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How early to arrive to view a horse. - spin off

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  • How early to arrive to view a horse. - spin off

    While I agree with arriving early to view a horse you are thinking of buying, I see in another thread the suggestion of arriving an hour early.....

    When I was selling horses from home here, I may not have even been here an hour before you were due.....I don’t want strangers poking around my yard waiting for me.

    The last few horses I sold my trainer handled for me....she is a busy lady, I hate it, and it has happened that lessons have run late, and someone has arrived early, and everyone gets a little pressured.

    I really understand as a buyer wanting to make sure nothing is going on, and checking up, but from the other side people turning up an hour early are a pain....


    Thoughts?
    "He's not even a good pathological liar." Mara

    Practicing Member of the Not too Klassy for Boxed Wine Clique

  • #2
    I think it's rude to show up super early. We do foster care and make appointments for people to come meet their potential pets. People that come even 15 minutes early create an inconvenience and they're just coming to our home, let alone meeting us elsewhere. Appointment times are appointment times for a reason and I don't know of any horse professional, at any level, that would be cool with visitors showing up a half hour, let alone full hour, early to a scheduled appointment. That puts them in an awkward position and it's rude.

    Comment


    • #3
      I'm not going to buy a horse from a situation in which I'm the slightest bit uncomfortable. I've got instincts for a reason, and there's always another horse out there, so no reason to get stars in my eyes. And if they have a problem with my vet pulling blood or having two separate vets do a ppe, well. . .

      Comment

      • Original Poster

        #4
        Originally posted by tinah View Post
        I'm not going to buy a horse from a situation in which I'm the slightest bit uncomfortable. I've got instincts for a reason, and there's always another horse out there, so no reason to get stars in my eyes. And if they have a problem with my vet pulling blood or having two separate vets do a ppe, well. . .
        So your answer is? I get the rest of it but not sure how early you feel is OK?
        "He's not even a good pathological liar." Mara

        Practicing Member of the Not too Klassy for Boxed Wine Clique

        Comment


        • #5
          The hour early thing is if you figure they are going to be longing and doping the horse before you arrive.

          Perhaps the solution is to say I'd like to see him in the field and watch you tack up.

          Or to just do the appointment as scheduled and look for warning signs.

          If you are serious about the horse do a second test ride. Request to be part of the grooming and tracking and schedule your vet to draw blood at the end of that ride. But does that makes sense, a PPE right after a test ride?

          I can see for many modern horse sellers running on tight schedules that having a buyer turn up an hour early would be crazy and they wouldn't want you lurking about while they were driving home from work and the house was empty.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by KBC View Post
            I really understand as a buyer wanting to make sure nothing is going on, and checking up, but from the other side people turning up an hour early are a pain....


            Thoughts?
            In my experience, most everyone that is intentionally:
            1) doping the horse up,
            2) lunging it to death,
            3) riding the piss out of it beforehand,
            4) doing anything that a buyer might consider nefarious, or
            5) trying to hide something from you,

            is going to do it well in advance of the hour before your arrival. And is also going to brush or bathe away any evidence of having done so. I've worked in sales barns - never any so sketchy that they were actually drugging horses, but I've seen plenty of "taking the edge off" with lunging or chasing around the arena - always at least a couple hours before an appointment. Or an AM ride on a horse to be shown to a buyer in the afternoon.

            I've had a few people show up an hour early and claim they "miscalculated" the travel time. I consider it to be mildly rude, and frankly, a bit of a liability to have someone traipsing around without being escorted, whether it's my property or a boarding facility. Fortunately, I don't sell a lot of horses anymore and even when I did, had nothing to hide.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by blitzkrieg View Post
              I think it's rude to show up super early. We do foster care and make appointments for people to come meet their potential pets. People that come even 15 minutes early create an inconvenience and they're just coming to our home, let alone meeting us elsewhere. Appointment times are appointment times for a reason and I don't know of any horse professional, at any level, that would be cool with visitors showing up a half hour, let alone full hour, early to a scheduled appointment. That puts them in an awkward position and it's rude.
              I'm going to disagree. Horse selling is one of THE least regulated markets in the U.S. If you never had anyone try and cheat you then you've lived a charmed life. I learned that an early arrival can uncover a multitude of sins.

              As for preparing the horse more than an hour early, maybe so and maybe not. But even if they start before you get there they may still be in the process when you arrive.

              Certainly ask to see the horse brought from the field if that's important (and to me it would be). But I also want to see it come out of the stall and handled.

              I would not enter an empty barn but I would wait in the drive. That is neither rude nor anything but careful.

              Since no one commented on other parts then I'll take that as approval for the rest.

              G.

              P.S. The entire scenario I recommend presumes that you are dealing with a stranger or a person of whom you are not sure. If you are dealing with a known "square shooter" then you might not even need to bring help along. All you'll need is your check book!!!
              Mangalarga Marchador: Uma Raça, Uma Paixão

              Comment


              • #8
                People who are going to dope a horse to keep it quiet will likely do so long before the rider shows up to try the horse. That kind of situation can be dealt with in a straightforward way through drug testing if necessary. That is, have a vet pull blood, hold it for up to 30 days and do testing sometime before then. In that case, showing up early, whether it is 15 min. or an hour likely won't make a difference.

                It can be harder to protect yourself in a case where the seller is working their horse hard before you try it. You can't pull blood to find out if the seller was doing that. All you can do is show up early to see if the horse is in the field, in the stall, or being worked before you get there.

                Showing up 15-20 min. early is an easy way to see if the seller is doing anything with the horse right before they think you were going to show up. I don't think that is an unreasonable amount of time to show up early. Many people show up early to appointments because:

                1) They wanted to account for possible traffic but didn't find any
                2) They had a long drive and want to have some time to change shoes, boots, etc. If I have to drive several hours to see a horse, I might wear my breeches, but I will wear comfortable shoes, not my tall boots or paddock boots.

                I'm sure there are other reasons.

                I think an hour early would be too much.


                the suggestion to see the horse being brought in from the field and tacked up, etc. I think can be one way around the problem. However, the seller could still decide to work the horse first then toss it back out before you get there.

                In order to get a transaction done, I think buyers and sellers have to realize that the process of trying a horse is going to come with some inconveniences on both sides.

                Had I not shown up early to that one appointment, I may not have seen what the seller was doing...









                Comment


                • #9
                  I think 5-15 minutes early at the very most. I don't know who goes around advising people to arrive early--an hour is absolutely ridiculous. As a seller, that would be extremely irritating. People are busy these days, myself included. I might be with the vet or farrier or trying to have an uninterrupted ride on another horse or not quite back from an appointment elsewhere.

                  A friend recently had her horse up for sale and made an appointment with a prospective buyer. She arrived at the barn about 30 minutes early to groom the horse, set out tack, etc. and found the prospective buyer--a TOTAL STRANGER--in her horse's stall fooling with it. Personally, I would have had a hard time holding my temper in that situation. A sales appointment does NOT give you the right to trespass on someone else's property or handle their horse without them present. My friend kept her temper, but ended up point blank refusing to sell the horse to this person. She felt that this person's behavior indicated that they were shady. It was quite a nice horse and sold very quickly thereafter to another party.

                  I recognize that most prospective buyers wouldn't have the gall to trespass like that, exactly, but I would definitely be put off to arrive at the barn to show a horse and find the prospective buyer there quizzing my staff, etc, forcing us to rush to get ready to show the horse or interrupt other activities/work. It definitely would start the sales appointment off on the wrong foot.

                  And honestly, in this day and time, there simply is no excuse for not calling or texting if you are going to be early (or late) to a sales appointment. Additionally, if someone requested to begin the sales appointment by seeing the horse being caught, brought in from the field and groomed, that's very easy for most sellers to arrange.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    When I went to try the horse I own now I was an hour early, but I had called the girl selling him and gave her a bit of a heads up. I was driving 3 hours, over a few different highways, and wasn’t sure if I’d hit traffic multiple times. Turned out I hit zero traffic and made excellent time. I offered to go sit in a local Tim Horton’s for an hour but the seller was ready for me anyways. I hate to say I was ‘that’ person that was an hour early but I wanted to give myself some buffer time - wouldn’t you prefer a buyer that’s early instead of late?

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      I have never shown up earlier than 15 minutes, and I will patiently wait (in my vehicle) if the owner is not there to greet me. I ask for the owner to show me everything from the horse being caught, groomed, tacked up, etc. But I also have purchased quite a few horses over the years and have a lot of experience to typically know if something is off. I would never dream of showing up an hour early. As for selling a horse, I let the person know that I will be there at x time, and that if they get there first to please wait in their vehicle. I have nothing to hide and PREFER the buyer to see both the good AND bad from the ground up. But again, a lot of horse sellers are not as honest

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        I think the blood draw is way more important than arriving early. As a previous poster wrote, any bad stuff will happen well in advance so an hour early won’t help much if you are suspicious.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          I think arriving a hour early would be obnoxious. And if you have your trainer with you I doubt they would agree to it, as it would not make them look very good.
                          http://trainingcupid.blogspot.com/

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            If something shady really is going on with a horse, showing up an hour early probably won't be very revealing. It's just being rude. If someone showed up an hour early to view a horse, I'd make them wait.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              What you did sounds totally reasonable! You left early to avoid traffic and then let the seller know that you didn't hit any. You then left it up to her to decide what to do.

                              Sounds like it worked out

                              Originally posted by c0608524 View Post
                              When I went to try the horse I own now I was an hour early, but I had called the girl selling him and gave her a bit of a heads up. I was driving 3 hours, over a few different highways, and wasn’t sure if I’d hit traffic multiple times. Turned out I hit zero traffic and made excellent time. I offered to go sit in a local Tim Horton’s for an hour but the seller was ready for me anyways. I hate to say I was ‘that’ person that was an hour early but I wanted to give myself some buffer time - wouldn’t you prefer a buyer that’s early instead of late?

                              Comment


                              • #16
                                I am always early because I hate being late and even I think showing up an hour early as a surprise attack is rude.
                                Just as rude as showing up an hour late and expecting the seller to still be available to show you the horse.

                                My general rule of thumb for appointments is 10 minutes is OK anything more than that I drive around (or sit in some parking lot) until the 10 minute mark.

                                Comment


                                • #17
                                  I agree with 10 -15 minutes early is good.

                                  If the seller doesn't live on the property, they likely won't even be there. I has someone going to meet me so could show a horse and they showed up way earlier. They disturbed the barn owner who had to call me. It was all rather rude.
                                  https://fearlessriderreturns.blogspot.com/

                                  Comment


                                  • #18
                                    If you are that early unintentionally, the polite thing to do is to stay in your car, in the parking lot. You do not simply go wandering around the property unannounced.
                                    No matter where you go, there you are

                                    Comment


                                    • #19
                                      I've been one of those annoyingly early people, I suppose. Not because of trying to catch a seller out, but because with traffic and distances involved, you can't always judge driving time correctly. If it works out, we'll stop somewhere and kill time, but sometimes these places you are going are out in the sticks so far, there aren't any public places to stop, so you just have to show up, apologize, and wait. It is especially hard to figure timing when you are on a road trip to see multiple horses in a remote (to you) area, so I usually prefer giving a window of time and then text/call with updates as we go along (when sellers are ok with that).

                                      As a seller, I have had people show up super early and that was ok -- just felt bad for them that they had to wait for my trainer to arrive to show the horse but I wouldn't have called them "rude" -- or so late that I'd sent the trainer home and had to call him back. But when people are coming 3 or 4 hours to see my horse, and knowing how crazy bad traffic can be, I try to be understanding.


                                      Comment


                                      • #20
                                        I arrive early, usually an hour early. I get to see the horse before it is tacked up. If it is being brought from someplace else, I am waiting when it gets off the trailer. I can tell a lot by doing this. The only people who don't like this are those who have lied about height of the horse or some other important factor. I once arrived at a place west of Atlanta where a Canadian said she had a son of Mr. Prospector over 16 hands. I got there early, and saw 3 broodmares, skinny, standing in deep mud, no hay, no shelter, with rain rot, and the gelding who was no where near 16.2 as advertised. The woman was coming from work, it was Friday afternoon and raining, and she had claimed her father was a big TB breeder in Canada. I left before she arrived. She called me and got mad when I politely told her I was not interested in the horse. I felt sorry for all 4 horses but not stupid enough to pay $15,000.00 to rescue that gelding. Poor mares too! I wanted to tell her what I thought of someone who'd treat horses as she did but I did not do so. I looked at over 100 horses before my friends found Cloudy and I accidentally found Callie while a friend showed me another horse. No buyer's remorse.

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