• Welcome to the Chronicle Forums.
    Please complete your profile. The forums and the rest of www.chronofhorse.com has single sign-in, so your log in information for one will automatically work for the other. Disclaimer: The opinions expressed here are the views of the individual and do not necessarily reflect the views and opinions of The Chronicle of the Horse.

Announcement

Collapse

Forum rules and no-advertising policy

As a participant on this forum, it is your responsibility to know and follow our rules. Please read this message in its entirety.

Board Rules

1. You’re responsible for what you say.
As outlined in Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act, The Chronicle of the Horse and its affiliates, as well Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd., the developers of vBulletin, are not legally responsible for statements made in the Forums.

This is a public forum viewed by a wide spectrum of people, so please be mindful of what you say and who might be reading it—details of personal disputes may be better handled privately. While posters are legally responsible for their statements, the moderators may in their discretion remove or edit posts, though are not legally obligated to do so, regardless of content.

Users have the ability to modify or delete their own messages after posting. Moderators generally will not delete posts, threads or accounts unless they have been alerted and have determined that a post, thread or user has violated the Forums’ policies. Moderators do not regularly independently monitor the Forums for such violations.

Profanity, outright vulgarity, blatant personal insults or otherwise inappropriate statements will not be tolerated and will be dealt with at the discretion of the moderators.

Users may provide their positive or negative experiences with or opinions of companies, products, individuals, etc.; however, accounts involving allegations of criminal behavior against named individuals or companies MUST be first-hand accounts and may NOT be made anonymously.

If a situation has been reported upon by a reputable news source or addressed by law enforcement or the legal system it is open for discussion, but if an individual wants to make their own claims of criminal behavior against a named party in the course of that discussion, they too must identify themselves by first and last name and the account must be first-person.

Criminal allegations that do not satisfy these requirements, when brought to our attention, may be removed pending satisfaction of these criteria, and we reserve the right to err on the side of caution when making these determinations.

Credible threats of suicide will be reported to the police along with identifying user information at our disposal, in addition to referring the user to suicide helpline resources such as 1-800-SUICIDE or 1-800-273-TALK.

2. Conversations in horse-related forums should be horse-related.
The forums are a wonderful source of information and support for members of the horse community. While it’s understandably tempting to share information or search for input on other topics upon which members might have a similar level of knowledge, members must maintain the focus on horses.

3. Keep conversations productive, on topic and civil.
Discussion and disagreement are inevitable and encouraged; personal insults, diatribes and sniping comments are unproductive and unacceptable. Whether a subject is light-hearted or serious, keep posts focused on the current topic and of general interest to other participants of that thread. Utilize the private message feature or personal email where appropriate to address side topics or personal issues not related to the topic at large.

4. No advertising in the discussion forums.
Posts in the discussion forums directly or indirectly advertising horses, jobs, items or services for sale or wanted will be removed at the discretion of the moderators. Use of the private messaging feature or email addresses obtained through users’ profiles for unsolicited advertising is not permitted.

Company representatives may participate in discussions and answer questions about their products or services, or suggest their products on recent threads if they fulfill the criteria of a query. False "testimonials" provided by company affiliates posing as general consumers are not appropriate, and self-promotion of sales, ad campaigns, etc. through the discussion forums is not allowed.

Paid advertising is available on our classifieds site and through the purchase of banner ads. The tightly monitored Giveaways forum permits free listings of genuinely free horses and items available or wanted (on a limited basis). Items offered for trade are not allowed.

Advertising Policy Specifics
When in doubt of whether something you want to post constitutes advertising, please contact a moderator privately in advance for further clarification. Refer to the following points for general guidelines:

Horses – Only general discussion about the buying, leasing, selling and pricing of horses is permitted. If the post contains, or links to, the type of specific information typically found in a sales or wanted ad, and it’s related to a horse for sale, regardless of who’s selling it, it doesn’t belong in the discussion forums.

Stallions – Board members may ask for suggestions on breeding stallion recommendations. Stallion owners may reply to such queries by suggesting their own stallions, only if their horse fits the specific criteria of the original poster. Excessive promotion of a stallion by its owner or related parties is not permitted and will be addressed at the discretion of the moderators.

Services – Members may use the forums to ask for general recommendations of trainers, barns, shippers, farriers, etc., and other members may answer those requests by suggesting themselves or their company, if their services fulfill the specific criteria of the original post. Members may not solicit other members for business if it is not in response to a direct, genuine query.

Products – While members may ask for general opinions and suggestions on equipment, trailers, trucks, etc., they may not list the specific attributes for which they are in the market, as such posts serve as wanted ads.

Event Announcements – Members may post one notification of an upcoming event that may be of interest to fellow members, if the original poster does not benefit financially from the event. Such threads may not be “bumped” excessively. Premium members may post their own notices in the Event Announcements forum.

Charities/Rescues – Announcements for charitable or fundraising events can only be made for 501(c)(3) tax-exempt organizations. Special exceptions may be made, at the moderators’ discretion and direction, for board-related events or fundraising activities in extraordinary circumstances.

Occasional posts regarding horses available for adoption through IRS-registered horse rescue or placement programs are permitted in the appropriate forums, but these threads may be limited at the discretion of the moderators. Individuals may not advertise or make announcements for horses in need of rescue, placement or adoption unless the horse is available through a recognized rescue or placement agency or government-run entity or the thread fits the criteria for and is located in the Giveaways forum.

5. Do not post copyrighted photographs unless you have purchased that photo and have permission to do so.

6. Respect other members.
As members are often passionate about their beliefs and intentions can easily be misinterpreted in this type of environment, try to explore or resolve the inevitable disagreements that arise in the course of threads calmly and rationally.

If you see a post that you feel violates the rules of the board, please click the “alert” button (exclamation point inside of a triangle) in the bottom left corner of the post, which will alert ONLY the moderators to the post in question. They will then take whatever action, or no action, as deemed appropriate for the situation at their discretion. Do not air grievances regarding other posters or the moderators in the discussion forums.

Please be advised that adding another user to your “Ignore” list via your User Control Panel can be a useful tactic, which blocks posts and private messages by members whose commentary you’d rather avoid reading.

7. We have the right to reproduce statements made in the forums.
The Chronicle of the Horse may copy, quote, link to or otherwise reproduce posts, or portions of posts, in print or online for advertising or editorial purposes, if attributed to their original authors, and by posting in this forum, you hereby grant to The Chronicle of the Horse a perpetual, non-exclusive license under copyright and other rights, to do so.

8. We reserve the right to enforce and amend the rules.
The moderators may delete, edit, move or close any post or thread at any time, or refrain from doing any of the foregoing, in their discretion, and may suspend or revoke a user’s membership privileges at any time to maintain adherence to the rules and the general spirit of the forum. These rules may be amended at any time to address the current needs of the board.

Please see our full Terms of Service and Privacy Policy for more information.

Thanks for being a part of the COTH forums!

(Revised 5/9/18)
See more
See less

Should I sell my horse??

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #41
    Originally posted by rosie123 View Post


    Yes I'm a junior and this is actually my third horse (I've been riding since I was 9). His papers that we received when we bought him clearly state that he has had injuries from racing.
    1 - what happened to horses 1 and 2?

    2 - if you bought a horse knowing it had injuries and "gave it a go" and are now giving up, what makes you think someone else won't do better?
    "I am but a passenger on this ship"
    -- Stendal (epitaph)

    Comment

    • Original Poster

      #42
      Originally posted by findeight View Post

      Child, you don’t know that. Cousins could get sick, divorce, go broke, lose the farm or even die just like anybody else. You can’t say you know this can happen to other buyers and then say cousin will be happy to keep him the rest of his life, which could easily be 10 years or more. Have aunt and uncle seriously agreed to it?You don’t know and neither do they.
      People,, especially family, say they’ll always help you out and they usually do try...until you need them to and then the reality of what you were counting on them for takes over.

      We had one poster a few years back who assumed an older relative would retire her horse. When she called to say she was bringing it out, she was told they were about to close on the sale of the farm and moving for health and financial reasons.. Disaster for her carefully planned out retirement scenario. No plan B in place either. Can’t recall how that ended.
      I know this, but what can you do? This could happen to anyone if they sell their horse!

      Comment

      • Original Poster

        #43
        [QUOTE=SnortyPants;n10311164]
        Originally posted by rosie123 View Post

        Regardless of what you and your trainer think this horse can/can’t do, the biggest piece of advice I have for you is to keep any talk of buying a new horse SEPARATE from selling this one. If your trainer seems enthusiastic about dumping this one and getting something fancy, I would seek out someone else for buying. And if I were uni-bound in 2 years, I’d really think twice about getting another horse.

        You said you love this horse so my answer is to do right by him and not sell him. Still not sure why you can’t lease him out but your parents should be encouraged to think about this. Even free leasing can lead to a sale, or in this horse’s case, hopefully a soft landing with someone who will maintain him and retire him when the time comes.

        In the meantime, catch rides where you can. I put out a Craig’s list ad for catch rides when I moved to a new town and I was inundated with offers from busy/overhorsed rich people. If you have any talent and a measure of bravery, you can seek out more exciting rides, and maybe even make some money doing it.

        I agree that leasing is a good option, but my parents still don't want to have another horse to think about at the back of their head, and it is them who are the ones doing most of the paying for him so I can't really argue.

        Thanks for your advice

        Comment

        • Original Poster

          #44
          Originally posted by candyappy View Post
          If you want to do a discipline and your horse cannot physically do that, then you have basically 2 options.

          1. Sell him to someone who wants to do the type of riding he excels in. Buy a horse who can do what you want to do.

          2. Keep him forever (out of guilt and fear) and buy another horse sometime in the distant future when you can afford to own more than 1.


          It doesn't mean you dump him on the first person with money in hand. You wait for a person who is a good fit for him and that will give you a good chance at him finding a good caring owner and having a good life doing something he is suited for.

          This whole guilt trip about keeping a horse you have bought forever is morphing out of control and is not rational. I do agree that horses can end up in a bad place . I wouldn't want my horse to come to a bad end any more than the next person. I have land though, and can retire mine if I choose.

          The reality is many people have horses so they can ride. There is no shame in selling a well trained and sound 17 year old horse to buy one to suit your needs.
          Yes I absolutely agree. I am leaning towards keeping him and maybe sending him to a recommended dressage training place where they work on horses in dressage for a certain period of time (say a month or so) but it might be a bit costly and I'm not sure how well it'll go :/

          Comment

          • Original Poster

            #45
            Originally posted by emipou View Post
            This thread is a little frustrating to read, because I get the strong feeling that the OP doesn't really want anyone's opinion or idea on the matter. OP is going to shoot everything down anyway. So why waste the energy?

            If this is your third horse, and you have a "bond" with said horse, then do right by it and think about it's welfare above your desire to "move up a level". Some of these comments, OP sounds like she's talking about shoes. These are living being. They feel, they suffer.
            I did ask for peoples opinions, otherwise why would I even bother making this thread or replying to answers? I'm not trying to shoot down anything, and if you think I am, well I'm sorry you feel that way. I'm just trying to explain my situation so people understand what I'm trying to say.

            Comment

            • Original Poster

              #46
              Originally posted by emipou View Post

              1 - what happened to horses 1 and 2?

              2 - if you bought a horse knowing it had injuries and "gave it a go" and are now giving up, what makes you think someone else won't do better?
              1. If you really want to know, I grew out of my first pony (as in I got way to tall for her so it would be almost cruel to ride her) and my second horse had a freak accident and broke his leg in his paddock so he had to be put down.

              2. I'm not giving up. I don't see how you can say that I just "gave it a go" and I'm "giving up" because you have no clue about what we've been through and what we've achieved. I'm just thinking that someone else might want to focus more on the discipline that he is really good at, which is showjumping and might not be interested in dressage at all!

              Comment


              • #47
                It bears repeating that there are fates worse than death. No home is guaranteed forever unless it's your home. I'm no Vet, but I would strongly disagree with your vet saying that there was no sign of the injuries getting worse or turning into problems in the future. Arthritis at the very least is a very real potential for any old injury to be affected by as they age.

                Comment


                • #48
                  OP, count me as one of your confused readers. I don't see how this horse can be successful as a jumper, and not be able to collect or bend. I have a feeling that your gelding is very capable at the level you are currently riding at, but perhaps you have GP stars in your eyes and you know he won't ever get beyond the lower levels.

                  If he is as physically limited as you think he is, he really doesn't have much value. You might be able to give him away. If you wait another two or three years, given everything you have said, you won't even be able to give him away. I am assuming that the "papers" you mentioned that state he had an injury that is believed to limit his physical ability are some kind of vet record. What does this record say, exactly? Knowing the actual history would be helpful in getting an idea of how useful this horse can be to anyone.

                  I understand where your parents are coming from regarding a lease. You can end up with a flake who walks away a month after you purchase a second horse. There would be a certain amount of time where you would have two horses on the bill statement, assuming that another lease could be established for this gelding.

                  You are a young person, I am thinking about 14 years old? Maybe 15? You're taking a lesson a week and feel like you're not progressing. Maybe you could try increasing your lessons and see if there is improvement? or maybe try a different trainer. I have experience with staying with the wrong instructor for too long. I didn't progress at all. Then I tried a different instructor and made big improvements. I would be hesitant to listen to any instructor that has you in one lesson a week and is blaming the horse's physical limitations on your lack of progression. I just don't think you have the experience to fill in on the rides you get in independently during the week.

                  if your cousins have a farm, and you are intent on getting a fancier horse, retire your gelding to their farm. Pay for his general retirement maintenance, which should be cheaper than your current board, and move on to a second riding horse. Or be prepared to put a lot of effort into finding him a new home. And time. It could take months and months to find him a home. And you would need to keep riding him during that time, if you were looking to place him in a riding home.

                  Horses aren't easy when you have budget limitations. That is for sure!
                  Sheilah

                  Comment


                  • #49
                    Originally posted by rosie123 View Post

                    1. If you really want to know, I grew out of my first pony (as in I got way to tall for her so it would be almost cruel to ride her) and my second horse had a freak accident and broke his leg in his paddock so he had to be put down.

                    2. I'm not giving up. I don't see how you can say that I just "gave it a go" and I'm "giving up" because you have no clue about what we've been through and what we've achieved. I'm just thinking that someone else might want to focus more on the discipline that he is really good at, which is showjumping and might not be interested in dressage at all!
                    Out of curiosity, do you have any video of horse going in dressage work? None of us know your trainer or your training situation from the ground, but a video might help to identify something else at play.
                    Basically, I'm agreeing with many of the responses others are having that this doesn't all add up.
                    "I am but a passenger on this ship"
                    -- Stendal (epitaph)

                    Comment


                    • #50
                      Is anyone else really not buying this whole "injury" thing?

                      Not that I do not believe the OP in that the horse came with some physical baggage from his racing days, or has some old injuries...but I find it extremely hard to believe that the horse has injuries as described and that it translates to "the horse cannot bend or collect".

                      What I DO think is likely is that we have a young rider who doesn't know any better and does not possess the skills to help teach the horse to soften up, and jumping trainers who clearly are perfectly fine with the horse going through life crooked, hollow and turning like Harley Davidson. And probably "dressage" trainers who likewise don't really know how to truly get a horse soft and supple - they are a dime a dozen.

                      OP - a horse that gets around the jump course as you describe your gelding does is not a good jumper. It's a jumper that is begging for a soft tissue injury because the way he is moving is the opposite of how he should. Count me as another that would like to see a video of this horse moving or a better description of exactly what the injuries were.
                      Do not spoil what you have by desiring what you have not. Remember that what you have now was once among the many things that you only hoped for.

                      Comment


                      • #51
                        Hi Op,
                        I'm going to try and put myself in your shoes. You have a 17 yr old horse that you've owned for 2 years and that probably has limited capacity in ANY discipline, other than maybe some gentle ring work, x-rails, trail riding etc.., due to an old injury (my interpretation).

                        ..." he has a old racing injury which prevents him from being able to bend correcting and use his neck muscles properly which doesn't effect anything, but our dressage..."

                        This is a contrary and illogical statement but I understand that you believe it because you've been told this by trusted sources. To me there are two possible scenarios going on here;

                        1. Either the horse's old injury is the true reason he cannot 'bend correctly and use his neck muscles', in which case he also shouldn't be asked to jump.

                        2. Or, like many horses not schooled properly on the flat, he is not progressing because of some ingrained bad habits that you and your coach are unable to fix.

                        From the limited info you've given I would lean towards scenario (1.). Even so, if this were my horse I might ride with one or two other excellent dressage coaches and get second and third opinions. I would do this because as others have said, this horse may have the capacity to help you learn a lot about good dressage training, which would also give him a chance to continue to be your partner until university.

                        If otoh this fellow is truly uncomfortable with even mildly stepping up the flat work then it would be absolutely unfair to try and pass him off to another home as a 'jumper'. You have a huge responsibility to this 17 year old horse and that is why you are posting here so kudos to you!

                        The best situation you have presented so far for him is the cousins on the farm. Would your parents agree to a free lease there, as they are family?

                        For his sake, it's so important to sort out the facts of your horse's case from the 'questionable storylines' that follow him. I'm not saying this to be rude. Every horse comes with stories and 'truths' as they move from home to home. We aren't talking about a horse in his prime here. At his age he is extremely vulnerable and that would be first and foremost in my mind while I tried to figure out what to do.

                        Comment


                        • #52
                          Originally posted by rosie123 View Post

                          I did ask for peoples opinions, otherwise why would I even bother making this thread or replying to answers? I'm not trying to shoot down anything, and if you think I am, well I'm sorry you feel that way. I'm just trying to explain my situation so people understand what I'm trying to say.
                          The problem here is that most of us are adults. We understand what you're trying to say - you have a horse that you have outgrown his talent and you want a different one. But your parents are not willing to be on the hook for 2 horses and don't think the first one needs to be sold. It's not a unique story. Most of us own that horse, or have at one time.

                          There isn't much anyone here can say. A lot of us might side with your parents. Horses and riding are expensive and until you're the one paying for them on top of a mortgage, car payments, college savings, etc., it's really hard to appreciate how expensive they are.

                          At your age (not sure....16-17?) the prospect of getting a new horse brings up other issues - what will you do with it if you go to college? Can you bring it? How will you pay for it? Will you even ride it - in which case, why would they buy a horse now, especially when you have one that is rideable?

                          I didn't start riding until I was 33, so I don't have a ton of empathy for a teenager that wants to upgrade. I get it, but I don't feel any overwhelming feelings that you're getting a raw deal. If you are a very talented rider and you have a really good trainer and are showing in a competitive way - this kind of conversation should have already been had with your parents. If you are a casual or intermediate rider like I am, I will side with your parents on this one.

                          I think the others on this thread have some good comments - and I agree that when I read your first post I questioned how your horse could be a talented jumper and unable to perform dressage. I would really suggest that you ask for some riding or conformational critiques and see if you get some good feedback. And I think it's important that you think *critically* about your horse, your trainer and your training -- is it the horse? Is it you? Is it the trainer?

                          Comment


                          • #53
                            Everything Candypappy saif. In spade.

                            Originally posted by candyappy View Post
                            If you want to do a discipline and your horse cannot physically do that, then you have basically 2 options.

                            1. Sell him to someone who wants to do the type of riding he excels in. Buy a horse who can do what you want to do.

                            2. Keep him forever (out of guilt and fear) and buy another horse sometime in the distant future when you can afford to own more than 1.
                            Please OP, don’t fall for that.

                            And shame on those pretending you are not doing what’s right for this horse.
                            The number of horses you previously had before, the reasons you no longer have them, the type of goals you have and your/your trainers skills have nothing to do with this.

                            You are actually thinking ahead and trying to plan a good outcome for this horse.

                            You will have to sell your horse and to me, it’s better to sell him now at 17 so that it can find a place where it’ll be usefull than wait last minute when it’s older.

                            It doesn't mean you dump him on the first person with money in hand. You wait for a person who is a good fit for him and that will give you a good chance at him finding a good caring owner and having a good life doing something he is suited for.
                            Be very specific as to what your horse can and cannot do. Mention what you envision for your horse’s future. what it could/shouldn’t do and for how long.
                            It will give prospective buyers a better idea of the situation.
                            Ex : You expect your horse in the .90 jumper ring for the next 2-3 years, schooling on the flat 3 times per week and 2 times jumping... after that, slowing down a little.


                            This whole guilt trip about keeping a horse you have bought forever is morphing out of control and is not rational. I do agree that horses can end up in a bad place . I wouldn't want my horse to come to a bad end any more than the next person. I have land though, and can retire mine if I choose.

                            The reality is many people have horses so they can ride. There is no shame in selling a well trained and sound 17 year old horse to buy one to suit your needs.
                            To me, it sounds this horse could very well suit some low level program. The more advance of the students could surely enjoy flatting and jumping at .90/1m on a little more quirky experienced horse.
                            The less advanced kids could do the ups and down lessons on the flat.
                            A next to free experienced horse can be a blessing for a lots of riding school and NO, they don’t all send them to the kill pen when they’re done with their older schoolies.

                            Also, regarding disciplines, jumping is easier on the body and joints than dressage. A horse doesn’t need collection and/or much connection to go around a 1m course. It doesn’t need much bending either and can drift away and still be in the ribbons.
                            Lots of schoolies enjoy being ridden on the buckle a little inverted over hunter or little jumper courses.
                            At that level, it really just has to jump the jumps.
                            ~ Enjoying some guac and boxed wine at the Blue Saddle inn. ~

                            Originally posted by LauraKY
                            I'm sorry, but this has "eau de hoarder" smell all over it.
                            HORSING mobile training app

                            Comment

                            Working...
                            X