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equestrian job resumes

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  • equestrian job resumes

    i have been riding and stuff for 10-15 yrs and i have never had to make a resume for my horsey background .i would like to get a job at a "A"level barn and find that most barns at that level want some kind of resume or something telling them about your experience and other horse/riding background and i am so lost of what BO look for in a professional resume and what kind of things to put on it and how the layout of a horse resume should look like.does it need to have a similar layout,like you would for a non horsey job etc?.

    does anyone know of some examples on internet or anyone interested in sharing one of theirs(all info will not be shared with others)

    would like to make a good impression starting with a good resume.Thanx to all in advance for replying
    Last edited by my_doran; Jun. 26, 2010, 04:18 AM. Reason: spelling
    http://myridingjourney.blogspot.com

  • #2
    Originally posted by my_doran View Post
    i have been riding and stuff for 10-15 yrs and i have never had to make a resume for my horsey background .i would like to get a job at a "A"level barn and find that most barns at that level want some kind of resume or something telling them about your experience and other horse/riding background and i am so lost of what BO look for in a professional resume and what kind of things to put on it and how the layout of a horse resume should look like.does it need to have a similar layout,like you would for a non horsey job etc?.

    does anyone know of some examples on internet or anyone interested in sharing one of theirs(all info will not be shared with others)

    would like to make a good impression starting with a good resume.Thanx to all in advance for replying
    Use capitalization, spelling, punctuation, and spacing properly to start with?

    Actually, as far as I can tell, the best resume format is the one that presents you and your skills in the best light - so for a job where academic qualifications are really important, you want them somewhere near the top, but for a job that cares more about what you can do than where you learned to do it, academic stuff might belong further down the page.

    A few key tips, no matter what format you end up using:

    1. MAKE SURE YOUR CONTACT INFORMATION AND NAME ARE ON IT CLEARLY AND CORRECTLY.

    Seriously, people really do forget to put a phone number on and that sort of thing. (As a side note here: If your only email address currently is hottychix32@freemailprovider.com - sign up for a new one through gmail or another web mail provider with a more professional user name. Some variation on your name is generally a reasonable place to start.)

    2. Keep it short and sweet. For ANY low level jobs, the person looking at the resumes probably has much better things to do than read seventeen pages of your life history. One page, two at the absolute most. (But really, one. Tweak the margins a tiny bit if you need to, to get it all on one page and still not look cramped.)

    3. It should be visually appealing. This does not mean flowers and a fancy monogram, it means the reader's eye should flow easily from one section to the next. If you end up with weird blocks of white space, change the formatting around. If someone's skimming it, you want their eye to be naturally drawn to the things you really really don't want them to miss, so don't bury key things in the middle of a long list or block of text.

    The goal is to get all of your important information in there and keep it easy to read - not just for the brain but for the eyes, too. So no funky fonts, either. Handwriting font might look 'unique' but who wants to read a whole page of it?

    (Btw, do not print your resume on neon pink paper, either. I had a friend who was hiring get a resume from an applicant in on neon pink paper and even if he'd wanted to read it, he COULDN'T, it was so eye-searingly painful.)

    4. Have a nicely formatted electronic version. These days a surprisingly large number of people are happy enough just having something emailed to them. A pdf is normally a 'safe' file format that just about everyone should be able to read, and it preserves the formatting you've set up. (If you don't know how to generate a PDF, it's pretty easy to figure out if you google it.)

    5. Finally - PUT TIME INTO YOUR COVER LETTER. Keep it short and sweet also, but take the time to personalize it. Do some research on the particular stable you're applying to. Ideally the PERSON who you will be sending your information to. Why do you want to work there in specific? More importantly, why do they want to hire YOU instead of however many other people they might have lined up? Do not have a form cover letter you use for every single job, because they LOOK like form cover letters. (I mean, there's some stuff that will probably end up in all of them "I am responding to your job listing in such-and-such place" or "thank you for taking the time to review my resume, I look forward to hearing from you" or whatever, but there should still be about a paragraph of stuff unique to that particular job.)

    I hope some of that is helpful. I have insomnia so I can't sleep so I kind of went on a bit, but those seem to be good general rules that apply just about everywhere that requires a resume. I have not actually ever submitted one to a stable, though, so hopefully someone who has done can give you specific pointers.

    (But seriously. Particularly contact info and having a non-stupid sounding email address. I mean, does cutiepie1837 sound like someone you'd want to be trusting the care of extremely expensive horses to?)

    Comment

    • Original Poster

      #3
      hi

      yeah i am not one to do the fancy paper,stickers,fancy writing etc kind of stuff you explained for a resume..and totally agree also with your last 2 sentencces on email name...lol mine is angelkitten,i just might have a seperate email account for things like this.
      stable jobs i would be applying for would be anything required.from stable management,training/exercising,to teaching beg/intermediate students and everything in between.
      your post was very informative despite it being long. .
      http://myridingjourney.blogspot.com

      Comment


      • #4
        Go online, search resumes, find a template and follow the instructions. You will be able to develope a resume.
        http://STA551.com
        845-363-1875

        Comment


        • #5
          What's wrong with long?
          The Official Name Thread
          http://www.chronofhorse.com/forum/sh...d.php?t=261959

          Comment


          • #6
            ...That was her trying to help you and give lots of detailed info.
            The Official Name Thread
            http://www.chronofhorse.com/forum/sh...d.php?t=261959

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by kdow View Post
              Use capitalization, spelling, punctuation, and spacing properly to start with?
              Yes, this!

              Comment


              • #8
                When you are done, have several people look it over and proofread for spelling/grammar and content. See if they can come up with any questions about what is there and anything you need to clarify or add. (Both cover letter and resume)

                If you went to college (or are attending now), you may be able to return to the career services department and have them help you develop your resume. Most colleges are still there to help their alumni even if you graduated awhile ago.
                Flickr

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by my_doran View Post
                  your post was very informative despite it being long. .
                  I ramble when I'm awake due to insomnia. So I wouldn't write a resume then.

                  (Or if I did, I would be prepared to go over it with a red pen quite aggressively later on. Sometimes doing a longer resume and then trimming it down once it's in front of you is actually easier than trying to keep it short from the start. Depends how your brain works, really. Plus, sometimes I save a 'long format' resume just as a place to have all my education and employment information and that kind of thing in one file, neatly formatted, so when I need to put together a resume or fill out a job application form, I can just refer to that file.)

                  Since you kind of mentioned it - as far as actually using 'resume' paper, I'd hope someone who works in the industry could tell you what's expected.

                  A lot of people are moving away from that now (in part because so many resumes ARE sent electronically as pdfs these days, and no one is going to stock fancy paper in their office just to print those out on if they want a paper copy) but if 95% of the resumes they get are sent in on nice paper, you don't really want yours to be one of the 5% that comes across as cheaply done by comparison, you know? It makes it seem like you just couldn't be bothered to put the effort in.

                  (I think resume writing might be kind of like hunters - you want to stand out from the crowd, but not by STANDING OUT. So subtle personalizing touches are fine, but you don't want to do the resume equivalent of riding into the ring wearing a cowboy hat for a traditional hunter class. )

                  Oh, and standard advice now seems to be to not bother to actually list references on the resume itself - it's generally acceptable to just put "references available on request." I was told that if they're explicitly requested in the job listing, it's better to put them in the cover letter than on the resume itself. That may be something that varies from industry to industry, though.

                  Anyone out there reading this who actually reads these resumes as part of their job? What do you WANT to see?

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by furlong47 View Post
                    When you are done, have several people look it over and proofread for spelling/grammar and content. See if they can come up with any questions about what is there and anything you need to clarify or add. (Both cover letter and resume)

                    If you went to college (or are attending now), you may be able to return to the career services department and have them help you develop your resume. Most colleges are still there to help their alumni even if you graduated awhile ago.
                    Both very good tips! (Particularly having it looked over by multiple people. You're more likely to catch stupid mistakes that way, like typos that aren't picked up by spell-check because they're still a properly spelled word.)

                    The one thing about your career services department, though, is that they may not be able to provide really industry-specific guidance, depending on how much experience they have. Where I'm taking classes right now, if you want to put together a resume for applying for a job on Broadway, they're the place to go. For a job in film or television - they're still kind of figuring that out. (The film/tv program is only about 5 years old, so there's a learning curve for everyone.)

                    To that end, if you think they may not know about equestrian industry expectations, if you can get your hands on a resume that someone else has done and SUCCESSFULLY applied for a job with, you can take that in with yours so they have a kind of guide as to what they should be aiming at with yours.

                    (Sorry for going on so much about this - last term we spent about two weeks in one class debating resumes and cover letters because the powers that be in the department decided they were tired of department graduates sending out resumes and cover letters that were just plain embarrassing looking for the school.)

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      For my resume, I used a standard format (much like you would see for any other job). I think it is important to list not only your equestrian endeavors, but also your education level (list degrees, special honors, etc) and other activities. Many employers will want to see that you are intelligent and hopefully well rounded (LOL as well rounded as us crazy horse people can be!).

                      On mine I listed my degree (with both major and minors listed) with university name and gpa, what activities/clubs I was part of (if they are horse related), and internships (in my case I did a veterinary internship). Don't forget to list any other languages you can speak- this can be very beneficial to an employer!

                      For the equestrian portion, you can organize it in different formats. On mine I chose to do 3 sections (national awards/placings, zone awards/placings, and state level awards/placings). Within each section I listed my awards chronologically (newest to oldest). I competed in more than one discipline but still listed those together, however you could also organize your resume by separating the different disciplines (whatever works for you).

                      *Its very important that you list what abbreviations mean. For example, don't write "USEF HOTY". You should write out "United States Equestrian Federation Horse of the Year". After you have written the long version, you can abbreviate it after that. This is especially important with state/lower level organization abbreviations which may be unfamiliar to some people.

                      Keep it as short and to the point as possible (unlike this post). Be professional. Don't use the word "I" or "me" etc. Spell check, spell check, spell check! Put your name, address, phone number and email (usually in that order). Use normal font styles and it is nice to buy resume paper as opposed to the regular printing paper.

                      Comment

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