved golden-doodle from this breeder who health tests and charges accordingly http://www.lakeviewdoodles.com. I get that this kennel appears to be a money-making endeavor for the family, but I would not regard this as inherently evil.

                                      The thing is, everyone is selling mainly to the pet market. The vast majority of people have no interest in conformation showing or hunting with dogs or any of the other niche dog sports, regardless of how well-bred their dog may be. So almost all dogs bred in this country are destined for pet homes. Those you regard as high quality breeders are indeed purpose breeding, but to what purpose? In their zeal to breed dogs with excessive coats and extreme body types or dogs that are driven to hunt, dig, herd, or otherwise perform they are creating animals that don’t make appropriate pets for most people. In any case, such “superior” breeders are small in number and could not possibly supply the demand for pet dogs in this country.

                                      I actually love the world of purebred dogs, despite recognizing some serious problems with the business. I have grown to appreciate cross-bred dogs too because I have become acquainted with so many nice ones. I don’t think that they or the people breeding them deserve the knee-jerk hostility that always comes from pure breed fanatics.
                                      I would hardly call this a good breeder. Sorry. They have 4 current litters and 5 coming just this summer. This is a puppy mill.

                                      They breed:
                                      English Petite/Mini Goldendoodles
                                      English Miniature/Sm. Standard Goldendoodles
                                      English Petite Goldendoodles
                                      English Miniature Goldendoodles
                                      English Miniature Multigen Goldendoodles
                                      English Petite Multigen Goldendoodles
                                      English Multigen Double Doodles
                                      English Petite/Mini Multigen Goldendoodles

                                      They use "guardian homes" so they can place their breeding bitches somewhere else and just use them when they want.

                                      Not sure I believe their health testing claims. They are presenting dogs as "Vonwillabrands Clear" when it is actually "Von Willebrand." And as far as I know, not known to affect poodles or goldens.

                                      And "Lakeview Max" hybrid male born in 2016 is listed in the OFA database with only a patella exam. Not any of the other things listed by his name (OFA Hip Certified "Excellent", Penn Hip Above Average, Elbows Normal/Petellas, Vonwillabrands Clear, Heart CERF Clear/Normal, Eye CERF Clear/Normal
                                      Eye PRA Clear.) I suppose it is possible it's not the same dog.....

                                      Most breeders don't do Penn Hip and OFA either, and Penn Hip is grade by distraction index (a number) - not "above average" or any other qualitative score. No entry for Rudder, no entry for Tye Braxton - which should come up since it's unusual. Heart exams are not called CERF (CERF stood for Canine Eye Registration Foundation, but OFA does the eye certifications now).

                                      I'd like to see the certificates as proof. I don't believe them.
                                      Last edited by S1969; May. 27, 2019, 06:12 PM.

                                      Comment


                                      • Originally posted by colorfan View Post
                                        I have been away over the weekend. Thank you for all the information!

                                        Houndhill, you don't need to judge anything. I would just appreciate your experience with whatever breed you have.
                                        If my SO wasn't ok with what I want I wouldn't be looking.
                                        With more sub-zero days than above zero winter is a way of life for us,we simply put on another coat and go outside. I want a dog that can handle that.
                                        All my dogs to date have been heavier coated and have not minded, indeed often have asked to stay out during the day.

                                        I am currently doing research to learn about some different breeds. I am not familiar with foxhounds, that is why I am
                                        doing research and not just going out and getting one.
                                        Asking real people their actual experience with specific breeds is more useful than reading a generic breed description
                                        on the internet.

                                        The thing I know about the guardian breeds you mentioned, (because there are many sheep farmers here there are many types of guardian dogs and just about every imaginable x there could be) guardians are bred to be independent, loyal and protective. If kept fenced in they some can be great pets, but they are bred to cover distance, I often get a visit from a lovely Pyrenees which lives about 1.5 mile away. Some of the guardians are not welcoming to visitors, very aloof. I didn't specifically mention this in my op but we do get quite a few people dropping in for work and many people walking, riding, cycling past our yard.

                                        It is amazing how small ones home gets when you have a 120lb dog on the floor. lol

                                        My daughter has a purebred great dane, which is an in and out dog. She handles the winters just fine. (Sleeps inside!) I have considered getting one myself but SO doens't want such a big dog and frankly the gd is a bit too laid back for me. Same daughter also has a St. Bernard/Maremma cross. Lovely dog to decorate one's porch and kill coyotes, not interested in learning to shake a paw. Will not enter the house.

                                        I do enjoy training, there is an agility club here in my area, I am prepared to spend the time a pup/young dog needs, each breed and individual will have different requirements.
                                        If all puppy owners took a few classes I think there would be much happier pups and people. lol


                                        I am interested in a shorter haired dog to see if I can find one compatible with my lifestyle. I would like the pooch to spend more time in the house with me because I like to spend time with her.
                                        I am not stuck on a purebred but with a pb you have an idea of what you might get, with a mix there is not telling what part of the mix will prevail.
                                        Too many times I have seen mixes fail with their owner because the prevailing instinct wasn't the one the owner hoped for.
                                        OP I am sorry you felt “judged” by me, I was simply trying to clarify your criteria for a dog, since you stated your SO wanted a 100% outdoor dog, without noting you were disregarding his preference. That is why I suggested a rough-coated livestock guardian breed, some of those can live 100% outdoors in frigid climates, as can the Northern breeds of course. A short haired single coated breed is not going to tolerate the cold as well.

                                        Now we learn your SO is opposed to a breed over 120 pounds, which you do seem to view as a reasonable requirement. You also now state you want to do Agility.

                                        It is difficult to keep up with your requirements and which ones your SO may be consulted with and which his wishes are disregarded. I do not think you would care to train a retired pack foxhound in Agility. It can be done, of course, but it would take a great deal of work and effort which I am not convinced you would be committed to, since you stated in your OP you would not be willing to undertake training a Beagle puppy - generally a much easier task.

                                        We now have the added requirement of being tolerant or friendly to people who walk, cycle, or ride past her property, so does not want a guardian breed, as well as being responsive enough to be taught to shake hands, and must be livelier as well as smaller than a Dane. And should be short- coated, yet able to tolerate regular exposure to sub-zero temperatures.

                                        This is why most reputable breeders want to meet with both members of a couple, and the entire family, before committing to allow them to have a puppy of their breeding. You must, as a breeder, make sure they are on the same page.

                                        Please keep us posted on what breed or mix you decide is right for you and, presumably, your SO.
                                        Last edited by Houndhill; May. 27, 2019, 08:00 PM.

                                        Comment


                                        • Originally posted by S1969 View Post

                                          I would hardly call this a good breeder. Sorry. They have 4 current litters and 5 coming just this summer. This is a puppy mill.

                                          They breed:
                                          English Petite/Mini Goldendoodles
                                          English Miniature/Sm. Standard Goldendoodles
                                          English Petite Goldendoodles
                                          English Miniature Goldendoodles
                                          English Miniature Multigen Goldendoodles
                                          English Petite Multigen Goldendoodles
                                          English Multigen Double Doodles
                                          English Petite/Mini Multigen Goldendoodles

                                          They use "guardian homes" so they can place their breeding bitches somewhere else and just use them when they want.

                                          Not sure I believe their health testing claims. They are presenting dogs as "Vonwillabrands Clear" when it is actually "Von Willebrand." And as far as I know, not known to affect poodles or goldens.

                                          And "Lakeview Max" hybrid male born in 2016 is listed in the OFA database with only a patella exam. Not any of the other things listed by his name (OFA Hip Certified "Excellent", Penn Hip Above Average, Elbows Normal/Petellas, Vonwillabrands Clear, Heart CERF Clear/Normal, Eye CERF Clear/Normal
                                          Eye PRA Clear.) I suppose it is possible it's not the same dog.....

                                          Most breeders don't do Penn Hip and OFA either, and Penn Hip is grade by distraction index (a number) - not "above average" or any other qualitative score. No entry for Rudder, no entry for Tye Braxton - which should come up since it's unusual. Heart exams are not called CERF (CERF stood for Canine Eye Registration Foundation, but OFA does the eye certifications now).

                                          I'd like to see the certificates as proof. I don't believe them.

                                          I didn’t say that they were a good breeder, just that my friend acquired a nice dog from them and they state that they do health tests. I do not know if the information on the website is truthful or not. What is true is that relatively few dogs born in the US, whether pure or cross bred, come from parents who were extensively health tested. This is just not the norm. Paradoxically, high quality show breeders tend to take pride in producing few litters, often breeding only one litter a year or less. Anyone who breeds a lot of litters is automatically declared to be a puppy mill and shamed online (as you immediately did). Given this mindset, there’s no way high quality breeders will supply all of the puppies that people are seeking to buy. Just a fact.

                                          There are many ways to acquire the right dog. Purchasing from a high quality breeder is a fine way, and people should be willing to spend more for pups from health-tested parents. Loyal, beloved companions are also acquired from backyard/family breeders of purebreds or crossbreds, rescues, the local pound, or Craigslist. All of the latter are not unhealthy trash dogs as some people choose to believe. I wish the OP the best of luck in acquiring the right dog for her circumstances.

                                          Comment

                                          Working...
                                          X