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  • #81
    At the medical clinic I attend they have Bella - she is the most exquisite pure white standard poodle I have ever had the pleasure to meet. Not for the OP, but I just had to sing the praises of Bella as a therapy dog. Her owner has her so groomed for the days she comes to work. She's gentle, polite and obedient. I'd take her home in a minute --- but who can compete for facial expressions than Pebbles, our Boxer?
    Proud member of People Who Hate to Kill Wildlife clique

    Comment


    • #82
      I think re-homing a retired greyhound or fox hound is a super idea. I'm just curious about the fox hounds, if you live on a large farm with lots of wild life, do they take off after deer or rabbits or other critters? My only experience with fox hounds is actually being on a hunt with them.

      As for the Bernese Mountain Dog, I did live with a family on a large farm in Switzerland that had one. He was a very agreeable dog, just happy to be around, help round up the dairy cows, go on walks, play soccer with the children, etc. He wasn't allowed in the house, which at 19 was unfamiliar to me. He was a working farm dog, the first I'd known, and he protected the farm's smaller inhabitants - rabbits, guinea fowl, chickens, turkeys, ponies, etc. He was a very friendly and a very happy go lucky dog. He loved his job. But he had a LOT of hair! I never understood how he kept cool out bailing hay in 90° weather. Shedding I can't comment on, since he wasn't allowed in the house.
      ~~ How do you catch a loose horse? Make a noise like a carrot! - British Cavalry joke ~~

      Comment


      • #83
        Originally posted by 4LeafCloverFarm View Post
        I think re-homing a retired greyhound or fox hound is a super idea. I'm just curious about the fox hounds, if you live on a large farm with lots of wild life, do they take off after deer or rabbits or other critters? My only experience with fox hounds is actually being on a hunt with them.
        Well. Mine was retired because he was not really into the hunting aspect of the sport (we starting hunting the same year and he seemed to have chosen me as his person from day 1--used to hang out at my stirrup in the field instead of doing his job), so that is not a problem I have. (That said, he HAS opened on a fox that we bumped into in the back yard...) I confess I was worried about him with my cats at first, but he barely even notices them and shows no interest in chasing when he does.

        Most packs are deer broke by the huntsman (it's bad when they chase deer!) and are trained to the specific scents that are fair game in their hunt (fox, coyote...sometimes bear, bobcat, etc). My hound spends a lot of time with his nose to the ground outside (as they are wont) but hasn't ever taken off after anything--see above about how that dog don't hunt.

        There are hounds in our pack that I'm sure would make better pets than others in terms of hunting drive and personality alike, but typically hunts work hard to match hound and new owner well. We want the pairing to be successful and happy so that our hounds get a good retirement after their service to the hunt.

        If you're interested in adopting a retiring hound but don't know where to start, I can probably figure out who you should talk to at your local hunt. I'm passionate about this and am happy to help if I can.

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        • Original Poster

          #84
          Originally posted by S1969 View Post

          Interesting website; as with all things like this I would take it as a baseline and then talk to people in the breed. It mentions "can be overly submissive" and "can be prone submissive urination" in the traits for a Brittany and I have to say I've never known any that have done this - and I know a lot of them because I'm active in the breed at the regional and national level.

          I agree that they are a "softer" dog than some other pointing breeds (e.g. GSP) and that could be why it is in there - if you train a Brittany like a Shorthair you may have problems. They definitely require a softer touch.

          I've known way more overexuberant greeter of strangers than submissive dogs. I can't really even think of any I would call submissive. A few are more reserved than others. Mine are definitely in the "overexuberant" category.
          This is exactly why I have come here, to get real peoples real experiences!
          And I appreciate everyone who has responded.

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          • Original Poster

            #85
            ecileh, several people on this thread as well as a friend of mine have recommened a foxhound to me. You could poke around and see where the nearest hunt club is to me but I think the distance will prove prohibitive. I might be surprised.

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            • Original Poster

              #86
              There are several Bernese Mountain Dogs and multiple crosses in my area. Some as house dogs, some as working dogs. They are attractive but just don't appeal to me.

              Comment


              • #87
                When I've gone horse shopping I start out with an idea and then one horse speaks to me and I come home with it -
                same as with dogs - the dog that picks you may be vastly different to the one you thought you might choose. I say go with your heart.
                Proud member of People Who Hate to Kill Wildlife clique

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                • #88
                  Originally posted by colorfan View Post
                  ecileh, several people on this thread as well as a friend of mine have recommened a foxhound to me. You could poke around and see where the nearest hunt club is to me but I think the distance will prove prohibitive. I might be surprised.
                  Will do. PM-ed you for your location.

                  Comment

                  • Original Poster

                    #89
                    Brittany's are beautiful and with the good reports on them might be what I am looking for. Not sure how to find one other than kijiji.

                    Comment


                    • #90
                      Originally posted by tbchick84 View Post
                      What about a Goldendoodle? While I'm not at all a fan of hybrids, you would get the lovely personality of a Golden without all the hair since poodles do not shed. Both would be fine with winters and make great couch potatoes when inside.
                      All an absolute myth. Lots and lots of Goldendoodles shed like mad. You don't magically get the non shed side of poodle when you cross a poodle with a shedding machine. The overwhelming majority I, the other veterinarians I know and the groomers I know meet are hyperactive nut jobs. And prone to major allergy issues.

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                      • #91
                        Not sure why the comments that certain breeds can't live out all the time since I read your initial post as having the dog in and out - wherever you are. If that's true, putting in a serious recommendation for the Portuguese Water Dog if you don't mind grooming (minimized if you clip them short, like a poodle puppy clip). Mine is hysterical - ok, you do need a sense of humor - and happy all the time. The one thing she finds very hard is being away from me, and sounds like your dog will have plenty of time with you. I will say she's very mouthy (understandable, given the breed's history) and exuberant, but she's good at chilling where it's established that that's what we do (my office, for example). And you can't beat a portie for cuteness.

                        My only beagle comment would be that the phrase "beagle earmuffs" was created for a reason. hahahahaha.

                        Comment


                        • #92
                          Serious question, but why the flack for living outside?

                          My recollections of serious breeders, back in the day, of Northern Type dogs, all had big chain-linked fenced enclosures with brick kennels, much like a barn with stalls and separate runs for horses.

                          Fox hunting kennels are the same are they not? Those hounds dont live inside. Same for working sled dogs up north.

                          Comment


                          • #93
                            Originally posted by colorfan View Post
                            Brittany's are beautiful and with the good reports on them might be what I am looking for. Not sure how to find one other than kijiji.
                            I could help you get in touch with breeders if you are looking for a breeder. There are Also a couple of breed rescue organizations.

                            I can send you a PM later. In the meantime I'll share a pic of one of my boys. ☺ hard to resist these guys..
                            Attached Files

                            Comment


                            • #94
                              I'll see you a Brittany (adorable) and raise you a Portie... hehehe

                              Comment


                              • #95
                                Originally posted by mithril View Post
                                I've been fortunate to have lived with and met many breeds over the years and currently am loved by a Standard Poodle, a Standard Poodle/German Shorthaired Pointer, and an Irish Red and White Setter (she is my second).

                                My Poodle (from a reputable breeder) is 2 now and I am head over heels in love with the breed. By far the best breed that I've ever owned. Bloat is very much a concern, but it seems like there are plenty of people who haven't experienced it as often as other people, so I try not to worry about it. Seems like it's a crapshoot and not always a sure thing that your dog will be affected by it, but good to be aware and try to minimize the potential (e.g. no exercise before/after eating). That being said, I have not encountered it personally, and I can understand how one would want to avoid it entirely by not being involved with the breed. Regarding her hair; I keep her in a close cut and do it myself at home. It is done infrequently enough that I don't feel as though it's an inconvenience (and I lead an insanely busy life lol).

                                The Setter has slowed down with age, but she is still extremely high energy. Although the parents were health-tested, some of her siblings developed crippling hip dysplasia at an early age. She's smart in her own way, but not "traditionally" so like a Border Collie or Poodle.
                                I love Standard Poodles and currently have my 3rd and 4th Standard Poodle girls and do all kinds of performance things with them, primarily agility, but we also have obedience, rally, barn hunt and trick titles. Bloat is indeed a concern with them, as it is in a number of other large deep-chested breeds, and I lost my first one to GDV many, many years ago. However, all breeds have their health issues and anyone considering a breed should be doing a thorough investigation on them, at the very least so they can know what health testing to ask breeders about when looking for a puppy. Both of my dogs had a prophylactic gastropexy when they were spayed (my first one did not, it was not something really done at that time). I don't spay until after a heat for various reasons and then wait several months after. My girls typically come into their first heat around 16 months or so, by the time they are spayed they are close to 2. I would not want to do a pexy on an immature dog whose stomach was not fully grown. While a pexied dog can still bloat, which is still a medical emergency requiring immediate veterinary care, they should not torsion and will hopefully ensure a more favorable outcome. I groomed professionally at one time and do all my own grooming on my girls, but there is no need to keep them in a fancy cut if you don't want the coat care, brush work, etc. and mostly anyone can learn to do and keep a short basic cut with a clipper which would not require a lot of scissor work.

                                Also keep in mind, while some breeds tend to be more energetic, there are almost always a range of temperaments in a litter. My breeder picks pups for people based on their needs, the temperament testing she does, etc. I always get a high drive, very active puppy because of all the training and showing I do. But there are always puppies that are less driven with more low key temperaments.....

                                Comment


                                • #96
                                  Originally posted by Chall View Post
                                  Serious question, but why the flack for living outside?

                                  My recollections of serious breeders, back in the day, of Northern Type dogs, all had big chain-linked fenced enclosures with brick kennels, much like a barn with stalls and separate runs for horses.

                                  Fox hunting kennels are the same are they not? Those hounds dont live inside. Same for working sled dogs up north.
                                  Kennels vary from hunt to hunt, but they typically have a means for the hounds to get inside at night/during bad weather/when they need shade, etc.

                                  Ours has slider doors that open from smallish stall-like areas out into the yard. In good weather, these are open so the hounds can come and go as they please; in bad weather they are closed with the hounds inside.

                                  Comment


                                  • #97
                                    ^ Thank you, ecileh. That was what I thought, but wasn't sure of.

                                    Comment


                                    • #98
                                      Remember OPs sig other was opposed to a dog in the house at all.

                                      Hounds as a pack can do very well in unheated kennels.

                                      One hound alone in a very cold climate may be more problematic especially in -30 temps. Really big difference- hounds in a pack can huddle together for warmth, like puppies in a litter. One hound alone cannot, though if provided with suitable shelter and bedding can do fine in unheated quarters to a certain degree. I would not keep one dog of any short- haired breed in an unheated kennel in -30 temps.

                                      Also not sure OP really understands hound temperament vs sporting herding and working breeds.
                                      Last edited by Houndhill; May. 24, 2019, 07:43 PM.

                                      Comment


                                      • #99
                                        Originally posted by Houndhill View Post
                                        Remember OPs sig other was opposed to a dog in the house at all.
                                        I read this as "if given his own way, he would prefer an outside dog" but that the OP was ok with dogs in the house. So she was looking to consider a somewhat less hairy compromise.

                                        As for temperament, though, I agree. Hounds and sporting dogs are really different. As my friend with the little Beagle found out. Luckily he's little and looks like a perpetual puppy, so he's still amazingly cute and hard not to forgive. He is trainable, and she does rally with him, but compared to a sporting breed it has been considerably more difficult. Hard to housetrain as well. He wore belly bands for about a year.

                                        Comment


                                        • I guess we need a bit of clarification from OP.

                                          Here is what she wrote:
                                          Original Poster
                                          #22
                                          May. 21, 2019, 04:46 PM
                                          Thank you, great responses, just what I was looking for.
                                          Chall, you are right, I do prefer a dog focused on her human.

                                          1969, yes the breeds are all over, I am sight oriented myself, I like the look of the dogs I mentioned. Knowing I am sight oriented I decided to do research which involved real people and their experience.
                                          guess Afhgans are out....my area loaded with deer..
                                          My area gets -30 in winter, or more. All the dogs I mentioned live outside 100% of the time here, (with the exception of the Afgan-I don't know about her)

                                          What I did with my Collie and would do with the next dog is they are out when I am out and in when I am in, unless they ask to stay out, which my collie often did.(not at night)
                                          She was never left outside unsupervised until her third summer. ( we live on a large acrage)

                                          I can handle a vacuum so don't mind shedding so much but shedding is a pretty big deal to my SO, he would prefer a 100% outside dog.


                                          So until we actually know whether we are looking for 100% outdoor as the spouse would prefer, or in & out as OP would prefer it is hard to know what to advise.

                                          But OP definitely is very ill suited for an Afghan and probably all hounds. A greyhound would definitely die if kept permanently outside at -30. I udon’t think OP understands the similarity between beagles- which she has said she would never consider- and foxhounds. I love both breeds, and have known plenty of foxhounds who are escape artists and who live to hunt, even when retired. I am a hunter member and quite experienced with both breeds as well as an AKC judge. I am a breeder/owner/exhibitor/handler of my breed since the earth settled.

                                          Maybe a nice thick coated mix from the animal shelter would be appropriate, or something with a thick coat from livestock guardian breeds or Northern breeds if OP really wants to keep it exclusively outdoors in -30 temps. I’m sure they would do really well under those conditions.

                                          OP if you want your dog-keeping conditions to prevail you need to clarify that and perhaps remove reference to your SO preferences- otherwise how are we to determine whose views will prevail?

                                          Most reputable breeders and rescues require a meeting of all who live under the same roof to obtain a consensus about what the expectations are about an additional family member, and what the expectations are as far as who is living and sleeping where.

                                          You can certainly bypass this level of inquiry by acquiring your dog through some other means, which you have mentioned.

                                          The point is, you brought up the fact that your spouse prefers a 100% outdoor dog. Perhaps his view prevails, how are we to judge how seriously to take this?
                                          Last edited by Houndhill; May. 24, 2019, 09:36 PM.

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