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  • #61
    Originally posted by colorfan View Post
    hira11, funny thing, as much as I love the Collie, the smooth coat leaves me cold. I haven't met one in person, but have a f/b friend who has several. I know much depends on training but I have never had some of her problems in my rough collies.
    A newfie/aussie sounds great!

    I really appreciate the real person feedback on the breeds. So Beagles are out, I hadn't considered they were sight hounds.

    Does anyone have a Brittany?

    I have been trying to search out rescues, several have a policy of come and meet, then they will decide if you are a good fit. I get the policy, they are trying to re-home a dog that has already had at least two homes. (puppy home then the home surrended from) But I am not traveling 10 hours for a maybe.
    Two references, one including a vet is no problem.

    I am checking out all SPCA's within a days drive.
    oh, I was also going to suggest a smooth collie. I love them - right now I have three. The two older ones are titled in obedience, rally, nosework, agility, and flyball. The youngest is in training for agility and obedience and will start nosework soon. And all three love to hike and play fetch and all those "normal" dog activities. And best of all, all three are very dog-friendly and people-friendly!!

    My first smooth had too many health problems to do a lot, but she was the deep soul that got me started with the breed after a lifetime of retrievers. I am too lazy to keep up with the grooming needs of a rough, but I do love my smoothies!!

    I like the Brittanies I've met, but I don't know any very well. I see them doing agility and obedience, plus one lives in my neighborhood and is a nice dog fwiw.

    Comment


    • #62
      Originally posted by colorfan View Post
      I just saw an add for a German Shorthair Pointer. Anyone know about this breed?
      Very, very, very high activity needs (I know several). On my short list, if I ever get back into lots of dog sports and decide to switch from my retrievers and smoothies.

      Comment


      • #63
        How much hunting drive can you handle (general question because the dogs you are interested in are so different in their character/nature and jobs they are bred for)?
        And don't forget short coat also sheds - the hair can be stuck in carpets and textile like hell.

        Comment

        • Original Poster

          #64
          dkcbr, good to know thanks!

          Salo, yes, many posts have mentioned the short coat shedding, hm not sure what you mean about the hunting drive, I have a large fenced area( 1.5 acre) so there is lots of 'free moving' available but also area that isn't fenced so long line until recall is established.

          Comment


          • #65
            Originally posted by colorfan View Post

            Does anyone have a Brittany?

            .
            I have 3 now and have owned 6 in total. They are fabulous dogs but definitely shed and also require exercise. Smaller and less hard-headed or driven than most German Shorthaired Pointers which are also great dogs.

            Mine run all winter without need for jackets, even in negative temps. I also have a heated kennel where they can go in/out at will.

            I think they are quite similar in many othwr traits to Springers although hunting style is different.
            Attached Files

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            • #66
              Have a standard poodle, our first one after a long line of rescues. He's the best dog ever! Lots of energy outside but sleeps whenever inside. I don't understand why people breed doodles when the standard poodles are so nice!

              Comment


              • #67
                I missed the info your property is fenced in. Some breeds are a lifetime job to establish recall.

                I am not a fan of shedding too - but who loves this doggyhair everywhere thing? To me character counts, so I choose the breed that goes best with my everyday life/personality .... and I will vacuum for the rest of my life .

                Comment


                • #68
                  suzyq sadly dogs are subject to fashion - in my area standard poodles are rare though they are so smart

                  colorfan Clumber spaniel or Kooikerhondje?

                  Comment


                  • #69
                    These threads always illicit the exact same responses - but when a poster says the dog must be able to be outside in northern winters, that puts up my spidey senses. Unless the dog is bred for that it is not fair to the dog and I'd ask "why?". I'd like to know the dog always has options.
                    Proud member of People Who Hate to Kill Wildlife clique

                    Comment


                    • #70
                      Originally posted by Corbyville283 View Post
                      I own a 9 year old Irish Red and White Setter. He is the perfect dog for our lifestyle. He's out with us during the day when we're doing chores, is comfortable around the horses, cats, and guinea. He'll happily spend the day curled up on the couch but is equally keen to be out with the grandson playing in the fields. He does shed but gets by with weekly grooming. He barks at strangers so is some sort of deterrent watch dog but really is great with everyone. I've owned, goldens, samoyeds., colliies, shelties, springer spaniels and cocker spaniels and by far this dog is the best dog I've ever owned. He comes in from the fields looking like a mud puppy but dries off in no time and looks presentable. Doesn't have the oil coat of the lab so he doesn't smell. My vote for the best breed around.
                      I love your dog! What’s his name?

                      Comment


                      • #71
                        Originally posted by S1969 View Post

                        Argh. All of the "doodle breeds" have been around long enough that anyone trying to produce quality puppies should not still be crossing Goldens and Poodles. That is the equivalent of a "warmblood breeder" crossing Percherons and TBs. People do it but few take them seriously as "breeders."

                        Its just a mixed breed/grade animal. Breeders select the best offspring of the original cross and refine it over generations.
                        Not a dog breed person here, but from my understanding, the F1 cross is still the most desirable as pets?

                        Like when crossing anything, the F2, F3, etc. generations can be a bit of wild cards. Hence why a lot of the WB registries will allow you to register a 50% blooded horse, but won't necessarily approve them for breeding.

                        I've heard, and again, this isn't my field of specialty, that you lose the hybrid vigor of the "doodles" and the issues found in both breeds tend to start cropping up with frequency after the F2 generation with not much benefit in consistency.

                        I have to say, I have several friends and family with F1 goldendoodles and they are NICE dogs.
                        Don't fall for a girl who fell for a horse just to be number two in her world... ~EFO

                        Comment


                        • #72
                          Originally posted by Texarkana View Post

                          Not a dog breed person here, but from my understanding, the F1 cross is still the most desirable as pets?

                          Like when crossing anything, the F2, F3, etc. generations can be a bit of wild cards. Hence why a lot of the WB registries will allow you to register a 50% blooded horse, but won't necessarily approve them for breeding.

                          I've heard, and again, this isn't my field of specialty, that you lose the hybrid vigor of the "doodles" and the issues found in both breeds tend to start cropping up with frequency after the F2 generation with not much benefit in consistency.

                          I have to say, I have several friends and family with F1 goldendoodles and they are NICE dogs.
                          None of that makes sense. Why would a F1 cross make a better pet? And the F2 and F3 wouldnt be wild cards more than the F1. A poodle x golden might be more golden than poodle. Or nearly all poodle and little golden. The whole point of breeding is to reduce variability and increase the likelihood of the traits you selected for. Obviously if you dont decidr what to select for in advance it could be problematic. But why do it at all then?

                          All recognized breeds were developed from existing breeds. Eventually there is an agreement on type and the best examples are bred to each other

                          As for hybrid vigor, thats pretty much BS unless you're talking about natural selection and letting nature cull the bad specimens. You aren't less likely to pass on most genetic issues by mating two different breeds. E.g. if both are prone to cardiac issues or hip dysplasia there is no reduced likelihood because they are different "breeds." They are still the same species.

                          It is true that some breeds are prone to certain defects because those defects were accidentally selected for along with other traits. But they arent necessarily eliminated by cross breeding.


                          Comment


                          • #73
                            Originally posted by colorfan View Post
                            hira11, funny thing, as much as I love the Collie, the smooth coat leaves me cold. I haven't met one in person, but have a f/b friend who has several. I know much depends on training but I have never had some of her problems in my rough collies.
                            A newfie/aussie sounds great!

                            I really appreciate the real person feedback on the breeds. So Beagles are out, I hadn't considered they were sight hounds.

                            Does anyone have a Brittany?

                            I have been trying to search out rescues, several have a policy of come and meet, then they will decide if you are a good fit. I get the policy, they are trying to re-home a dog that has already had at least two homes. (puppy home then the home surrended from) But I am not traveling 10 hours for a maybe.
                            Two references, one including a vet is no problem.

                            I am checking out all SPCA's within a days drive.
                            Beagles are not sighthounds, they are scenthounds- dogs bred to trail/track prey by scent. Examples are beagles, foxhounds, coonhounds, bloodhounds.

                            In your OP you said you were not interested in beagles because you thought they were difficult to train, and I believe, you do not sound suited for these smart independent hunters. Beagles also fail your outdoor in severe winter requirement, unless kept together in a pack, where they can withstand lower temperatures.

                            Sighthounds are hound breeds developed for hunting prey by sight, such as Afghans, Salukis, greyhounds, Scottish Deerhounds, whippets, and many more. They have a double suspension gallop which enables them to cover ground very quickly, like a cheetah. They are typically very intelligent, gentle, loyal, but quite independent. I don’t believe these are the qualities you are looking for.

                            I think you would be well advised to steer clear of any hounds. It sounds like mutual frustration would ensue.

                            Same with terriers. Very smart, but independent, like hounds, bred to make their own decisions away from their owners.

                            I can’t think of two more unlike breeds than Afghans and Labs. Sounds like you might be better off with the Lab, Sporting, Herding, perhaps Standard Poodles although it may depend on your SO. How serious is he about wanting the dog to live outdoors? There will be quite a few breeders for whom that would not work.

                            Dont forget some of these breeds are prone to “dietary indiscretions” as puppies- they tend to eat non-food items like socks, potentially costing you thousands of dollars in vet bills, so you have to be pretty vigilant.

                            You might be best off with a Lab or a Golden. Sweet, forgiving, beginner-friendly, easily trainable, robust temperament. They would drive me nuts, I’d frankly rather heve a cat, but suit so many people.
                            Last edited by Houndhill; May. 23, 2019, 09:11 PM.

                            Comment


                            • #74
                              Originally posted by Houndhill View Post
                              . . .

                              Dont forget some of these breeds are prone to “dietary indiscretions” as puppies- they tend to eat non-food items like socks, potentially costing you thousands of dollars in vet bills, so you have to be pretty vigilant.
                              This is very true! Of my families 5 Labradors, one was unfortunately in this category. Countess would eat ANYTHING that had a smell. She once ate an entire box of 101 Crayola Crayons - box, sharpener and all! She pooped little crayon pieces for a couple of days, but was no worse for wear (thankfully). In her lifetime, she ate all sorts of things - an entire 5 pound wheel of waxed cheddar cheese, an entire meatloaf wrapped in tinfoil and one year the Easter bunny was dismayed that she had found the Easter baskets and wolfed down their entire contents! She was a great dog, and despite her gluttony issue, she lived a long life and was put to sleep at 14 because she had gone blind and had pretty bad arthritis that meds were really not helping anymore.

                              It's been a while, and I may be saying this wrong (Countess passed in like 1982?), but labs can have this type of "disorder" where they just will literally eat anything they think smells like food. Not talking about little puppies chewing on your sneakers, but actually consuming things they ought not to. Countess had this medical condition and had to be in a special muzzle when she was let outdoors, or she'd gorge on crabapples, wild strawberries, flowers, etc. The other 4 labs were just fine and did not have this issue.
                              ~~ How do you catch a loose horse? Make a noise like a carrot! - British Cavalry joke ~~

                              Comment


                              • #75
                                So true!

                                My friend who breeds Clumber Spaniels often has them somehow suck things into their crate and eat them, costing thousands.

                                i do know people with Bassets and Coonhounds who eat rocks with expensive outcomes (plus things like pantyhose in Eggs (remember those?), jewelry, make up, etc.

                                And lest one think Irish Wolfhounds are above this- I knew one from whose stomach, 18 Beanie Babies were recovered.

                                Comment


                                • #76
                                  This website is pretty good with general pros and cons of different breeds: https://www.yourpurebredpuppy.com/dogbreeds/

                                  I grew up with a cocker, a golden, and a cockapoo, had neighbors with labs, and housesat for friends with huskies. As an adult, I'm a short-hair fan all the way. (Wirehair may be ok too? I have no experience with it.)

                                  My dogs (pointers) shed *constantly*, and although I usually can't see it unless I'm really looking, it gets embedded in everything, which has its own problems (namely, irritating me through my clothes, but invisible so not removable).

                                  Regarding the energy thing, pointers are near the top. I think I've rarely had a day with them where I've been able to exhaust their physical energy reserves. The trick to tiring them out is mental engagement.

                                  Comment


                                  • #77
                                    What about a Goldendoodle? While I'm not at all a fan of hybrids, you would get the lovely personality of a Golden without all the hair since poodles do not shed. I was going to suggest a Burmese Mountain Dog, but they do have quite a bit of hair and their life span is on the shorter side. (9 years +/-) Both would be fine with winters and make great couch potatoes when inside.
                                    "Do what you can't do"

                                    Comment


                                    • #78
                                      Lagotto Romagnolo are family-friendly and quite trainable. But as Houndhill said, for many dogs and their breeders, outdoor means: going for a walk with their humans.

                                      tbchick84 do you mean Bernese?

                                      Comment


                                      • #79
                                        Originally posted by strangewings View Post
                                        This website is pretty good with general pros and cons of different breeds: https://www.yourpurebredpuppy.com/dogbreeds/
                                        Interesting website; as with all things like this I would take it as a baseline and then talk to people in the breed. It mentions "can be overly submissive" and "can be prone submissive urination" in the traits for a Brittany and I have to say I've never known any that have done this - and I know a lot of them because I'm active in the breed at the regional and national level.

                                        I agree that they are a "softer" dog than some other pointing breeds (e.g. GSP) and that could be why it is in there - if you train a Brittany like a Shorthair you may have problems. They definitely require a softer touch.

                                        I've known way more overexuberant greeter of strangers than submissive dogs. I can't really even think of any I would call submissive. A few are more reserved than others. Mine are definitely in the "overexuberant" category.

                                        Comment


                                        • #80
                                          Originally posted by GreyDes View Post
                                          We have a Standard Schnauzer and for the right person/situation they are fabulous dogs. Very high energy and tremendously intelligent. You will definitely have to put in training time and give him/her lots of exercise!

                                          I’d also look into a Foxhound. We’ve adopted three from our local hunt and they are sweethearts. There is a transition period from working dog to pet and once they are through that they are YOUR dog
                                          I will second the suggestion to consider a retired fox hound. I have one from my hunt and he is wonderful. They are bred to be biddable in the field, so most are obedient and wanting to please. Mine is smart and sweet and made the transition to the house very well (though it's not always that easy--personalities do vary).

                                          Bonus is that they are already used to being around horses and typically adapt well to their new pack (if you have other dogs) because they grew up in kennel and know how to navigate canine politics.

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