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  • dog type

    I am in the market for a new dog. Slowly exploring breeds I havent had before. I have had Rough Collies, Cocker spaniels and GS mixes.
    Trying to learn about dog breeds by reading is quite a bit like trying to learn about horse breeds by reading wiki.
    So I thought I would ask for some personal opinions.

    My requirements are: the dog must be in and out, able to be outside in northern winters but mellow enough to hang out in the house during northern winters when we don't get out as much. (border collie is out)
    Less hair!
    Trainable, I enjoy training, do spend a fair bit of time with the dog, am consistent but don't want something as challengeing as an Akita, Chow Chow or Beagle.
    I don't want to redo the Collie, partly because I am over the hair, and partly because I still miss my special collie girl. Temperment wise I found the collie to be a perfect mix of energy when we went out but chill enough to hang out during the winter, never got anxiety if I was away for the day.

    I love the look of a Springer Spaniel, wondering if they are similar to a BC and need more stimulation than I can give.
    Wondering about an English setter, have never known one personally
    a Golden Retriever seems like a good fit but no idea how to find a good breeder, so many health problems in the breed now.
    Have considered an australian shepherd, but there seems to be such a variety in the breed.
    Afghan dogs are absolutely beautiful, but again no personal contact. What are they like, really?
    My friends growing up had standard poodles, one was a wonderful dog and one was a noisy snappy thing, I have a fondness for them but not sure if it was the training or the breed(ing) that was the problem.
    Schnauzers are cute but again don't know them.

    I would like to hear your experiences with the breeds I have mentioned or any you think may be a good fit.

  • #2
    Setters can be high-strung, but are very loyal and friendly dogs.

    For a golden retriever, or Labrador retriever, you might check in your area for a lab rescue. There are so many purebred dogs that need new forever homes. I can't say enough good things about labs - I grew up with several american labs and English labs. Great dogs, great temperament, friendly, do anything you ask, always aim to please.

    I had a college friend and roommate that had an Afghan. She was a bit aloof (the dog, not the friend!), but very friendly. But they have a lot of hair! Like long, long, silky hair (well at least the one I knew did).

    Same college friend also had a standard poodle. She had a lot of energy, but was very well behaved in the house. Lovely dog. Now standard poodles love to swim, so if you are near any bodies of water, they may go for a dip!

    But I wouldn't forgo a visit to your local shelter. So many puppies/dogs without a pedigree need a new family. Muts can make the best of dogs. Our dog Bailey showed up at our farm on a late Jan day in 6 inches of snow with two other puppies 9 years ago. Best dog ever. No clue what her parentage is.
    Last edited by 4LeafCloverFarm; May. 20, 2019, 06:37 PM.
    ~~ How do you catch a loose horse? Make a noise like a carrot! - British Cavalry joke ~~

    Comment


    • #3
      My personal favorites are GS and Border Collie. Not sure what you mean about " 'out' in northern winters." I don't leave any dog outside for a prolonged period of time in cold weather. Bouvier's are built for cold weather. Ours was big and friendly. He was great in the house and I have pics of him with baby chicks crawling over his feet. We didn't clip his ears or tail. They are long haired. Mom shaved him in summer. (I know, I know) The smartest dogs we've had were GS and Border Collie. Every mutt we've ever had was terrific. Ours showed up at the gate too. 4Leaf- Love your pic!

      Comment


      • #4
        Another vote to take a look at labs. And rescues and shelters for labs, as a dog trainer tells me that labs are one of the breeds that appears frequently in shelters. They have a lot of energy and require owner time, and turn out to be too much dog for people who don't do as you are doing and realistically research breeds vs their preferred lifestyle.

        My lab is an all-day back-of-the-pickup for every farm chore type of dog. A short (but intense) nap and he's ready for the next adventure of the day. He is nose-led, but wasn't hard to teach a rock-solid 'come'. Fetches the newspaper every morning with great exuberance. Loves everybody. Does tricks for children.

        Perfect watchdog as far as I'm concerned: Makes a big display of barking, running and jumping back & forth along the fence, but has never and probably never will bite anyone. People don't want to mess with him. But those who know labs come right on in the fence anyway, and the dog delightedly adds this new friend to his large collection.

        Very smart but also needs a lot of attention and exercise. I got a trainer's help with mine, as otherwise the dog and I would be condemned to his lifetime of misery due to lack of communication. Two good trainer sessions at home gave us the start we needed. I really put in the time with him when he was younger, figuring it was a one-chance-to-get-it-right deal. It takes endless patience to insert "think first" and "always listen and respond to me" into the high impulsiveness, but we got there. He's a best-dog-ever.

        (Although he did once blast through a closed screen door when he forgot to wait for someone to open it for him. OK he did that twice, but that's twice in 9 years, so ....)

        Shedding: I'm not sure I believe that a collie sheds more than my lab! The flat coat is extremely dense and seems to shed all year long, particularly the undercoat. I vacuum dog hair every second day. But when clean his coat is soft and cuddly.

        Good for cold weather climates, my dog's favorite day is a damp windy 45 F. He doesn't fare so well in humid heat, though. But he charges through the ice cover on a pond just as enthusiastically as he does all water, and will play in said freezing water for minutes at a time, then re-join the trail ride in below-freezing weather, all wet and perfectly happy.

        Also believes that anything on a cross-country course that the horse can jump, he can jump, too (banks it of course, and may park on top for a look around before flying off the other side). The dog is committed to proving his worth against the horse. He does get along with the horses, though.

        There is one thing, though - if there is water, the lab is in it. Doesn't matter if it is cruddy, muddy and weed-infested. I keep dog soap and dog towel in my car at all times and have learned how to find a garden hose anywhere, for before he gets back in the car.

        Comment


        • #5
          My only comment is tpwhen you decid on a breed, PLEASE look at purebred rescues FIRST. You say you like to train so rehabbing one of them shouldn't be an issue for you

          Comment


          • #6
            We have a Standard Schnauzer and for the right person/situation they are fabulous dogs. Very high energy and tremendously intelligent. You will definitely have to put in training time and give him/her lots of exercise!

            I’d also look into a Foxhound. We’ve adopted three from our local hunt and they are sweethearts. There is a transition period from working dog to pet and once they are through that they are YOUR dog

            Comment


            • #7
              If able to be outside in northern winters means the dog will be outside for an extended period of time, then I would not want you to have anything other than an Alaskan Malamute, Siberian Husky or another truly northern breed when it is cold. Most breeds will enjoy being outside with you and hiking or playing when it is cold, but should be inside with you otherwise. And I wonder why people want dogs who do not live inside with them so that their companionship and joy can be savored.

              I had difficulty when I showed collies because I did not leave mine outside to grow those thick show coats. Mine did their best winning in spring through fall.

              I have often read that it is not good for dogs who are accustomed to living outdoors in cold weather to be brought inside sometimes. They are adapted to their environment. Makes sense to me, but I have no frame of reference for this.

              Comment


              • #8
                I also vote for lab. There may be rescues in your area, but responsible breeders should sell you a dog with many genetic/heath tests done that would help with your worry about health issues. The breeder I know that breeds (mostly charcoal and silver, so dilute black and chocolate) thoroughly tests his dogs and breeds well put together and good tempered dogs. So if you find the right breeder, your odds are better. If I cannot support a rescue, I'd like to support a responsible breeder.

                My grandparents had a wonderful Standard Poodle. Better on the shedding front than a lab, obviously. He was a good all around dog, and my grandfather was able to trim his hair, so he didn't go to an actual groomer often. They also taught him all sorts of tricks and he was very well trained. They live where winters get quite cold. Great dog.

                There are also Labradoodles if you want a combination! I don't have much experience with them though.

                The shelters here are smaller and most dogs have somewhat serious bahavior issues or needs. People typically only give them up or have them taken away if they have serious issues. Most cannot be kept with cats, so I mostly donate to rescues as I have cats and many of the dogs aren't suitable for me to adopt. In your area, it may be different and I'd take a look. You never know what you may find.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Another vote for a lab or lab cross.

                  My first dog was a lab x border collie. Such a kind loving girl, best farm dog too. Always ready to go, but happy to snuggle on the couch. Perfect family dog, helped me raise my kids. And saved me from a rank horse at the barn.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by walkinthewalk View Post
                    My only comment is tpwhen you decid on a breed, PLEASE look at purebred rescues FIRST. You say you like to train so rehabbing one of them shouldn't be an issue for you
                    I hate this type of reply. What is wrong with finding a breeder that selects for health, temperament and soundness? I can't understand why that is considered "undesirable" but instead people feel that they must seek out dogs/puppies that were produced by crappy breeders instead.

                    My first response to the OP is that your breeds are all over the map, and they almost all shed. Springer Spaniel, Setters, Golden, Afghan, Australian Shepherd, Poodle, Schnauzer....You've got 5 different breed groups in this list - which is odd, because they tend to be grouped by function. You've also got 3 breeds well known for their high energy needs - Springers, Aussies, Poodles. If that's not something you want, you may want to reconsider your criteria.

                    I also wonder what you mean by "being out" in winter. Out for a walk and won't need a coat? Out in a kennel? Outside all day? I would say all of the breeds above could be out without a coat and could also be kept in a heated kennel (indoor heated, outdoor outside), but not expected to be outside for hours.

                    I'd say if you're looking for medium/large, intelligent, stable, and not a shedder - the Standard Poodle is the most suitable on your list. They are known to be really great dogs - so the noisy, snappy, one you knew may be an outlier, and/or had poor breeding or training. But they are smart - you definitely need to be prepared to provide mental and physical stimulation or they will create some on their own.

                    Of your sporting dogs (Springer, Setter, Golden) - the Setters and Goldens will likely be less high energy than the Springer, but both of those breeds will shed like crazy, and Setters may also have some specific grooming requirements with long feathering (not hard, in my opinion). The Setters I have known personally are very sweet but tend to be a little more reserved/aloof than Goldens. (My breeder (Brittanys) used to think it was that they weren't very smart, but after she got to know some very well she has since decided it's temperament, not intelligence). A well-bred Golden is exactly like their reputation - easy, friendly, loyal.

                    If you could narrow your criteria it might be easier. How important is the shedding issue?

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by S1969 View Post

                      I hate this type of reply. What is wrong with finding a breeder that selects for health, temperament and soundness? I can't understand why that is considered "undesirable" but instead people feel that they must seek out dogs/puppies that were produced by crappy breeders instead.

                      I have rescued dogs my entire life, so in kind reply, I hate your type of reply.

                      I stand by what I said. What a shame that you are so unwilling to take a chance on a dog bred by "crappy breeders".

                      FWIW, I have a 2 year old Rottweiler that was re homed to me - papers and all. By gosh she DID come from a very ethical breeder. Matter-of-fact my Rottie still has her tail and her sire won a championship with his tail in fact a few days after he came to the U.S. From Germany. I k ow all this because the dog's papers came with her. Had they not come with her, people who harbor notions like your comment above would chalk her up to a "crappy bred" dog because she ended up on a breed rescue list.

                      To reiterate, the owners did everything right with her, including obedience classes. She lived in the house. Their life took a big change and they had to re-home her.

                      They looked three months for a great home for her with no luck. Had it not been for a mutual state trooper friend, this great "well put together dog" (my vet's words) may have ended up on a Rottweiler breed rescue site, where anyone with your mindset would scoff at her, and wave her off as one of those "crappy bred dogs".

                      To reiterate again, I have rescued unwanted dogs my entire life. There's a lot of "perfection" running around, that really isn't -- some of those purebred landed on my farm, alongside mixed breeds. They ALL had great minds with almost zero health issues until they got up in years


                      Comment


                      • #12
                        My neighbor had an Afghan, goofy, friendly, lovely. Keep in mind they are sight hounds. Once she spotted a deer and was GONE. Gracefully galloped away and was gone for 2 hours. I don’t recall her being particularly well trained, but she was excellent for a family with 3 kids. Her gallop was at the speed of a horses canter, so they can really run, and it’s incredibly graceful, but you may not need that.

                        i imagine, having had a collie you loved, you might want a breed that is focused on their human, rather than a skill set geared for a job. Does that sound accurate?

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by walkinthewalk View Post

                          I have rescued dogs my entire life, so in kind reply, I hate your type of reply.

                          I stand by what I said. What a shame that you are so unwilling to take a chance on a dog bred by "crappy breeders".

                          FWIW, I have a 2 year old Rottweiler that was re homed to me - papers and all. By gosh she DID come from a very ethical breeder. Matter-of-fact my Rottie still has her tail and her sire won a championship with his tail in fact a few days after he came to the U.S. From Germany. I k ow all this because the dog's papers came with her. Had they not come with her, people who harbor notions like your comment above would chalk her up to a "crappy bred" dog because she ended up on a breed rescue list.
                          You are perfectly justified in choosing to spend your whole life rescuing dogs if you wish. It's the idea that you will tell someone else that THEY must also feel the way you do that irks me.

                          I think rescue is awesome. And breed rescue is also awesome.

                          But I think that there are many reasons to select a quality breeder - especially when you are looking for a BREED of dog. One that is representative of the breed standard - so not only does it look like it should, but its temperament is also representative of the breed. A standard poodle should not be yappy, a Springer should not be fractious, a Rottweiler should not be aggressive.

                          Your story about the Rottweiler is a - 'big deal.' A registered purebred puppy from a champion sire is no indication of a "quality breeder" or a "quality dog" - good looking, championed studs are a dime a dozen. I have two of them and they are not highly sought after even though they are well known in my breed. It's easy to find semen. And lots of people are happy to take a stud fee to breed their dog to a bitch that isn't a quality dam. I don't. But I have been asked numerous times.

                          And it is true that some well-bred dogs end up in rescue. They are definitely the minority.

                          Feel free to rescue dogs forever. I think that's great. But I don't understand why you tell other people to rescue rather than seek out a quality breeder. It would be like me going to the Sport Horse Breeding forum and telling people to go to New Holland instead.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            I love my labs but they shed a lot, all year round.

                            I would not go for a labradoodle. I know too many that are high strung. Most of them come from bad back yard breeders or puppy mills that got into breeding for a quick buck. They don't tend to come from well bred labs or well bred poodles. Most breeders don't bother with any health testing.

                            I agree with the one poster that recommended a foxhound. We adopted a lovely foxhound from a local hunt when it was time for her to retire. As she got older we would put a dog jacket on her when it was really cold. She lived to be over 15 years old. Since they are bred to live in packs they tend to get along well with other dogs. She was good with people.

                            We had a stray that showed up that was likely a flat coated retriever. She came with baggage but once we worked through that was a great dog. I would consider that breed again. She really only shedded much twice a year.

                            As far as rescue versus not rescue I do both. My labs I have gotten as puppies from good breeders that show and do extensive health testing. If you are looking for a specific breed and want a puppy going with a good breeder is probably the best bet. I prefer the stockier English type labs versus the leaner American field type lab. So I go with a breeder that breeds that type.

                            If you are looking for young adult or adult then a breed rescue or local shelter may fit your needs. With an adult you mostly know what you are getting for size and temperment.

                            My foxhound came from a local hunt, the American Eskimo dog came from the local shelter, the flat coated retriever showed up at the local Catholic Church as a stray, I had a border collie/Malamute cross from a local no-kill. My next dog will likely be a friend's dog that she will need to rehome due to a divorce. Eventually I will get another lab puppy and will probably go the breeder route again for that puppy.

                            Oh, well, clearly you're not thoroughly indoctrinated to COTH yet, because finger pointing and drawing conclusions are the cornerstones of this great online community. (Tidy Rabbit)

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by S1969 View Post

                              You are perfectly justified in choosing to spend your whole life rescuing dogs if you wish. It's the idea that you will tell someone else that THEY must also feel the way you do that irks me.

                              I think rescue is awesome. And breed rescue is also awesome.

                              But I think that there are many reasons to select a quality breeder - especially when you are looking for a BREED of dog. One that is representative of the breed standard - so not only does it look like it should, but its temperament is also representative of the breed. A standard poodle should not be yappy, a Springer should not be fractious, a Rottweiler should not be aggressive.

                              Your story about the Rottweiler is a - 'big deal.' A registered purebred puppy from a champion sire is no indication of a "quality breeder" or a "quality dog" - good looking, championed studs are a dime a dozen. I have two of them and they are not highly sought after even though they are well known in my breed. It's easy to find semen. And lots of people are happy to take a stud fee to breed their dog to a bitch that isn't a quality dam. I don't. But I have been asked numerous times.

                              And it is true that some well-bred dogs end up in rescue. They are definitely the minority.

                              Feel free to rescue dogs forever. I think that's great. But I don't understand why you tell other people to rescue rather than seek out a quality breeder. It would be like me going to the Sport Horse Breeding forum and telling people to go to New Holland instead.
                              People that are looking to use an animal for a very targeted purpose and have high expectations that the animal will be able to fill that role with a very high degree of excellence, yes. You want to ride FEI dressage, run 1D barrels, win Tevis (as opposed to finish Tevis), earn a Schutzhund championship, run the Iditarod, have a real working herding dog on your sheep farm, yes you absolutely would be best served seeking out quality breeders of animals that have been purpose-bred for those sports/activities. Obviously if you really want to be involved with breed shows, conformation/halter, or are simply really attached to that breed because it’s what you grew up with, etc. you are best served seeking out an animal from a good breeder of those animals. And you should be prepared to wait a long time, and pay a quite large sum of money to get that potential. Truly good breeders of most dog breeds, particularly uncommon ones, often have waiting lists years long. They also may have strings attached/requirements that are different from what a rescue would have (a good rescue often does have strings/requirements). Retaining co-ownership, requiring the dog be competed, requiring the dog be kept intact and bred if it meets certain criteria, are all strings I’ve seen.

                              The vast, vast majority of prospective dog owners are looking for something on the spectrum, in equine terms, of somewhere between “pasture pet/lawn ornament” and “I just want to have some fun and spend time working with my horse and trying some stuff, maybe do a little “X” and see how far we get.” Those people absolutely have a high probability of finding what they need through rescues (and in the case of horses the various tamed/trained BLM Mustang acquisition options). If somebody comes around asking about breed suggestions or where to look for a low-level *whatever* kind of horse, absolutely I think it’s appropriate to point them to rescues, the Extreme Mustang Makeover, etc. OP does not SEEM to be looking for a particular breed (or they wouldn’t be asking for breed suggestions), nor have particular specific aspirations for competitive or other activities that would really, really preclude some breeds/types of dog for success (don’t see a lot of Bassets doing flyball, for obvious reasons). Even things like Agility, there are plenty of people who get out there with oddball dogs because its fun, challenging and they are competing against their own best performance rather than for a ribbon, much like people who get into Dressage, endurance, or eventing with oddball mounts.

                              I wouldn’t consider getting a horse from New Holland or a similar auction and dog rescue as equivalencies, at all. That would be equivalent (IMO) to taking in a random stray street dog from someplace with high rates of rabies, heartworm disease and/or distemper—lets face it, horses don’t wind up at New Holland, in general, because they are sound and healthy. Nothing inherently wrong with the idea, for the person or organization with the right resources and expectations, but a much bigger gamble than many people are willing to (or should) take on, and nobody is suggesting that in this case. A good rescue, even most government run animal control shelters these days, does at least a limited health check and temperament assessment, and many do more than that.

                              @colorfan: regardless of whether you decide to look for a purebred whatever or seek out a rescue (which I would encourage), keep in mind that there’s a certain contradiction in wanting a dog that can tolerate being outdoors in a Northern Winter (and I trust you don’t mean “put out and leave out”) and not wanting to have to deal with hair. All dogs that can handle a fair amount of cold have SOME kind of significant hair, whether it’s long and poofy and needs a lot of brushing and other upkeep (Poodle model), short and dense and constantly replenishing itself all over your furniture (retriever model), or double coated and you feel like a dog has exploded in your house twice a year (shepherd/husky model). So, you’ll either need to decide which hassle you want to deal with, get a dog small enough to use a litterbox in the winter, or invest in coats/booties.

                              Temperament/trainability wise, IN GENERAL, dogs from breeds/groups/backgrounds that were developed to work closely with and under the direct guidance and control of people are going to be more “biddable” (amenable to learning commands, seek out praise and work for it). Herding group, retrievers, etc. Breeds developed exclusively as companions (e.g. Havanese) also tend to be more biddable. Breeds developed to mostly live/work independently or with very limited control from a person (pack hunters like Beagles, sighthounds, most terriers, pointer and setter type gundogs, sled dogs) are often not very biddable, at least not if you expect them to learn based on praise rewards. Many of them are highly motivated by other things (USDA uses Beagles for port of entry inspections, in part, because they tend to be very, very motivated to FIND FOOD, whippets can be good Frisbee dogs because CHASE), though, so if you cater to that they are more trainable than often perceived.

                              Personally, I like herding group dogs. The dog I grew up with was a BC cross my parents got as a puppy from the city pound, my first personal dog was a six months or so Sheltie cross I just couldn’t leave behind when I went to the county animal control to volunteer to help clean the dogs up to make them more presentable. Current dog I stalked a reputable rescue group that fostered (by that time I had kids and it was important to me that the dog had some track record around kids) until a dog caught my eye. He’s a bit larger than we wanted, I was stalking for something more the size of my Sheltie X. At least he was apparently older than we thought; he had fresh new adult teeth and one floppy ear, weighed forty pounds, and we thought he was a GSD cross and would wind up 70 or so. Nope, must’ve been much closer to a year, the floppy ear straightened within a week and he only gained four more pounds, much of which was filling out. Phew! He resembles a “Kelpie” although I’m sure he is not. He’s double-coated, so we have a lot of hair issues, but almost entirely during the spring and fall shed and the major explosion is pretty short-lived.

                              BTW, he had been transported to MN (where we were living at the time), from a shelter in KY that was maxed out and no longer had room to hold dogs for more than three (maybe less) days before euthanizing them. So, yeah, unless and until I get some wild hair about doing something with my critters that makes their bloodline all THAT important, I’m not personally going to get a purebred anything unless one happens to turn up in a shelter/rescue that otherwise fits the bill at a time I looking to add on.

                              Comment


                              • #16
                                I have two retired racing Greyhounds. They both love being barn dogs.

                                They do tolerate North West NJ winters with there coats and sometime booties. I don't leave them out for long hours but they do hang at the barn while I am there.

                                They tend to just find a place to sleep as their favorite activity. They do not need much grooming so not much hair for you to deal with in the house. I find they also tend to not be barkers which is a plus.

                                I am also fond of going to a local shelter and adopting a dog from there too if I connect with them.

                                Comment


                                • #17
                                  I will second arbeegirl to consider a greyhound (or two ) I also have two retired racers and they are tip top dogs. Many of them come with excellent leash manners "installed" already, and they are pretty easy to train for basic obedience: sit/stay/down etc. Both of mine have recall - one is excellent and one is okay but being sighthounds they are never off leash when not fenced.

                                  We live in Canada and they are pretty happy intrepid winter walkers - with coats (and boots when it's below -10/too icy). They also adore staying in and sleeping for hours or chewing on a bone and then sleeping for hours. They love getting out for exercise but are chill about staying in. Mine NEED a decent long walk or run in the park 1-2x per week, and can otherwise cope with the usual 20 min 3x/day.

                                  They can be timid dogs - one of mine is a super alpha who is fazed by nothing at all, super laid back and easy peasy - his temperament is pretty much always at a 3 whether at home or out and about. The other is very shy with strangers and can be a bit spooky - but he's also the bigger cuddlebug at home and super duper playful and foolish when he's comfortable.

                                  I've had my one boy for 6.5 years now - he's 10 years old and going strong. We added the second one 18 months ago and he's just 4.5 now. Couldn't recommend the breed more.

                                  Comment


                                  • #18
                                    Originally posted by S1969 View Post

                                    You are perfectly justified in choosing to spend your whole life rescuing dogs if you wish. It's the idea that you will tell someone else that THEY must also feel the way you do that irks me.

                                    I think rescue is awesome. And breed rescue is also awesome.

                                    But I think that there are many reasons to select a quality breeder - especially when you are looking for a BREED of dog. One that is representative of the breed standard - so not only does it look like it should, but its temperament is also representative of the breed. A standard poodle should not be yappy, a Springer should not be fractious, a Rottweiler should not be aggressive.

                                    Your story about the Rottweiler is a - 'big deal.' A registered purebred puppy from a champion sire is no indication of a "quality breeder" or a "quality dog" - good looking, championed studs are a dime a dozen. I have two of them and they are not highly sought after even though they are well known in my breed. It's easy to find semen. And lots of people are happy to take a stud fee to breed their dog to a bitch that isn't a quality dam. I don't. But I have been asked numerous times.

                                    And it is true that some well-bred dogs end up in rescue. They are definitely the minority.

                                    Feel free to rescue dogs forever. I think that's great. But I don't understand why you tell other people to rescue rather than seek out a quality breeder. It would be like me going to the Sport Horse Breeding forum and telling people to go to New Holland instead.
                                    I went back and re-read what I typed.

                                    I DID NOT TELL the OP to go to.a breed rescue. I said PLEASE look at breed rescues FIRST. If being a stickler for the exact choice of words is necessary, the only other word I can think of is to "consider" a dog from a breed rescue.

                                    I don't give a flip what the rest of the world actually does, it was merely a suggestion that was taken way out of context. "--please look ----first" is a long way from "I think you need to----"

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                                    • #19
                                      Originally posted by colorfan View Post

                                      I love the look of a Springer Spaniel, wondering if they are similar to a BC and need more stimulation than I can give.
                                      Wondering about an English setter, have never known one personally
                                      Springer Spaniel owner here! Our springer (and his litter mates) is really the ideal as far as energy. He is 100% the most active dog I have ever had. BUT you bring him in the house and the switch goes off and he turns into a snuggly lazy dog. He can go quite a few days of very minimal exercise without even seeming bothered. We live in a coastal area with lots of rain in the summers so some days our real "exercise" is limited to indoor play. He does need a lot of mental stimulation, he's wicked smart.

                                      Shedding is pretty minimal if you keep the coat maintained (FAR FAR less than our Lab!).


                                      I think a lot of the characteristics of most bird/gun dogs that you could perceive as negative are often times just from different lines, breeding, etc... Some gun dogs have fabulous "off switches" and some don't. Just like anything, do your research when looking for a breeder.

                                      Also, SS are just the cutest, pic of mine for evidence. Good luck!
                                      Click image for larger version  Name:	24296377_10210001730495613_7802697200094137868_n.jpg Views:	1 Size:	10.8 KB ID:	10397732


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                                      • #20
                                        OP, maybe it would help to make three lists (as if you were horse shopping) of 1: traits you REQUIRE in your next dog, 2: traits you WOULD LIKE in your next dog and 3: traits that are a HARD NO in your next dog.

                                        That should help sort out your choices.

                                        (If you're really over the hair, think carefully about Labs and Lab mixes. They are absolutely terrific, and I've had a bunch of them, but they are not so much dogs as hair ejection units. All the time, everywhere, hair hair HAIR!)

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