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China tariffs horse related

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  • China tariffs horse related



    On evening news one farmer said he's going to start growing hay.
    The cue card kid just held up an empty cue card. For a minute there I thought I had lost my sense of humor. --- Red Skelton

  • #2
    Hopefully wherever he’s at hasn’t been getting as much rain as the Mid-Atlantic has. Last year, the grass grew great but it was too wet to cut or cure it in time
    Leap, and the net will appear

    Comment


    • #3
      Not sure hay is very profitable. My neighbor has 125 cattle, and cuts hay for everyone on our street. He pays $100 per acre for fertilizer, plus employee costs. He is of retirement age, yet he still works the farm in blistering hot weather. Last year, it was difficult to harvest because of too much rain. Much of his crop went to the cows because it was harvested too wet. He would cut 50 acres and get rain.

      Farmers are going to be hurting. I expect people might lose their farms over this. All the farmers i know around here are retirement age. I don't see anyone volunteering to replace them. No one wants to go into farming. In the future, that farmland will be developed for houses. Already have one new housing development going in across from his property. Once this place becomes developed, i suspect i will be moving out.

      I'm not sure it is easy for farmers to switch crops. Buying an entire new set of equipment might be prohibitively expensive. What do you do with your old equipment? If everyone is in the same situation (leaving the market), the market value will drop on those items. You'll be lucky to sell even at rock bottom prices.

      "For harvesting 4-foot-by-5-foot round bales, estimated new equipment costs are $25,000 for a rotary mower/conditioner, $5,500 for a 10-foot rake, $35,000 for the baler and $55,000 for an adequate-sized tractor."
      --- Ouch!

      I don't think this trade war is good for anyone. I know that in this area the people who own the hay harvesters are in high demand because the smaller farms cannot afford that sort of equipment. The small farmers rely on the larger farms for their harvest... Add in climate change and shorter opportunities to harvest... Not good.




      ​​​​​​





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      • #4
        I feel confident that this will all settle down. China has been ripping us off for decades. Time to play fair. Of course, they don't like it and they're trying to bluff us back down.

        "Climate Change", formerly known as "Global Warming" is a GOOD thing for farming world wide. Longer growing seasons. Weather (you know, the climate -- it changes every three months or so) will always "change" -- some years you get lots of rain, then you gets drought. And you never get the rain exactly when you'd LIKE it to fall.

        Here in the Southwest, drought is more likely than too much rain. Even so, a farmer cuts his hay, and here comes a rainstorm to mess things up! So he bales that up for his cows or piuts it through a hay grinder and hopes for the best next cutting. Hay prices are high around here. I think the biggest expense is transport from where the hay is baled to the end user. You're damn lucky if it's a neighbor who provides your hay. You've cut out the transport costs.

        Farmers are gamblers. Always have been. I'd support a guy who wants to grow hay!

        Comment


        • #5
          I saw that same news broadcast and wondered if other soybean growers would switch to hay. We've been exporting alfalfa for a long time. These new tariffs take effect June 1st. The goal of reining in China is a good one. I'm not at all sure that tariffs are the way to do it.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by ThreeFigs View Post

            "Climate Change", formerly known as "Global Warming" is a GOOD thing for farming world wide.
            That is the stupidest thing I have heard/seen for a long time.
            ... _. ._ .._. .._

            Comment


            • #7
              Climate change in general seems to be leading to climate instability. It isn't a slow stable increase of average temperature everywhere. It's a disruption of weather patterns that can create larger and more frequent storms, more droughts, and also paradoxically worse winter storms because of how a warming artic distorts the polar vortex.

              In my region we have been experiencing somewhat hotter and drier summers that have created far worse forest fires over the past decade. These have certainly devastated a lot of farmers. For the first time, the actual city has been smoked out several years in a row, which never happened before.

              So while its true the weather has always been unpredictable everywhere, disrupted weather patterns are causing more catastrophic weather conditions in different ways in different places.

              Comment


              • #8
                I wonder if it will become more commonplace here to feed haylage? It is commonly feed in the UK due to the inability to cure hay due to rain.

                Comment


                • #9
                  More and more performance horse farms in Texas are feeding only cubes or pellets.
                  Only two emotions belong in the saddle: One is a sense of humor. The other is patience.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by ThreeFigs View Post
                    "Climate Change", formerly known as "Global Warming" is a GOOD thing for farming world wide. Longer growing seasons. Weather (you know, the climate -- it changes every three months or so) will always "change" -- some years you get lots of rain, then you gets drought. And you never get the rain exactly when you'd LIKE it to fall!
                    Climate science, research, and experts in the field of climate change disagree with your interpretation.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      I just went to my "local" good tack store today to order some BOT stuff before the tariffs hit.

                      The owner told me that her suppliers are warning her that all their prices are going to go UP, especially with the 25% tariff.

                      Fortunately for me the BOT people have not increased their prices yet (she called while I waited), but it is coming.

                      I was considering buying double bridle bits last year, and when I first heard of the steel tariffs I hurried up and saved my money. Now I have stainless steel double bridle bits (Weymouth curbs, single jointed eggbutt bradoons and french-link eggbutt bradoons) in many sizes since I ride lesson horses now. At least I am prepared now and can fit most sizes of horses with a double bridle, I did not get the giant sizes since I do not want to ride giant horses (BTDT).

                      Luckily I already have a decent bit collection, and I have the saddle, saddle pads and girths I need to fit most horses. It may get much more expensive to get gear for hunter-jumpers or dressage horses. I sincerely hope I am prepared with what I will need for the years ahead, and yes, I know, a horse will appear that will need something I don't already own, that is inevitable!

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by ThreeFigs View Post

                        Weather (you know, the climate -- it changes every three months or so) will always "change" -- some years you get lots of rain, then you gets drought. And you never get the rain exactly when you'd LIKE it to fall.
                        You might want to read this handy article on the difference between weather and climate. If the article is too long, here is a nice illustration to help.

                        https://www.ncei.noaa.gov/news/weather-vs-climate

                        "So relax! Let's have some fun out here! This game's fun, OK? Fun goddamnit." Crash Davis; Bull Durham

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by ThreeFigs View Post
                          Here in the Southwest, drought is more likely than too much rain. Even so, a farmer cuts his hay, and here comes a rainstorm to mess things up! So he bales that up for his cows or piuts it through a hay grinder and hopes for the best next cutting. Hay prices are high around here. I think the biggest expense is transport from where the hay is baled to the end user. You're damn lucky if it's a neighbor who provides your hay. You've cut out the transport costs.
                          I don't know where in the Desert Southwest you are, but hay is the Number Two agriculture production crop in Arizona, and has been for many years. The transport costs are not a big factor per bale here in the Phoenix metro area because it is grown and baled not far from here.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            That's nice for you, Silverbridge. Our grass hay mainlycomes from the mountains or the northern part of the state. Much of our hay gets sent to Texas or Oklahoma when they're in drought conditions. That raises our prices here. We do have irrigation in parts of Colorado, but most of our water flows OUT of here to states downstream. Yes, we have lots of irrigated alfalfa, but not every horse can eat alfalfa.

                            I will beg to differ with those of you who fear the Climate Apocalypse. The climate has changed over the centuries and over milennia. It has been hot before there were enough humans on the planet to affect "climate change" -- and they didn't have internal combusion engines anyway. There have been Ice Ages, too, without anyone around to blame. So give it a rest. Climate Change is based on faulty data and not on factual observation.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              NPR ran a story yesterday about farmers being affected by these new tariffs. They interviewed one farmer who said it takes at least a year to change the type of crop being grown—they can't change over quickly because of many factors. This particular guy said he was getting out of soybeans and giving hemp a try.
                              "Dogs give and give and give. Cats are the gift that keeps on grifting." —Bradley Trevor Greive

                              Comment


                              • #16
                                Originally posted by chestnutmarebeware View Post
                                This particular guy said he was getting out of soybeans and giving hemp a try.
                                here is the problem, few areas in the world can produce the quantity of grain crops as the central United States... in the short term sure China can refuse to buy the grains produced here but... once their citizens start becoming hungry, it is pretty hard to control a billion of so.There are just so many dogs they can eat.

                                Also their fall back position is suffering droughts

                                Soybeans closed higher on Friday as investors keep an eye on hot, dry weather in Brazil.
                                https://www.agriculture.com/markets/...ndamental-data

                                and their buddy has a problem also

                                https://www.reuters.com/article/us-r...-idUSKCN1J50HH
                                Not responsible for typographical errors.

                                Comment


                                • #17
                                  MissAriel, thanks so much for that oh-so-helpful illustration of weather vs.climate (not). Here in Colorado, it's not uncommon to need shorts and a parka within the space of 24 hours. In winter, I don't put all my summer clothes away. In summer, ditto the winter duds.

                                  I hope the guy who wants to try hemp has an abundance of water. Hemp needs a lot of it.

                                  Comment


                                  • #18
                                    Originally posted by ThreeFigs View Post

                                    I hope the guy who wants to try hemp has an abundance of water. Hemp needs a lot of it.
                                    I THINK he was in Virginia, so he should be ok. I also believe that Virginia is offering financial help to farmers wanting to try growing hemp, but I could be wrong about that.
                                    "Dogs give and give and give. Cats are the gift that keeps on grifting." —Bradley Trevor Greive

                                    Comment


                                    • #19
                                      Originally posted by ThreeFigs View Post
                                      That's nice for you, Silverbridge.
                                      Nice for me? I didn't mean to imply that hay is cheap here because it's grown not far away. It's still very expensive.

                                      I was saying that, the distance from the farm to consumer with regard many grown commodities is not always a major factor in setting market costs.

                                      Comment


                                      • #20
                                        Originally posted by ThreeFigs View Post
                                        MissAriel, thanks so much for that oh-so-helpful illustration of weather vs.climate (not). Here in Colorado, it's not uncommon to need shorts and a parka within the space of 24 hours. In winter, I don't put all my summer clothes away. In summer, ditto the winter duds.

                                        I hope the guy who wants to try hemp has an abundance of water. Hemp needs a lot of it.
                                        But the climate doesn’t change every three months here in Colorado. The seasons do, sure,and so do the temps but the climate stays a consistent semi-arid.

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