Stallion Spotlight

Sandro Hit Standa Eylers

Real Estate Spotlight

528KerwinHill-003-HDRInternet
  • Welcome to the Chronicle Forums.
    Please complete your profile. The forums and the rest of www.chronofhorse.com has single sign-in, so your log in information for one will automatically work for the other. Disclaimer: The opinions expressed here are the views of the individual and do not necessarily reflect the views and opinions of The Chronicle of the Horse.

Announcement

Collapse

Forum rules and no-advertising policy

As a participant on this forum, it is your responsibility to know and follow our rules. Please read this message in its entirety.

Board Rules

2. Conversations in horse-related forums should be horse-related.3. Keep conversations productive, on topic and civil.
Discussion and disagreement are inevitable and encouraged; personal insults, diatribes and sniping comments are unproductive and unacceptable. Whether a subject is light-hearted or serious, keep posts focused on the current topic and of general interest to other participants of that thread. Utilize the private message feature or personal email where appropriate to address side topics or personal issues not related to the topic at large.

4. No advertising in the discussion forums.classifieds site and through the purchase of banner ads. The tightly monitored Giveaways forum permits free listings of genuinely free horses and items available or wanted (on a limited basis). Items offered for trade are not allowed.

Advertising Policy Specifics
When in doubt of whether something you want to post constitutes advertising, please contact a moderator privately in advance for further clarification. Refer to the following points for general guidelines:

Board members may ask for suggestions on breeding stallion recommendations. Stallion owners may reply to such queries by suggesting their own stallions, only if their horse fits the specific criteria of the original poster. Excessive promotion of a stallion by its owner or related parties is not permitted and will be addressed at the discretion of the moderators.

Members may use the forums to ask for general recommendations of trainers, barns, shippers, farriers, etc., and other members may answer those requests by suggesting themselves or their company, if their services fulfill the specific criteria of the original post. Members may not solicit other members for business if it is not in response to a direct, genuine query.

While members may ask for general opinions and suggestions on equipment, trailers, trucks, etc., they may not list the specific attributes for which they are in the market, as such posts serve as wanted ads.

5. Do not post copyrighted photographs unless you have purchased that photo and have permission to do so.

6. Respect other members.7. We have the right to reproduce statements made in the forums.
The Chronicle of the Horse may copy, quote, link to or otherwise reproduce posts, or portions of posts, in print or online for advertising or editorial purposes, if attributed to their original authors, and by posting in this forum, you hereby grant to The Chronicle of the Horse a perpetual, non-exclusive license under copyright and other rights, to do so.

8. We reserve the right to enforce and amend the rules.Terms of Service and Privacy Policy for more information.

Thanks for being a part of the COTH forums!

(Revised 5/9/18)
See more
See less

Differences between $1000 horses and $10,000 horse

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • KBC
    started a topic Differences between $1000 horses and $10,000 horse

    Differences between $1000 horses and $10,000 horse

    Plants tongue firmly in cheek, while listing..

    I have up to the great age of topping 60, ridden a bunch of cheap horses, I have owned a bunch of cheap horses, I have bought low, sold a little higher....on most occasions, but definitely a bargain basement shopper.

    this year with my new knee, my last year with my coach, looking at an uncertain future, I took the plunge and bought a huge great...Well he is to me 16:3hh, TB, who can jump. Though I don’t, and is confirmed at second level. A horse I have secretly coveted for years, but never though I would own...and now I do...

    BUT

    i didn’t realize I would have to factor in his vet visit every month, ripped his eye lid, got an abscess in his cheek, that took two visits. Two lameness visits, because he can be an arse. Cheap horses only ever see the vet for annual check ups.

    I did not factor in, fussy eater, cheap horses eat happily, his lordship gets bored, and requires his food mixed, not just dumped in his bowl.

    Cheap horses I can throw out in the field, spoiled handsome man hangs around by the gate, hoping someone will take pity on him. This morning I bought him in for a lesson, his stall was open, he shot in and it was hard to get him out again.


    My cheap horses and I muddled through, kind of learning together, Mr Wonderful has all the bells and whistles installed, if you ask nicely, properly he will try his heart out. Don’t ask anything, he will drag himself around on his forehand, ask wrongly, shout instead of whisper, ring a bell when you should have been blowing a whistle and he has a mini melt down.

    I am sure there is more, but it is so worth it to be riding him, my new happy place is just riding around the arena, on the buckle end, grinning like an idiot, just enjoying that walk. Everything is fun, sometimes challenging, but he is such a good boy. The saddle fitter was here two weeks ago, as the last winter storm blew through, I was sicker than a sick thing, but couldn’t miss out on this. Having got him set up, she wanted to see me ride him, and we went into the indoor, the wind was howling, wet snow was pelting on the roof, the place was rattling, and I had not one qualm about hopping on and riding, As coach pointed out, with my last mare I would have had her ear puffs in, fly veil on, and probably both of us would have been dosed with a calmer.



    Click image for larger version

Name:	7BBC05B5-F052-417B-9C24-54CBB11E3B87.jpeg
Views:	1
Size:	12.6 KB
ID:	10391170

  • RedHorses
    replied

    Leave a comment:


  • KBC
    replied
    aredhel that is a very sound theory, it explains a lot.

    Leave a comment:


  • aredhel
    replied
    This is easily understood when you understand that equine prices are a gravitational phenomenon.

    Cheap horses are cheap because they have a very low gravitational field, so they can't pull much money out of your wallet, either at the time of purchase or later. That weak gravitational field also means they're far less adept at pulling dangerous objects and hostile animals into their immediate vicinity.

    The more expensive the horse, the stronger its gravitational field (as demonstrated by its initial purchase price). That strong gravitational field will continue to pull the money out of your wallet forever, and will attract every nail, loose bit of barbed wire, sharp hook, etc, into the horse's stall no matter how hard you attempt to keep these things away. It pulls loose clods of earth out of the pasture, creating holes for the horse to fracture its leg in, and it also attracts every cranky gelding and bitchy mare in its field of influence to come and be the horse's pasture mates. The stronger the gravitational field, the farther this effect extends (as equine gravity follows the inverse square law). FEI-level horses have fields so strong they can pull a nail from hundreds of miles away into their stall so they can step on it the night before the opening of the Olympic equestrian event the horse is scheduled to compete in.

    It's science, people!
    Last edited by aredhel; Jun. 14, 2019, 11:30 AM.

    Leave a comment:


  • xeroxchick
    replied
    When I was horse hunting about four years ago I went to see a plain paint steady Eddy who was about 15.2 and as sweet as could be, never been hunted but seemed like a trouper. He was $2500. The girl who owned him was concerned that I was driving an hour and wanted me to be sure I knew his price. He was awesome. The next horse I looked at was half Irish sport horse and $25000. Had one year hunting as a GUEST horse, so didn't have a steady ride to establish her career. Was also half Arab. The rep for the seller was very into trying to give me a riding lesson. Um, I'm walking on a loose rein for a reason. Passed. She was just not as good of a horse as the first. I ended up buying a horse from my friend but was sure to let the first person know how her horse was superior. Just as pretty. So in all, pricing horses is so very subjective and not quite an indicator of thier quality.

    Leave a comment:


  • x-halt-salute
    replied
    Originally posted by KBC View Post
    Plants tongue firmly in cheek, while listing..

    I have up to the great age of topping 60, ridden a bunch of cheap horses, I have owned a bunch of cheap horses, I have bought low, sold a little higher....on most occasions, but definitely a bargain basement shopper.

    this year with my new knee, my last year with my coach, looking at an uncertain future, I took the plunge and bought a huge great...Well he is to me 16:3hh, TB, who can jump. Though I don’t, and is confirmed at second level. A horse I have secretly coveted for years, but never though I would own...and now I do...

    BUT

    i didn’t realize I would have to factor in his vet visit every month, ripped his eye lid, got an abscess in his cheek, that took two visits. Two lameness visits, because he can be an arse. Cheap horses only ever see the vet for annual check ups.

    I did not factor in, fussy eater, cheap horses eat happily, his lordship gets bored, and requires his food mixed, not just dumped in his bowl.
    ...
    If it makes you feel any better, I've got a $0 horse who is enough of a frequent flyer at the nearest vet school that the students tend to know her long and sordid veterinary history long before they meet her. Who has adverse side-effects/reactions from just about everything, including and especially things meant to make her healthier. Who can be thrown out in a field ... if you want her to drop 100 lbs in the blink of an eye and become an anxious, ulcer-ridden mess. Who can be trusted under any circumstances ... to spook at ridiculous things. My no-nonsense rancher grandpa would say she's worth every penny I paid for her (also tongue firmly in cheek). But the truth is I'd do it all over again (tens of thousands of dollars in vet bills included) and I'm not positive that the more expensive horses that are likely to come into my life after will be able to measure up.

    Some horses are just worth the fuss.

    Leave a comment:


  • Arelle
    replied
    I have eight horses.

    The plain, kind of homely one will outlast the cockroaches during the apocalypse.

    The nicest one spends at least a week at the vet hospital once a year.


    Leave a comment:


  • KBC
    replied
    I arrived at the barn yesterday lunch time, to be greeted with

    ”Are you riding today? Your horse is going crazy....he doesn’t like this weather”

    I rode, he was good, then I took the suggestion and turned him back out in a light blanket. Everyone else is out, naked, it’s June, fly season has not taken off yet, we have been having a heatwave...one chilly day and His Wussyness wants his blankie........


    Leave a comment:


  • dani0303
    replied
    Meanwhile I think I have the lowest maintenance "expensive" horse ever.

    I bought her for a steal (because she's aged and quirky) but not too long ago she was a 6-figure horse. She spent a majority of her life in show barns that treated her like a queen. Now she lives on the plains of Colorado; outside 24/7 in a herd of 15 other mares. She never sees the inside of a stall. She only gets vaccines, 1x yearly hock injections (a small price to pay for her soundness), and plain front shoes.

    She's happy as can be. She LOVES her semi-feral, semi-show horse life and I imagine even though she's months away from 20 she'll still be sound and jumping for many more years.

    Leave a comment:


  • rockymouse
    replied
    Our son's gelding was a fancy, talented cutter in his day and he is a classy-looking dude. We acquired him from friends at a good price, though it was a small fortune for us. When we brought him home, my husband looked at him in awe and said 'This is the nicest thing we'll ever own." And he was right.

    But the multiple serious colics, the ulcers, the abscesses, the feet that must be shod all the way round, and years of a mystery lameness that has put him into retirement - all this has emptied buckets of money into our vet's college account for his kids. He's taught me a lot, I'll give him that, and over the years we've uncovered the solutions to the colics, the ulcers, the abscesses and, for the most part, the mystery lameness. But still. He's retired except for an occasional walk around the pasture. So much for the low-level cow work I'd dreamed of doing with him when our son left for college. He's the grumpy prince of our place and that's okay.

    My mare, however, was a pity buy, a true rescue situation. The sheriff had seized a group of horses from a hoarder who'd starved them; two of them died and the rest were shockingly poor. The surviving horses were vetted and brought back to relative health by the sheriff's office. I went to the sheriff's auction when they were sold. No one bid on what I thought was the nicest mare, so I raised my hand and said $50. My husband, bless his heart, did not bat an eye when I called to tell him I needed the trailer.

    I brought her home 14 years ago; she's now in the neighborhood of 30 years old. She looks half that. In her time with us, she's colicked very mildly twice (got into a new round bale both times and pigged out), stepped on a nail and lacerated an eyelid on a fence. And that's it!

    Leave a comment:


  • RainWeasley
    replied
    My first horse was $100. She was solid,. hardly ever had to see the vet, easy keeper, great brain, fun to ride.

    Second was an OTTB, a bit more, $800 plus $500 to get him shipped. He was amazing to ride, but I could.not.get.weight.on.him. I figured out the magic formula finally and it was something as a college kid I couldn't afford, so I found him a home with a girl who had the money and wanted a good eventer (he could jump the moon).

    Third horse was a dinky little project pony, paid $300 for him as an unbroken almost-3 year old. Literally the easiest horse I have ever had, lived on air, talented, born broke, could put kids on him and not worry a lick after one month of being under saddle. Too small for me though. He lives at a horse camp now and was leased out to a girl during the school year, competed Novice at the AECs (he's the pony with the Auburn tiger mascot on his back that was on EN).

    Fourth horse was another OTTB, about $1500 I think, most I had spent on a horse at that point. Cribber, skinny, skin issues, arthritis. Got him restarted and went to a pleasure home.

    Current horse the most I have paid, $2500. I love him to pieces, he has a fantastic brain. Not the best conformation. But within the first year and a half of owning him I have paid almost double his purchase price in random vet bills. I think he is worth it though!

    The super cheap ones were definitely the easiest ones I had as far as no injuries, easy care, low maintenance, best brains.

    Leave a comment:


  • bluepece2
    replied
    I have three, daughters 9k pony, my 15k horse and my 30k Horse (talking euro here).
    9k pony has coliced once since owning him and it was a quickly over thing.
    15k horse has had back injections, hoof wounds in the field resulting in total of 5 months (back and hoof) off of jumping and then the week of a show decided to run off with my saddle on fall over...cue huge legs the day after and days off of work. Yup, she was a bargain 😂😂
    so far the most expensive one has had a cough. I will knock on wood very hard after this as she has her first international show this month...

    Leave a comment:


  • KBC
    replied
    Originally posted by CanteringCarrot View Post

    Ain't that the truth. My horse has a huge crush on my vet...)

    whereas mine just tries to crush mine.....this written after a recent show:


    Mr Chuck, Chuckles, Chuckie.

    I needed to help some one with their horse yesterday, so handed Chuck off to the nearest person, went and did my good deed, came back to collect my good steed, and had to apologize!

    I had handed him off to a show mum, totally forgetting her other role in life,she is the VET, run Jaws music! The vet who sticks me, pokes me, BAD person.....so Chuck works out how much revenge he can get off with, settled on the sneaky, put hoof on half of foot, then slide it off, cue innocent look, “oh I’m sorry, was that your foot I was squashing?”

    Yes I believe it was deliberate!

    Sorry Dr Jess, we really do appreciate you!!



    Leave a comment:


  • HJdaydream
    replied
    KBC you are cracking me up! I FEEL YOU!!

    My horse in high school was previously my dad's heading & healing horse. Cost $2500 in the early 90's from a newspaper ad. I evented him through training level and showed dressage through 2nd. We won a TON (not to brag, we just did!). Never lame a day in his life. One small bout of ulcers and never any other issues. We still own him (he's 32!) and my mom still lightly trail rides him.

    Bought my first horse as an adult a few years ago. a 5 yr old Hanoverian gelding, 18 hands. We show in the hunters. He ripped his eyelid (in his perfectly safe stall) requiring sutures, got bit in the leg by something poisonous (spider or snake), which was a muli month ordeal and is still not quite the same, broke his splint bone in the pasture and required surgery, had another non-healing wound on his other leg, escaped form his stall and fell on asphalt, earning him sutures on his elbow and abrasions on all his legs and stifles.

    Ya.... I would agree that the fancier they are the more accident prone!

    Leave a comment:


  • CanteringCarrot
    replied
    Originally posted by sascha View Post

    They are smart. First year they are super careful because they don't want to be re-sold, retired, or put down. After we have proved ourselves worthy it's game on with the needing Jimmy Choos every 6 weeks, getting vet worthy lacerations on absolutely nothing, not feeling 100% I think I need to see my favourite doctor today, that wasn't my favourite doctor last time so I feel a little worse this week send the good one, etc.
    Ain't that the truth. My horse has a huge crush on my vet...or maybe his assistant even, and loves to see them. Said horse also knows he won't pass a PPE as long as he keeps up the shenanigans, so I'm stuck with him.

    Leave a comment:


  • sascha
    replied
    Originally posted by CanteringCarrot View Post

    Or, as in my case, 1st year is fine...but then the 2nd year comes and the horse gets comfortable, he decides to let his hair down, he figures he's earned a good reputation and can let loose...he then collects many many vet bills over the first half of his 2nd year. The honeymoon phase has clearly ended and now we're well into a somewhat bitter (me) marriage

    Maybe we can recover with counseling!
    They are smart. First year they are super careful because they don't want to be re-sold, retired, or put down. After we have proved ourselves worthy it's game on with the needing Jimmy Choos every 6 weeks, getting vet worthy lacerations on absolutely nothing, not feeling 100% I think I need to see my favourite doctor today, that wasn't my favourite doctor last time so I feel a little worse this week send the good one, etc.

    Leave a comment:


  • sascha
    replied
    Originally posted by KBC View Post
    Cheap horses only ever see the vet for annual check ups.

    Click image for larger version

Name:	7BBC05B5-F052-417B-9C24-54CBB11E3B87.jpeg
Views:	1
Size:	12.6 KB
ID:	10391170
    My horse is laughing so hard at this she is farting. OMG, she is farting BREAK OUT THE ULCER MEDS! She cost me nearly nothing. She sees her vet more often than I see the vet at work and there are between 75 and 100 animals at work. She has a dermatologist. Etc. I can't go on because I will cry. lol

    And she is the best horse in the world <3

    Leave a comment:


  • KBC
    replied
    Originally posted by RedHorses View Post
    You could subscribe to the theory that the first year of ownership the horse is testing your level of commitment with injuries and riding/behavior/tack challenges. If you "pass the tests" things will settle down after that.

    Ahhh, I love this thought...kind of like an adopted kid....will you still love me if?

    Then there’s the other side, last show we were at had a steward, she wanted to check his bit, he wasn’t on board with that. With a little patience we got the job done, and she offered him a cookie as a reward.....”not eating that”

    My friend took it and offered “NOT eating that”

    I took it and offered “Yummy cookie, and safe, thanks mum”

    Leave a comment:


  • CanteringCarrot
    replied
    Originally posted by RedHorses View Post
    You could subscribe to the theory that the first year of ownership the horse is testing your level of commitment with injuries and riding/behavior/tack challenges. If you "pass the tests" things will settle down after that.

    Or, as in my case, 1st year is fine...but then the 2nd year comes and the horse gets comfortable, he decides to let his hair down, he figures he's earned a good reputation and can let loose...he then collects many many vet bills over the first half of his 2nd year. The honeymoon phase has clearly ended and now we're well into a somewhat bitter (me) marriage

    Maybe we can recover with counseling!

    Leave a comment:


  • RedHorses
    replied
    You could subscribe to the theory that the first year of ownership the horse is testing your level of commitment with injuries and riding/behavior/tack challenges. If you "pass the tests" things will settle down after that.

    Leave a comment:

Working...
X