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"Growing" your hunt...

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  • "Growing" your hunt...

    Any creative ideas for attracting new members? We are esp. interested in Pony Clubbers & young riders, as most of our current members are quite old, & who will hunt when we're gone!?! Also interested in creative fundraising , as our kennels are equally decrepit as some of our members...

  • #2
    Constant Effort

    Like most Hunts, we feel challenged by the task of keeping our membership growing. We have done a couple of things the past few years that have made our community more aware of us:

    We spent some $$ and gave our website a face lift. Just click on: www.metamorahunt.com
    This was not a enormous expense and we now feel that it has been money well spent.

    We started a monthly enewsletter. This was very inexpensive and we now have 400+ readers. We are sure that all of the local Pony Club DCs receive our newsletter.

    To encourage riders we have:

    An Introductory Membership for very few $$.
    Weekly FIT (foxhunters in training) Rides during the spring and early summer.
    A Mock Hunt that is geared to new riders.
    A Youth Hunt that encourages young foxhunters.

    For fundraising, we do: 2 Hunter Paces, an A Level Horseshow, a Hunter Trial, a Stable Tour, a yearly "Hunt Country Magazine", a very active silent auction at our Hunt Ball, and this spring we will host our first Sporting Clays Shoot.

    It's a lot of work, but we need to keep ourselves afloat,

    Comment


    • #3
      Check out MFHA.com. Minutes from the January 2013 included notes for new awards, both for TBs in the hunt field (staff and field) and youth awards.

      Find your local pony club (and for that matter 4-H and FFA) and schedule a presentation at one of their meetings, dressed to hunt and prepared to explain a bit about the sport. If you can swing an 'outdoor' meeting bring a couple of horses and hounds for visual demo- if an indoor winter meeting, bring some good footage to show them on tv or computer. In fact, on computer, show the video that is the introduction on MFHA.com.

      Get those young 'uns out hunting- youth days with free caps and once you id the more capable, allow them to shadow staff and play field master. Get them to the kennels and let them help walk out hounds.

      For fundraisers, there are lots of good ideas, one I like from Red Rock is for $100 they will let you name a hound. And they don't care if you name a male hound Sue! (You just have to follow the first letter convention for the particular litter).

      Adopting a fence for some fee can be popular too- Pay $100 (or whatever amount you decide) and a little plaque with your name goes on the coop of your choice.

      Plenty of others but gotta run just now!

      Comment


      • #4
        I think there are a few things hunts can do. (1) Be very open and accessible. It means having a good website and facebook page. if someone comes to your website are the hunt contacts obvious to them. Is your facebook page active. (2) Run events that are open to the public like trail rides, hunter paces, barbeques, etc. (3) I think this is important and that is having Masters that are engaged and active. We have this problem as our masters are older, one doesn't hunt at all any more and the other one occasionally. To me that sends a bad message to prospects when the leaders of the hunt aren't actively involved anymore. (4) make sure you're hunt is well run in the field. It is a bad impression when people leading fields don't know the territory and really don't know how to lead a field.

        Most importantly, when someone new shows up make them feel very welcome whether they are in the fanciest tack ever seen or the most basic tack you've ever seen. Don't play fashion police.

        If I were in charge Juniors would hunt for free whenever they came out. Junior fees never amount to much money anyway and the long term payback is better if you get a senior member out of it.
        A person is smart. People are dumb, panicky dangerous animals and you know it.

        Comment


        • #5
          Our juniors have expressed a strong interest in having a few special hunts just for them where they can meet and socialize with each other instead of being surrounded by 'old' people like most hunts. Ours includes a potluck after the hunt, so everyone can mingle a bit more and parents can chat with adult club members.

          If you truly want to cast a wide net among young people, waive the usual turnout requirement for junior hunts in favor of "neat, clean, and safe". As a junior, I was doing western speed events and trail riding my contesting horse...and didn't own a single piece of clothing or equipment appropriate for foxhunting. I did-eventually-get sucked into hunting (and buy and wear the ridiculous costume) because the hunter paces were so much fun and I was welcomed with my normal tack and clothing. Being open to all disciplines is also a good way to encourage more boys to give foxhunting a try since many of them are not riding English.
          ---------------------------

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by FitToBeTied View Post
            I think there are a few things hunts can do. (1) Be very open and accessible. It means having a good website and facebook page. if someone comes to your website are the hunt contacts obvious to them. Is your facebook page active. (2) Run events that are open to the public like trail rides, hunter paces, barbeques, etc. (3) I think this is important and that is having Masters that are engaged and active. We have this problem as our masters are older, one doesn't hunt at all any more and the other one occasionally. To me that sends a bad message to prospects when the leaders of the hunt aren't actively involved anymore. (4) make sure you're hunt is well run in the field. It is a bad impression when people leading fields don't know the territory and really don't know how to lead a field.

            Most importantly, when someone new shows up make them feel very welcome whether they are in the fanciest tack ever seen or the most basic tack you've ever seen. Don't play fashion police.

            If I were in charge Juniors would hunt for free whenever they came out. Junior fees never amount to much money anyway and the long term payback is better if you get a senior member out of it.
            So let it be written, so let it be done. Accessibility is a big issue with the horse scene in this region and it's always been a problem for the hunts because they are insular and communal. I know there have been some who reach out casually but never anything formally done - to my knowledge - to really go outside the walls, so to speak. I've been advocating for stuff like this for a long time whenever there's a public forum for me to hijack and all I ever get for it are dirty looks from those who seem to feel entitled to public support and tax-payer money to help their hobbies without any of the actual public around to support them.
            Thus do we growl that our big toes have, at this moment, been thrown up from below!

            Comment


            • #7
              Good ideas! We're working to grow our hunt, too. We have a Facebook page, a new website, host hunt clinics, hunter paces and trail rides. We're working on a raffle right now and may do a web-based auction.

              It's all about creating a community and letting people know that foxhunting doesn't have to be too stuffy or too scary.
              Equine Ink - My soapbox for equestrian writings & reviews.
              EquestrianHow2 - Operating instructions for your horse.

              Comment


              • #8
                We spent some $$ and gave our website a face lift. Just click on: www.metamorahunt.com
                This was not a enormous expense and we now feel that it has been money well spent.
                Your website is very nice--it makes me want to come hunt with you! On a future website update, I would try to set off the categories in the "Enjoy the Area" link larger or with a different color so the category headings stand out more. I loved meet the hounds as well.

                Comment


                • #9
                  As an outsider from the UK looking in, the image of fox hunting in the USA seems to be exclusive, full of arcane rules about dress and language that are rigorously enforced. It is apparently difficult to do and also hugely expensive. I hunt and I would hesitate even to ask about following hounds in Virginia as it all seems so complicated! ('First flight', 'second flight', finding the appropriate horse, signing bits of paper etc.) Yet the people who hunt are some of the nicest one could wish to meet.

                  Making things as open, accessible and friendly as possible is definitely the way forward. The Metamora website is really lovely to look at and so encouraging in tone. Connections to the wider community in as many ways as possible is really important.

                  Here in the UK, we are fortunate that the community is involved with the hunt and often the hunt is the community. The hunt is engaged in social activities all year round, raising money for charity, dealing with fallen stock for the farmers, running competitions for horses and non-horse people. The pony club is also still closely linked with local hunts, though not as much as in the past. As part of the normal world, I don't think we are quite so firm, therefor, on rules and tradition.
                  "Good young horses are bred, but good advanced horses are trained" Sam Griffiths

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    I'm not sure of how to gather potential new members in a broad spectrum kind of way, but I just recently made a new friend and now a hunt member in a girl that I currently take several of my university classes with! One of my other friends introduced her to me whenever she had asked if there were any foxhunts in the area (strange question as we're in Texas and literally all the riders at our university are western, save for a few). My friend knew that I hunted, because I did a rather awesome presentation over foxhunting in one of my senior classes. Low and behold, the new girl had hunted in Tennessee and now we're great friends! I gave her my best whip horse to hunt in the field with and she had a fabulous time! So happy we have a new member now =)

                    I find that just going up and talking to people and inviting them out for a visit or even to hunt back in second flight if they're unsure, is the best way to get someone to want to join the hunt. It's really a hit or miss and asking people to be your guest can sometimes end in a very hurtful fashion when they rudely decline, but keep your chin up and smile anyways! Our hunt offers lots of different fun informal days during our season; March 16th we're actually hosting a "western day" for any and all western riders to come and join us on a hunt! We happily welcome everyone! =)
                    Visit MW Equine!
                    Raven Beauty - '08 JC Thoroughbred mare
                    Zeecandoit - '07 JC Thoroughbred gelding
                    DBT My Dark Blue - '07 AHA Arabian Mare

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      just my 2 cents!

                      I think hunts should have a lot of activities where they interact with the public/community. I think casual, relaxed trail rides w/picnics are excellent for showing that we are nice folks, fun and like to eat!!
                      A lot of non-hunt peeps think we all ride crazy and gallop/jump all the time. If hunt trailrides are that way; we reinforce that image. We need to never act snobby. Being open & welcoming to anyone new is extremely important.
                      But often....we really AREN'T looking for more members in areas like this area. Those hunts on the outskirts of major cities; are often inundated with city people wanting to say they hunt. We call them "hunt wannabes". And with limited territories/land; we can't support large fields anymore. So caps go outa sight. Memberships prices go way up. And hunts struggle with getting "good" new members and what to do with wannabes, limiting fields, surviving financially, keeping landowners happy. Hence the appearance of snobbishness at times. Sometimes it's just hunts trying to survive.
                      Have often envied hunts that are further out. They have different pressures I'm sure. An open, well thought out membership drive can be so much fun.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Just be careful!

                        You have gotten a lot of good ideas for finding new members. One caveat: Don't alienate your long-term loyal membership base! There is a business principle that it costs much more to get a new customer than it does to keep an old one. I think the same can be said for foxhunting clubs. In the rush to expand membership, don't ignore the current members, and don't tick off land-owners to the point that they revoke permission to hunt on their property. You don't want to end up with a shorter membership roster and shrinking hunt territory!!

                        OP - I knew you before you moved to the Low Country. Back then I was foxhunting and you were not! Now that's reversed! I'm jealous! Hope you are having fun...
                        Fox Wood Farm

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          The Old Pooperoo weighs in (snore).


                          Well, I should start by saying that I'm old as dirt. When I was a kid in Northern Virginia, most hunts had a waiting list; perhaps, as Wateryglen says, many still do. It was difficult to get in, and one was expected to be able control one's horse and get out of the staff's way. There were no second fields; it was jump and keep up if you wanted to hunt. Now, as good Americans, we are supposed to eschew snobbery, but I think there was a reason for demanding that people knew what they were doing, namely the safety of the hounds, horses, and the people involved. I know from reading this page and the FOL site, that people can get a bit carried away with the turnout thing here; I am always surprised to see pictures of The Quorn or The Cottesmore with some people in their fields dressed in tweed coats or even windbreakers on Opening Day while everybody else looks immaculate. Of the 6 hunts I have joined in Virginia in my long life, the first 2 were tough to get into, the last 4 were glad to have anybody who could write a check. These last 4 are all some distance from DC, as I have steadily moved away from civilization. While I have met many lovely people in these latter groups, I must say that there have been quite a few more people/horses hunting that have forced me to be extra vigilant: following too closely, esp at fences, using my horse as a brake, BACKING UP 10 paces to kick, etc. etc.

                          Now, in these days of yore of which I speak, in order for a kid to join the junior hunt, he/she had to take a written test on hunting terminology and etiquette and pass a riding test during a mock hunt. After the kid was accepted as a junior member, at each hunt the lucky child had to lead his mount up to a designated adult supervisor, whose job it was to inspect their pony and tack for cleanliness. It didn't happen often, but sometimes someone was sent home for failing to meet the mark. In those days, both the child and the parent would have been mortified. Today, the parent would probably argue like a disgruntled father at a little league game. We were taught that it was a privilege to hunt, and all the kids that I knew who rode thought the effort was worth it. Today, many seem to be much more interested in going round and round in a ring. In our hunt, things are so different today that a kid could probably show up in flip-flops and shorts and be allowed to hunt. People constantly tease me because my white mare is always gleaming when I hunt; but I learned in the hard school of the junior hunt back when the earth was cooling.

                          My point, and I do have one, is that while all these suggestions about being more welcoming and less fussy are valid, it would be a shame to lose sight of the ideal in an attempt to gain new members, no matter how badly their funds are needed. In that ideal world, these newly-minted members will make a real effort to learn the ropes quickly, thereby improving the experience for themselves and everybody else.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by LexInVA View Post
                            So let it be written, so let it be done. Accessibility is a big issue with the horse scene in this region and it's always been a problem for the hunts because they are insular and communal. I know there have been some who reach out casually but never anything formally done - to my knowledge - to really go outside the walls, so to speak. I've been advocating for stuff like this for a long time whenever there's a public forum for me to hijack and all I ever get for it are dirty looks from those who seem to feel entitled to public support and tax-payer money to help their hobbies without any of the actual public around to support them.
                            What kind of accessibility do you want? A lot of hunts post flyers at feed stores and tack stores about hunter paces, summer trail rides, training sessions, etc. They send out mailers. Some have great FB pages, others have great websites. Some don't put any info out there due to issues with hunt sabs (yes, even here in lovely VA). They advertise in the local horse magazines too.

                            These are private clubs. If you want to be considered for membership, you are the one that needs to make the effort. Do you want to hunt? Contact the Hunt Secretary. They are very willing to answer your questions and put you together with a hunt member that just might chaperone you around for a cap or two.

                            I really don't understand your comments about advocating. Advocating for what? If you want to be involved with foxhunting, or steeplechasing or hounds, or what have you--- YOU make the effort to contact the club.

                            And what do you mean about people entitled to public money for their hobbies? I pay my way, just like every other hunt member. They are called Subscription Fees, and yes, they are painful, but well, well worth the price. There are fundraisers for the club, because they are not non-profit groups. Can you even imagine how much it costs in Frontline alone for a single season? They need $$$$ to run.

                            I just don't understand your comments. I'm not sure how much contact you've had with any hunts in VA, but I personally invite you to come out with me, on one of my very nice fieldhunters. I will show you what a wonderful group of people there are in the hunt field, first hand.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              As a young person (early 20s) who has been out with my local hunt (paying a capping fee or a free hunting day), one of the primary concerns for me is financial. Joining the hunt is expensive and while I fully intend to do it as soon as I possible can, it may be a few years.

                              So please continue to allow capping and the occasional free hunt - its a great way to draw in us youngsters who will pursue memberships once our paychecks allow Also, if "free" hunts can be advertised with flyers in local tacks stores or local barns with boarders who might be interested, that might encourage a few more people to come give it a try.

                              The couple of times I've been out hunting have really made me fall in love with the sport. I (and possible other young people in my situation) do think the subscription fee is worth every penny, but I'm just not yet a place in my life where the cost of horse keeping + a subscription fee is doable.

                              Comment


                              • #16
                                Originally posted by LexInVA View Post
                                So let it be written, so let it be done. Accessibility is a big issue with the horse scene in this region and it's always been a problem for the hunts because they are insular and communal. I know there have been some who reach out casually but never anything formally done - to my knowledge - to really go outside the walls, so to speak. I've been advocating for stuff like this for a long time whenever there's a public forum for me to hijack and all I ever get for it are dirty looks from those who seem to feel entitled to public support and tax-payer money to help their hobbies without any of the actual public around to support them.

                                Oh phooey. Everyone says this about any horse-thing they are intimidated by, a little afraid of, or not sure about. The GMO/Dressage group for our area consistently reaches out beyond our 'walls' as you see it and encourage participation with low price clinics, we have options for fun learning opps (That's our mandate, to educate, not to have what, pool parties?) and year after year we reach and offer and reach and offer and change it up but frankly....there are only so many interested parties out there, and only so many of those who actually will put their money where their keyboard is and suck up the ego and show up and learn about something new. Especially the older we get, that jumping in cold, can be intimidating.

                                So, you got an invitation, in writing (err, pixels). So, I look forward to hearing how it went.

                                Comment


                                • #17
                                  I can't speak for all clubs in the US - but the ones I know and hunt with do a heck of a lot of outreach. They hold all kinds of activities, parties, rides, clinics, all sorts of things. All in an effort to recruit new members as well as pay for hunt expenses.

                                  "Caps" are nothing new. They are customary - but there is a reason hunts limit them. Because a club MUST be able to depend on a consistent revenue stream. That revenue stream is used almost exclusively to pay for the hounds. Those animals must eat every day, they must have veterinary care, their kennels must be cleaned and kept in excellent condition. There is no way around that. If a club permits people to just come when they want with no limit - income will come in dribbles and spurts or maybe not at all.

                                  This is not a sport you pick up and put down. It's not for wannabees - it's too dangerous a sport for that sort of person - and they often pose a danger in the field. It's not eventing or dressage - it's not a solitary sport. It's a group sport.

                                  These are private clubs with groups of people who work very hard to run the club, maintain panels and trails, do outreach to landowners, and they do NOT take taxpayer money. Hunts are completely self-funded, and if they are ever on public land they pay for access just like any other member of the public - plus depending on the state they purchase hunting licenses. As far as who is contributing to the preservation of open space - out of all the disciplines look to the foxhunting community to set the example.

                                  Is there a reason the fields are not full of 200 horses three days a week? Sure there is. It's not because the club if full of snobby elitists.

                                  It's because hunting impacts that landowners property. Clubs have to be very careful their activities do not damage farmland or open space - it is NOT a free for all. We have permission to ride on the land - it's not a license to trample someones crops. It's why foxhunters avoided seeded fields, are expected to keep gates closes and to make temporary repairs to damaged fences. It's why we are expected to slow down around beef or dairy cattle to avoid running them.

                                  Clubs keep their membership at a level that can be supported by their territory. Not all clubs have vast acreages available to them. Some do - which is wonderful. Perhaps a club may be gaining or losing members for a variety of reasons, but to say they aren't doing enough outreach is just false. Who do you think puts on the point to points? Hunt clubs.

                                  As far as "signing a piece of paper" - it's called a waiver of liability. In states that have equine activity liability or recreational use statutes - landowners are somewhat protected against lawsuits if someone gets injured, and hunt clubs require riders to sign a waiver. Big deal. Hunt clubs have insurance. It's another expense of the hunt club - which is reflected in cap fees - a portion of the cap goes to pay for the increased insurance costs of non members.

                                  If folks want to come foxhunting, just pick up the phone and call the hunt secretary - if you don't know the location of the nearest hunt just go to the MFHA website. There's no mystery to it - the website has links that help explain the sport for newcomers - and the hunt itself will have materials as well.

                                  The only real requirement is that you have the riding skills and your horse is suitable and not a danger to itself or others. No one is going to perform a military style inspection of your attire, nor will they ask to see the labels on your tweed. Heck - no one expects a newcomer to spend money on attire or anything special - just talk to the Secretary.

                                  Foxhunting is not a commercial, profit driven activity. It's not eventing, it's not hunters or jumpers. You're hunting - just like deer hunters, rabbit hunters, quail, waterfowlers, etc. We have more in common with the hunting community than we do with the horse industry, if you really think about it.

                                  Our sport is governed by state and federal hunting laws and regulations. The MFHA is a body we voluntarily adhere to for a variety of reasons, including ethics, maintenance of the stud book, etc - but it is not the same as the FEI or USEF. So folks need to stop comparing it to for profit horse sports and horse shows.

                                  The Farm Bill is more likely to impact foxhunting than a drug rule from the FEI. Newcomers to the sport need to understand that yes, we're riding horses cross country and it is a form of equestrian activity. But we are in fact hunting and the sport and its clubs have more in common with waterfowlers and their clubs. Or upland game hunters.

                                  The history, the traditions, the horn calls, staff commands - there is so much to learn. Everyone can enjoy the sport in their own way - not all foxhunters know the names of each hound or their breeding. Some hunt to ride. And that's fine - that's terrific - clubs are happy to have these members.

                                  Some ride to hunt - and those folks are often the ones showing up at the kennel on cold rainy mornings - walking hounds, helping with the kennels, etc. Others, like me, will whelp puppies at home and be the one staying up all night making sure the bitch and puppies are healthy. And others are very devoted to the running of the club, the future of the club and the sport - there are all kinds of members and they're all welcome. Who do folks think make all this happen? Well bred and trained hounds do not come shrink wrapped from UPS.

                                  This is not an insular, closed sport. It's not a taxpayer funded sport. These are private individuals hunting on public and/or private land and not bothering anyone. They're fun people, they're usually darn good horsemen and riders, and if you are willing to learn, they're willing to mentor and help you in any way.

                                  Hunt clubs are part of local communities and rural economies. These are not clubs that buy stuff in China or consider themselves separate and apart from their neighbors. They purchase products and do business with local small businesses. Local businesses advertise and contribute to the activities of hunt clubs. Clubs that are able to feed flesh do so as a service to local farmers - and farmers appreciate it. Members of clubs make a point to purchase products from local small businesses. I'm sorry people outside rural areas choose not to see that. Come here and live in a rural area, and see how a rural economy works - and then maybe you'll change your tune.

                                  I'm perplexed by some comments that suggest that we're supposed to disregard our rules to accommodate newcomers. While any club is more than happy to have a new member - it's unreasonable to suggest that we do not require them to have some basics. One does not go duck hunting with a semi-automatic pistol, and neither does one attend a dressage show with a cart and buggy. So if a club requires a person utilize English style tack or discourage members from using bling or brightly colored tack I'm not convinced it's a legitimate reason to trash the sport.

                                  Every activity has rules - some can be bent or broken, but not others. It's not a big deal.
                                  Last edited by JSwan; Feb. 20, 2013, 09:10 PM.
                                  Brothers and sisters, I bid you beware
                                  Of giving your heart to a dog to tear.
                                  -Rudyard Kipling

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                                  • #18
                                    jmho !!

                                    Well said JS !!
                                    Lex !? Boo on you! Why aren't you joining in? Just do it!!
                                    Old Pooperoo - I love you !!

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                                    • #19
                                      Originally posted by JSwan View Post
                                      I'm perplexed by some comments that suggest that we're supposed to disregard our rules to accommodate newcomers. While any club is more than happy to have a new member - it's unreasonable to suggest that we do not require them to have some basics. One does not go duck hunting with a semi-automatic pistol, and neither does one attend a dressage show with a cart and buggy. So if a club requires a person utilize English style tack or discourage members from using bling or brightly colored tack I'm not convinced it's a legitimate reason to trash the sport.

                                      Every activity has rules - some can be bent or broken, but not others. It's not a big deal.
                                      While I realize you got on your soap box and kept rolling, you might be letting a bit of East Coast influence your assumptions. Sadly, many parts of the country are not awash in pony clubbers.

                                      Specifically, my suggestion was to loosen turnout requirements for specific, JUNIOR HUNTS as a tool for exposing more JUNIOR riders to hunting. In many parts of the country, there are more teenagers riding in Western tack than English. Especially when it comes to boys and to kids of both genders who are comfortable riding outside the arena and can handle their horse in a group. You know--the specific demographic clubs are most trying to recuit?

                                      So, yes, it seems to me, that if a club is looking for kids who can ride the hair off a horse and wants to give them some positive exposure to foxhunting in the hope they'll support hunting in the future, then it makes sense to encourage them to ride in hunter paces and in an informal junior hunt a couple times a year. If that means changing the turnout threshold to "neat, clean, and safe" for those particular outings well, then, hopefully the volunteers and staff can avert their eyes, maintain a stiff upper lip, and drown their sorrows in the after-hunt cocktail.

                                      I don't mean to sound snotty, but it's cut-your-own-throat stupid to tell someone (particularly a teen or young adult) who could be a really good, solid member that he or she needs to go get the 'right' saddle, pad, bridle, boots, helmet, breeches, and coat just to be allowed to ride in an open hunt and see if he or she wants to move forward in the sport. To actually join and hunt? Sure--here's your hairnet. But that was not the OPs question. First you get them hooked on the sport, THEN you get them to spend lots of time and money on it...
                                      ---------------------------

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                                      • #20
                                        I don't mean to sound snotty...
                                        it's not about what you sound like. If I'm going to ride in a Little Britches Rodeo, first I have to buy the right clothes:
                                        Wrangler is the exclusive jean sponsor and any direct competitor's
                                        patch/sticker may not be worn by NLBRA contestants/personnel
                                        during competition, regardless of size.
                                        I. Clothing worn by contestants and personnel may be adorned
                                        with patches, stickers and monograms, except direct competitors
                                        to Wrangler; however, that signage may not be larger than 3"x5".
                                        J. Only approved Association logos may be worn on clothing during
                                        competition and awards’ ceremonies. A complete list of approved
                                        Associations will be posted on the NLBRA Website and in the
                                        NLBRA News. No other Association clothing may be worn.


                                        Those kids in western saddles are going to have Hell trying to jump in a barrel saddle.

                                        So you advocate showing up in a western saddle, western boots, zebra striped saddle pad and studded pink bridle? At a hunt?

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