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  • #41
    I didn't read that the OP wanted an outside exclusively dog. Just one that can tolerate being outside for extended periods of time, like a couple hours when doing farm chores without shivering. If she wanted an outside dog, shedding wouldn't be an issue. My collie and shepherd are house dogs, but sturdy enough to be comfortable for several hours outside in the dead of winter. (I had to call the collie in during the polar vortex this year).

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    • #42
      I also love labs, but they shed more than my Aussies do.

      I'm babysitting my Dad's Golden and while she might not shed "as much" as my Aussies, her hair is finer and floats around a helluva lot more, and is just EVERYWHERE. Aussie hair balls up into tumbleweeds... I mean, not that I ever let that happen Seriously babysitting this girl for two weeks and my housecleaner QUITS. I'm dying. I need her when it's just my two.

      As for saying you need dogs who will chill inside, this honestly has to do entirely with how they are raised. Entirely. Even high energy stock dogs. My purebred Aussie I got a 10 weeks (bought and boarded for a couple weeks before I got him), and he was a regular puppy. He got crate trained (the drama...) and he would live in the crate when the house was void of people for mmmm 18ish months. But when I was home, if I wasn't interested in interacting with him, he got ignored. So he is now 3.5 and he is chill. He crashes on the couch and will snooze for hours. My Dad's dog on the other hand... He never lets her be bored. She brings him a toy and he sits on the couch and throws it throws it throws it. So she can't handle being left alone or ignored. I work 12 hour shifts, and I do have a friend come play auntie to my dogs. In the few hours between me living and her coming, the dog ate a couple bills, a sheet of stamps, dragged shoes everywhere... I have to keep all the doors locked so she can't get into anything, she once dragged all my clean clothes out of the dryer all over the house. She is 18 months old. She has been at my house now for a week and has started being able to handle laying on the deck without pestering me or the other dogs or running off to get into shenanigans.
      COTH's official mini-donk enabler

      "I am all for reaching out, but in some situations it needs to be done with a rolled up news paper." Alagirl

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      • #43
        Originally posted by 4LeafCloverFarm View Post
        Well, I probably shouldn't call them different "breeds", because that's really technically wrong. After all, the "American" labrador retriever was started from Labradors from England. However, over time, with breeding and use as working field dogs, they took on different appearance over the years. So, its probably correct to refer to them as "types" of Labrador retrievers. But if you have a pure "English" lab and a pure "American" lab of the same color side by side, you can really see the difference. Back in 1979, they were really new and unique (the English lab that is). Now, 40 years later, the lines between the two two may be more blurred.
        Sorry my post wasn't clear. I meant that I'm not very familiar with the labrador retriever breed in general. I don't have any direct experience with them other than my own dog, who is a pet and companion, not a working dog. Since I ended up with one I did some research, but no research replaces experience with the breed.

        Thanks for the info, that is very interesting.

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        • #44
          Just a thought for the OP ... of course you want a healthy dog, but I hope you won't be too hung up on perfect conformation and/or color, or what source the dog comes from. Of course we each need a dog that is suitable for our purpose, but beyond that the dog can't control the check boxes (doesn't even know about them) and it still needs a good home.

          I sometimes think that our (human) training to hyper-examine horses and dogs for perfection can go too far in situations where perfection isn't really necessary. Just suitable to the purpose. Much of the time some "flaws" and imperfections don't really matter.

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          • #45
            My first instinct when looking for a dog is the SPCA. All my dogs were from there, mutts and all, good dogs. Shedding dogs. Mostly shepherd crosses as that is my preference.

            But when I couldn't find anything suitable at my local SPCA, I got into Std poodles...and my first one was the BEST dog I've ever had.
            She really was a one-of-a-kind dog. So easy to train, it didn't feel like I was training her. Didn't shed, was active when I was (I would take her on long trail rides), would sleep at home all day if no one was there. And she was MY dog.
            Only drawback is that poodles need to be groomed regularly, but I wasn't too strict with mine and let her go 2 months or more - no prob.

            My current Std poodle is a much different character, more of a Moyen size too, which I love! Not as attached to me, since we got her when she was 3 and she is more a family dog, which is great. Great sense of humor, easy to train.

            I would not let my dogs live outside, but when not groomed too short, they are perfectly happy in Maine winters for walks and barn chores.
            Ottbs - The finish line is only the beginning!

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            • #46
              Originally posted by walkinthewalk View Post
              My only comment is tpwhen you decid on a breed, PLEASE look at purebred rescues FIRST. You say you like to train so rehabbing one of them shouldn't be an issue for you
              There's such a world of difference between a well bred dog an 90% plus of what's in purebred rescue. I help with rescue for my chosen breed. The Pembrokes that end up in breed rescue are very, very, rarely good examples of the breed since the good breeders take back their own

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              • #47
                I own a 9 year old Irish Red and White Setter. He is the perfect dog for our lifestyle. He's out with us during the day when we're doing chores, is comfortable around the horses, cats, and guinea. He'll happily spend the day curled up on the couch but is equally keen to be out with the grandson playing in the fields. He does shed but gets by with weekly grooming. He barks at strangers so is some sort of deterrent watch dog but really is great with everyone. I've owned, goldens, samoyeds., colliies, shelties, springer spaniels and cocker spaniels and by far this dog is the best dog I've ever owned. He comes in from the fields looking like a mud puppy but dries off in no time and looks presentable. Doesn't have the oil coat of the lab so he doesn't smell. My vote for the best breed around.

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                • #48
                  Originally posted by Marshfield View Post

                  There's such a world of difference between a well bred dog an 90% plus of what's in purebred rescue. I help with rescue for my chosen breed. The Pembrokes that end up in breed rescue are very, very, rarely good examples of the breed since the good breeders take back their own
                  True.... but rescuers are needed, and if you can train a dog, it can work out fine. The dogs we raised from puppies were of course better trained, but we have been equally close to the full grown dogs we've adopted. There's a lot of love out there that needs to be rescued.

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                  • #49
                    OverandOnward - I was just correcting my earlier post about our families English/American labs. I realized the way I said it, it sounded like they were two breeds of dog, but they are recognized as one breed by kennel clubs. So I was just clarifying that they are types of lab, not breeds. So I wasn't commenting on a post you made.
                    ~~ How do you catch a loose horse? Make a noise like a carrot! - British Cavalry joke ~~

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                    • Original Poster

                      #50
                      Thank you, I appreciate the feedback on the various breeds. If I ever come across a foxhound I might try one. Great point about how much labs shed.
                      Red and white setters hey, I didn't know they were a breed.

                      I do have a bit of a conflict going, most of the dogs I visually think are attractive have a longer coat.

                      Does anyone have a Beagle? I have seen them on a smart dog list as the 'least' trainable/smart dog. So cute tho.

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                      • Original Poster

                        #51
                        I am leaning towards a Springer, or possible poodle.

                        Thejenners, I agree, training plays a big part in the result.


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                        • #52
                          Well... Beagles bark...a lot. But if you wanted to take up rabbit hunting, afoot, great choice!

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                          • #53
                            I don't know, how cold your winters are, but you may need a dog with enough underwool. Some longhaired dogs seem robust, but have no or little underwool.
                            Friends of mine fall for Leonberger.

                            I switched from showdogs to rescues years ago (I am a foster home) - all of them developed great. Dogs reflect their surroundings - training is half the rent.

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                            • #54
                              Originally posted by colorfan View Post
                              Thank you, I appreciate the feedback on the various breeds. If I ever come across a foxhound I might try one. Great point about how much labs shed.
                              Red and white setters hey, I didn't know they were a breed.

                              I do have a bit of a conflict going, most of the dogs I visually think are attractive have a longer coat.

                              Does anyone have a Beagle? I have seen them on a smart dog list as the 'least' trainable/smart dog. So cute tho.
                              I've had a beagle. I adopted her as a senior from the local shelter. They're basically a nose on 4 legs. Hounds are often considered "dumb" but the fact is they were bred to hunt independently so don't rely on human direction like sporting or herding dogs. They are far from dumb, my hounds often showed phenomenal problem solving ability. They are trainable provided you provide the proper motivation. They get bored easily and don't see the point of rote repetition.

                              I love scent hounds. I've had beagles, Bassets, dachshunds and currently have a black & tan Coonhound and a bloodhound. I've got a thing for floppy ears.

                              Comment


                              • #55
                                Originally posted by Tyrus' Mom View Post

                                True.... but rescuers are needed, and if you can train a dog, it can work out fine. The dogs we raised from puppies were of course better trained, but we have been equally close to the full grown dogs we've adopted. There's a lot of love out there that needs to be rescued.
                                While this should be another whole thread - rescuers are needed in part because people are so willing to buy poorly bred dogs from terrible breeders. The "adopt don't shop" movement has made buying from a quality breeder a taboo (this thread is a perfect example), but allowed bad breeders to flourish and rescue organizations to become the conduit between them and pet buyers who want to do a good deed. If more people chose their breeds and breeders with care, there would be far fewer dogs needing to be rescued.

                                Just yesterday members of my breed club were discussing a "breeder" that has several litters of puppies born just days/weeks apart - 5 litters in our breed and several in other breeds. There have been numerous complaints with the Better Business Bureau and AKC (because these puppies are "registered" and have some good lines in their pedigree - way back). But they are being churned out 20-30 a season with no health testing, no guarantees.

                                Guess where a lot of those puppies end up? Breed rescue. Because they aren't great examples of what you should expect when you look for a specific breed.

                                Back to the OP - Beagles are adorable but they are scent hounds so they are not the type of dog that you would leave loose while working in your barn, for example. They might not come back for days. If you have fencing you might like them. One of my friends got one and said it will be her last - she also has Brittanys. In comparison he has been very difficult to train, although he is so incredibly cute that it's hard not to love him anyway.

                                A Springer would be a good choice although again - training is important. Some of my dogs have been better "loose" than others. If you have enough property it is likely they won't get too far away but they are hunting dogs. My Brittanys are great off lead if I'm there; not sure how well they would adapt to being let out "loose". As I said, I have had 2 that could - but one was abnormally obedient.

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                                • #56
                                  Around here the Goldendoodles have become very, very popular. My current poodle was actually a breeding dog used to produce goldendoodles before she came to me.

                                  As for Beagles....the few I've known totally turned me against that breed lol. Always barking, could never be trained well enough to be reliably off leash, and one of them in my neighborhood got loose and viciously attacked my dog who was minding her own business walking at my heel. Yeah, I don't like Beagles much lol

                                  Leonbergers, St Bernards, Newfoundlands, Pyrénées....beautiful dogs but NOT for inside the house! St Bernards drool and smell and shed so much!
                                  Ottbs - The finish line is only the beginning!

                                  Comment


                                  • #57
                                    Originally posted by sophie View Post
                                    Around here the Goldendoodles have become very, very popular. My current poodle was actually a breeding dog used to produce goldendoodles before she came to me.
                                    !
                                    Argh. All of the "doodle breeds" have been around long enough that anyone trying to produce quality puppies should not still be crossing Goldens and Poodles. That is the equivalent of a "warmblood breeder" crossing Percherons and TBs. People do it but few take them seriously as "breeders."

                                    Its just a mixed breed/grade animal. Breeders select the best offspring of the original cross and refine it over generations.

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                                    • #58
                                      I am with you on the thought of Collies being THE best. I will forever have a rough coat in my life. My current one is a blue mer. male, and hes absolutely beautiful but he is dumb as a box of rocks! Certainly not saving Timmy from any wells Being in total agreement that collies are the best of the best, I can sympathize why you might not want to have the gentle reminder of a truly great past one. But, if the hair is really a deterrent, have you considered a smooth coat? One of my best fosters was a gorgeous smooth coated tr and you get the amazing collie personality without the hair upkeep. They still shed, but it was NOTHING compared to the rough coats I have had/have and the newfie/aussie cross in our family too. I have to brush my carpets before I vacuum!


                                      "True love is taking away their pain, and making it your own. "

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                                      • Original Poster

                                        #59
                                        hira11, funny thing, as much as I love the Collie, the smooth coat leaves me cold. I haven't met one in person, but have a f/b friend who has several. I know much depends on training but I have never had some of her problems in my rough collies.
                                        A newfie/aussie sounds great!

                                        I really appreciate the real person feedback on the breeds. So Beagles are out, I hadn't considered they were sight hounds.

                                        Does anyone have a Brittany?

                                        I have been trying to search out rescues, several have a policy of come and meet, then they will decide if you are a good fit. I get the policy, they are trying to re-home a dog that has already had at least two homes. (puppy home then the home surrended from) But I am not traveling 10 hours for a maybe.
                                        Two references, one including a vet is no problem.

                                        I am checking out all SPCA's within a days drive.

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                                        • Original Poster

                                          #60
                                          I just saw an add for a German Shorthair Pointer. Anyone know about this breed?

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