• Welcome to the Chronicle Forums.
    Please complete your profile. The forums and the rest of www.chronofhorse.com has single sign-in, so your log in information for one will automatically work for the other. Disclaimer: The opinions expressed here are the views of the individual and do not necessarily reflect the views and opinions of The Chronicle of the Horse.

Announcement

Collapse

Forum rules and no-advertising policy

As a participant on this forum, it is your responsibility to know and follow our rules. Please read this message in its entirety.

Board Rules

1. You’re responsible for what you say.
As outlined in Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act, The Chronicle of the Horse and its affiliates, as well Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd., the developers of vBulletin, are not legally responsible for statements made in the forums.

This is a public forum viewed by a wide spectrum of people, so please be mindful of what you say and who might be reading it—details of personal disputes are likely better handled privately. While posters are legally responsible for their statements, the moderators may in their discretion remove or edit posts that violate these rules. Users have the ability to modify or delete their own messages after posting, but administrators generally will not delete posts, threads or accounts upon request.

Outright inflammatory, vulgar, harassing, malicious or otherwise inappropriate statements and criminal charges unsubstantiated by a reputable news source or legal documentation will not be tolerated and will be dealt with at the discretion of the moderators.

2. Conversations in horse-related forums should be horse-related.
The forums are a wonderful source of information and support for members of the horse community. While it’s understandably tempting to share information or search for input on other topics upon which members might have a similar level of knowledge, members must maintain the focus on horses.

3. Keep conversations productive, on topic and civil.
Discussion and disagreement are inevitable and encouraged; personal insults, diatribes and sniping comments are unproductive and unacceptable. Whether a subject is light-hearted or serious, keep posts focused on the current topic and of general interest to other participants of that thread. Utilize the private message feature or personal email where appropriate to address side topics or personal issues not related to the topic at large.

4. No advertising in the discussion forums.
Posts in the discussion forums directly or indirectly advertising horses, jobs, items or services for sale or wanted will be removed at the discretion of the moderators. Use of the private messaging feature or email addresses obtained through users’ profiles for unsolicited advertising is not permitted.

Company representatives may participate in discussions and answer questions about their products or services, or suggest their products on recent threads if they fulfill the criteria of a query. False "testimonials" provided by company affiliates posing as general consumers are not appropriate, and self-promotion of sales, ad campaigns, etc. through the discussion forums is not allowed.

Paid advertising is available on our classifieds site and through the purchase of banner ads. The tightly monitored Giveaways forum permits free listings of genuinely free horses and items available or wanted (on a limited basis). Items offered for trade are not allowed.

Advertising Policy Specifics
When in doubt of whether something you want to post constitutes advertising, please contact a moderator privately in advance for further clarification. Refer to the following points for general guidelines:

Horses – Only general discussion about the buying, leasing, selling and pricing of horses is permitted. If the post contains, or links to, the type of specific information typically found in a sales or wanted ad, and it’s related to a horse for sale, regardless of who’s selling it, it doesn’t belong in the discussion forums.

Stallions – Board members may ask for suggestions on breeding stallion recommendations. Stallion owners may reply to such queries by suggesting their own stallions, only if their horse fits the specific criteria of the original poster. Excessive promotion of a stallion by its owner or related parties is not permitted and will be addressed at the discretion of the moderators.

Services – Members may use the forums to ask for general recommendations of trainers, barns, shippers, farriers, etc., and other members may answer those requests by suggesting themselves or their company, if their services fulfill the specific criteria of the original post. Members may not solicit other members for business if it is not in response to a direct, genuine query.

Products – While members may ask for general opinions and suggestions on equipment, trailers, trucks, etc., they may not list the specific attributes for which they are in the market, as such posts serve as wanted ads.

Event Announcements – Members may post one notification of an upcoming event that may be of interest to fellow members, if the original poster does not benefit financially from the event. Such threads may not be “bumped” excessively. Premium members may post their own notices in the Event Announcements forum.

Charities/Rescues – Announcements for charitable or fundraising events can only be made for 501(c)(3) tax-exempt organizations. Special exceptions may be made, at the moderators’ discretion and direction, for board-related events or fundraising activities in extraordinary circumstances.

Occasional posts regarding horses available for adoption through IRS-registered horse rescue or placement programs are permitted in the appropriate forums, but these threads may be limited at the discretion of the moderators. Individuals may not advertise or make announcements for horses in need of rescue, placement or adoption unless the horse is available through a recognized rescue or placement agency or government-run entity or the thread fits the criteria for and is located in the Giveaways forum.

5. Do not post copyrighted photographs unless you have purchased that photo and have permission to do so.

6. Respect other members.
As members are often passionate about their beliefs and intentions can easily be misinterpreted in this type of environment, try to explore or resolve the inevitable disagreements that arise in the course of threads calmly and rationally.

If you see a post that you feel violates the rules of the board, please click the “alert” button (exclamation point inside of a triangle) in the bottom left corner of the post, which will alert ONLY the moderators to the post in question. They will then take whatever action, or no action, as deemed appropriate for the situation at their discretion. Do not air grievances regarding other posters or the moderators in the discussion forums.

Please be advised that adding another user to your “Ignore” list via your User Control Panel can be a useful tactic, which blocks posts and private messages by members whose commentary you’d rather avoid reading.

7. We have the right to reproduce statements made in the forums.
The Chronicle of the Horse may copy, quote, link to or otherwise reproduce posts, or portions of posts, in print or online for advertising or editorial purposes, if attributed to their original authors, and by posting in this forum, you hereby grant to The Chronicle of the Horse a perpetual, non-exclusive license under copyright and other rights, to do so.

8. We reserve the right to enforce and amend the rules.
The moderators may delete, edit, move or close any post or thread at any time, or refrain from doing any of the foregoing, in their discretion, and may suspend or revoke a user’s membership privileges at any time to maintain adherence to the rules and the general spirit of the forum. These rules may be amended at any time to address the current needs of the board.

Please see our full Terms of Service and Privacy Policy for more information.

Thanks for being a part of the COTH forums!

(Revised 1/26/16)
See more
See less

Wood chewing S.O.B. wish they'd told me..

Collapse
This topic is closed.
X
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #41
    I hope that you mean "a better place" in an absolute sense, and not euphemistically.

    Comment

    • Original Poster

      #42
      A better place means not at my farm

      The huntsman will use him as a guest horse if the hot wire works and he doesn't tear the barn down.

      If not, he'll be hound food.

      It's really a shame, otherwise, he couldn't be a nicer horse.

      Comment


      • #43
        You know OP, I'm actually quite horrified with your attitude. I have two people who are VERY interested. But yet, if he doesn't work out, he's hound food?

        I hope no one sells you another horse! Then your fences and barn will remain pristine. Let's hope you don't become incontinent or drool when you get old...off to the knackers.

        Comment

        • Original Poster

          #44
          For those of you doubting//

          The people I got him from admitted that he is a confirmed wood chewer and has done so for over a decade. He will not keep a muzzle on, he will injure himself in order to remove it. It is not nerves, a calmer horse I've never seen. He got along instantly with the other horse. He just simply, apparently, enjoys a habit he's had for years, at the expense of my woodwork.

          He will either respect the hot wire and leave the side of the barn alone, or he'll benefit the hunt/hounds in some other fashion.

          I didn't "give up", I cut my losses. I'm not sure how much it would cost to replace a SUPPORT beam in the barn that is chewed, in ten days, not in half, but a third of a 6"x6" beam looks like someone tried to file it in half.

          It's set in cement, as are the other four upright posts and some cross beams that he would have had to stretch his head up to an uncomfortable level to chew.

          He pissed on a half bale of green, fragrant hay and destroyed a stall with 50 year old oak beams.

          I won't even appologize for giving him away. He will either have a useful purpose under saddle or he'll meet a merciful end.

          I would not have purchased a horse willingly with this habit.

          Comment


          • #45
            So, now he's going to pay the ultimate price for chewing your precious fence and barn. Nice. Even with others saying they are interested. I hope you don't have children.

            Comment


            • #46
              So, the sellers lied and didn't tell you about his wood chewing before the sale? Did you see any evidence when you tried him? Did you do the necessary due diligence before you purchased him? Did you purchase him knowing about the wood chewing? I don't quite understand.

              The phrase, "well, too bad, he'll be hound food" sounds a bit cavalier.

              Comment


              • #47
                Originally posted by Carolinadreamin' View Post

                The phrase, "well, too bad, he'll be hound food" sounds a bit cavalier.
                That's an understatement.

                So the previous owner confirmed he was a wood chewer? I thought they weren't returning your calls or emails.

                I'm trying to figure out how peeing on hay can be a death sentence for a horse. What do you do if they poop in the trailer? Put them to the rack?

                Guess her next horse better toe the line.

                Or else.
                Brothers and sisters, I bid you beware
                Of giving your heart to a dog to tear.
                -Rudyard Kipling

                Comment


                • #48
                  I stopped having horses peeing on the hay when I realized that I had to let them pick which part of the stall they were going to eliminate in. My mare kept messing up her hay until I moved it to a diffent corner, which was less ideal for me. It worked the same way with the boys.

                  My gelding started eating wood 6 years into my owning him. I was buying my farm, and when he moved to my new farm he stopped chewing wood. He had a lot of great pasture and 24/7 turnout with a run-in, and the urge to chew went away.

                  Comment


                  • #49
                    Originally posted by SwampYankee View Post
                    I'd put him outside in a steel round-pen that you can move as he eats down each "crop circle." Or a field fenced with stone walls and wire. He needs to be denied the opportunity . . .

                    This is about as far as I got, because the old guy is half beaver. He lives behind electrobraid and in a nice corral panel pen. The one wooden thing he had access to, well he ate it down to the screws holding it together and then nibbled around the screws.

                    If you are honestly still thinking about doing this guy in I'd be happy to take him, and I don't live too far away.

                    Ah, I see your huntsman took him. Good for him.
                    Courageous Weenie Eventer Wannabe
                    Incredible Invisible

                    Comment

                    • Original Poster

                      #50
                      Harsh

                      A senior hunt member of our hunt emailed me an ad for two horses, both staff horses with a recognized hunt that was folding. After extensive calls and emails, I purchased the horse, from photos taken in the hunt field last season. He was inexpensive and sold as a 14 yr old made hunt horse, proven, with NO vices, who would hunt quietly in the field. At the price I paid, even, if he had only turned out to be a pasture pet, I probably still would have kept him.

                      He's done nearly $2000 of damage to my fences and stable. No, peeing on hay is not a capital offense, just annoying as hell when the same horse chews 3 inches off a 18 inch section of six by six in ten days.

                      I'll add that while the horse's new Coggins says he's 14, the vet must never have opened his mouth. I doubt that a 14 year old that chews like he does would be that "long in the tooth".

                      I have children, I do not expect them to be destructive to my property or anyone elses.

                      I suppose I could have sent him along to the next "oh I'll love him more and he'll stop" Pollyanna, but he'd have just been returned with an "I had NO IDEA it could be that bad".

                      Why isn't anyone angered at the people who just cared about getting rid of him before May 1st?

                      He needed to be in a concrete barn with metal fencing, posts and all (I have to replace 4 in the field). I do not have either of those.

                      There is nothing wrong with humanely disposing of a horse with abborant behavior issues. What happens to the body after shouldn't be an issue.

                      I hope he lives a long and productive life as a guest horse. I hope he's hunted and loved forever.

                      I'll get back with you.

                      Comment


                      • #51
                        Originally posted by LauraKY View Post
                        So, now he's going to pay the ultimate price for chewing your precious fence and barn. Nice. Even with others saying they are interested. I hope you don't have children.
                        OP shouldn't have animals either with her zero tolerance for anything not perfectly up to her expectations.
                        Equus Keepus Brokus

                        Comment


                        • #52
                          Except ReSomething, if he doesn't work out for the huntsman, he's going to be fed to the hounds. I guess no one better ever piss off the OP. This one just really ticks. me. off!

                          Comment


                          • #53
                            Originally posted by 2ndyrgal View Post
                            There is nothing wrong with humanely disposing of a horse with abborant behavior issues. What happens to the body after shouldn't be an issue.

                            I don't have a problem with feeding a horse to the hounds. I've taken an old, unsound horse to the kennel.

                            What I have a problem with is your attitude. You didn't even give this horse a chance.

                            That's poor horsemanship.
                            Brothers and sisters, I bid you beware
                            Of giving your heart to a dog to tear.
                            -Rudyard Kipling

                            Comment


                            • #54
                              Originally posted by LauraKY View Post
                              You know OP, I'm actually quite horrified with your attitude. I have two people who are VERY interested. But yet, if he doesn't work out, he's hound food?

                              I hope no one sells you another horse! Then your fences and barn will remain pristine. Let's hope you don't become incontinent or drool when you get old...off to the knackers.
                              I agree with this. I feel the 'better place' post was trolling.
                              Horse Show Names Free name website with over 6200 names. Want to add? PM me!

                              Comment


                              • #55
                                Originally posted by Liberty View Post
                                OP shouldn't have animals either with her zero tolerance for anything not perfectly up to her expectations.
                                Exactly. I grew up in a very tolerant household. When my father's llewellyn setter tore up everyone of my 100 something stuffed animals (all except the stuffed rabbit I slept with, whew), my father just said oh well, we'll get you more.

                                I don't expect anyone to be as tolerant as my family has always been about animals, but if someone is soooooooooooooo anal that she cannot rehome a horse, and doesn't care if he is put down if he chews wood, well, she doesn't need a horse. What if OP's puppy chews an antique table leg, or takes down all the curtains as my father's dog did? (He did not like to be left at home when we went out to dinner.)

                                OP, let someone on coth have the horse. You said you got him cheaply. Let him go and don't be so Ok with having him put down. Why was he allowed to chew for so long before you intervened? I got Quitt as soon as my 2 started chewing when we moved to a new barn.

                                And next time, as I'm sure there will be, be observant. If the horse has "always chewed wood," there will be evidence at the barn and on trees in pastues, etc.

                                Comment


                                • #56
                                  I'm appalled. Jeebus. I was watching this last night and the interest in the horse from multiple parties. Didn't expect this outcome.



                                  *gets out list and adds a name*.
                                  "Aye God, Woodrow..."

                                  Comment


                                  • #57
                                    I would take this horse in a heartbeat. I even have a completely electrified field he could live in.

                                    This whole chain of events seems very callous.

                                    Comment


                                    • #58
                                      Originally posted by spacehorse View Post
                                      I would take this horse in a heartbeat. I even have a completely electrified field he could live in.

                                      This whole chain of events seems very callous.
                                      Disgusting is more like it.

                                      Comment


                                      • #59
                                        If the situations were reversed, I'd be taken out back and shot for chewing gum or gasp smoking.
                                        Boy, our collective horses are tolerant of our collective bad riding, confused signals, yanks, cracks on their backs, slipping sliding, bad trailer rides, shots, accidental gouges with spurs, backwards bits, cold shower hosing, and misread colic, moldy feedings etc. On the whole horses are a very tolerant and forgiving species.

                                        Comment


                                        • #60
                                          I too, am appalled and horrified. I would be very hard put to take another horse, but I was getting ready to discuss just that possibility with my husband. But it appears that the OP has made a decision, not just for herself but for anyone else willing to take this horse, that he should not have another chance.

                                          I hope that the huntsman has more sense.

                                          When the OP was looking for this horse, she received many suggestions from folks here who knew of good horses that were available. I'm sure those folks are all glad that she didn't choose those horses.

                                          And I'm sure that when the OP posts, yet again, about her search for her next horse, that she will be greeted with a resounding...silence

                                          Comment

                                          Working...
                                          X