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Tips for nailing the jumpoff!

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  • Tips for nailing the jumpoff!

    One left, ahh yes! clear round! but oh no where do i go, what turns do i take in the jumpoff?

    What are your tips for nailing the jumpoff? How do you find neat inside turns to take?

  • #2
    You need to make your jump off plan when you walk, and note all the landmarks for your turns. After that, it's important to watch any horses that may go before you, to see how the turns ride and where you can be faster and tighter. It's also extremely important to know where the start and finish timers are, since that tells you where you need to pick up your pace and where the shortest lines to cut the timers are from the jumps. Check your course in the morning, often the jump offs are similar to earlier classes and you will have more time to see how elements ride.

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by EquitationRider View Post
      One left, ahh yes! clear round! but oh no where do i go, what turns do i take in the jumpoff?

      What are your tips for nailing the jumpoff? How do you find neat inside turns to take?
      dont go 1st- when in a jump off, a as if you do you have to set the pace which could be beaten if you lack expereince put your name down closes to the end on the board that way you know what times you will have to beat and not many others comming up behind you

      then watch each entrance- warm up your horse just before you have to go in
      do keep on and on and on or over jump him in the warm up or practice area
      you want your horse to be responsive and alert- and also want him to be freash not worn out via keeping on at him till your time is in for the class

      dont over do the practice jumps just do one or two then leave it at that

      watch the course- watch the errors as well as the clear rounds, as the errors will tell you what not to do, if for exsample someone over shot a triple section on the 1st fence part they will not make the last part
      as some one esle said when you wlak the course then look at the best line to take for each jump plus the landings

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by goeslikestink View Post
        dont go 1st- when in a jump off, a as if you do you have to set the pace which could be beaten if you lack expereince put your name down closes to the end on the board that way you know what times you will have to beat and not many others comming up behind you

        then watch each entrance- warm up your horse just before you have to go in
        do keep on and on and on or over jump him in the warm up or practice area
        you want your horse to be responsive and alert- and also want him to be freash not worn out via keeping on at him till your time is in for the class

        dont over do the practice jumps just do one or two then leave it at that

        watch the course- watch the errors as well as the clear rounds, as the errors will tell you what not to do, if for exsample someone over shot a triple section on the 1st fence part they will not make the last part
        as some one esle said when you wlak the course then look at the best line to take for each jump plus the landings
        One does not get to choose their order for the jump off. While going at the end can be an advantage because if no one has successfully been quick and clear then you can take a less risky route and still win if clear, going first/early can be an advantage too. If you can lay down a great trip, others will make really risky moves/ difficult inside turns or leave outs in an attempt to catch you, which often results in rails or even run outs or stops.

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        • #5
          Depending on your horse you may have one that does well with the forward more gallopy courses or one that does well with the turning courses. My former jumper was a turner and we would place high if the course involved a lot of places where I could turn inside. it is was a course where you had to gallop to win we did not do so well.

          A lady who rode with me taught me how to walk a turn backwards. My horse needed two straight strides for a verticle and three for an oxer. By walking the turn from backwards I knew where I had to turn and be straight. Worked well for me.

          Also he learned that when I said Whoa quietly over a fence and turned my head one way that we were going to tun that way. As I said he could turn on a dime and a couple of times I got turned off.

          Just a couple of hints that worked well for me on a horse that was a tad short strided and not one to really gallop but could really turn.

          Have fun. Like others said plan everything when you walk the course and get to really know your horse.

          Comment


          • #6
            A lot of the jump off is not a skill to just acquire with your clear round, you need to have a grasp of the ride required before you get there.

            One thing I feel is most important is your horses adjustability. Without a strong whoa and a quick response to the move up, you might as well ride it like a first round (which isn't a bad thing until you get the hang of it). The turning is not as difficult when you are in control of the horse.

            Look for options during your course walk which are at your skill level. The lower level kamikazee moves are not for the beginning jumper rider. Many a time a little foot speed will beat a hard turn.

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            • #7
              While you're riding the course, mentally think ahead - not just what jump you're going to, but how you want to ride it. I think a lot of the scary jumper rounds you see at the lower levels are the result of getting overexcited and failing to think about what's coming next. You won't have to rip your horse's mouth through a turn or gun him for a flyer of a distance if you are always thinking one jump ahead.

              Comment

              • Original Poster

                #8
                Originally posted by norcalammie View Post
                Depending on your horse you may have one that does well with the forward more gallopy courses or one that does well with the turning courses. My former jumper was a turner and we would place high if the course involved a lot of places where I could turn inside. it is was a course where you had to gallop to win we did not do so well.

                A lady who rode with me taught me how to walk a turn backwards. My horse needed two straight strides for a verticle and three for an oxer. By walking the turn from backwards I knew where I had to turn and be straight. Worked well for me.

                Also he learned that when I said Whoa quietly over a fence and turned my head one way that we were going to tun that way. As I said he could turn on a dime and a couple of times I got turned off.

                Just a couple of hints that worked well for me on a horse that was a tad short strided and not one to really gallop but could really turn.

                Have fun. Like others said plan everything when you walk the course and get to really know your horse.
                I used to show Pony Jumpers,but took a break when i started at a new barn with new horse a few years ago. I have now been riding my horse for 3 years and he is a very experienced jumper.(has competed up to 4'9") he is very long strided but can package and turn on the dime, he also responds very well to half halts, move ups, packages. only big thing is he sometimes surges three strides back but will come back easily. I have a good eye and can react in an instant if needed. I am competeing in the 3'6"-3'9" jumpers. i was just wondering about any tricks and tips since i have been in the equitation ring for a while instead of the jumpers

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by EquitationRider View Post
                  One left, ahh yes! clear round! but oh no where do i go, what turns do i take in the jumpoff?

                  What are your tips for nailing the jumpoff? How do you find neat inside turns to take?
                  Ride it like you stole it!
                  Originally posted by The Centaurian
                  As far as I am concerned, leadline is a legitimate reason to have children.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Roxy SM View Post
                    One does not get to choose their order for the jump off. While going at the end can be an advantage because if no one has successfully been quick and clear then you can take a less risky route and still win if clear, going first/early can be an advantage too. If you can lay down a great trip, others will make really risky moves/ difficult inside turns or leave outs in an attempt to catch you, which often results in rails or even run outs or stops.
                    some classes do depending on type of classif low keyed stuff then its a no on a broad here, can be a chosey if affliated then its not drawn order only
                    depends like isad but amin uk so rules a bit different
                    agree with what you said
                    all comes down to how you are trianed or how you trian your horse and if you know how to pace the distnaces it between each jump
                    as for poles down luck of the game that is why we enter the classes in the 1st place to have lots of fun
                    op- expeince helps dont worry if you dont win, winning isnt the be all and end all----- trying is, having fun, is, gaining valuable ring expreince is for you and your horse, if you win then its a bonus as a job well done
                    but its like anything else its a game of chance you win you lose butlose graciously

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      I agree with norcalammie.

                      You have to know your horse and know how the horse will react to the course.

                      The key to a good jump-off is to develop your plan while you walk and then execute it precisely. One tip I've learned over the years...ALWAYS get your pace going before the start timers (i.e. start your plan at the point where you walk into the ring, not AT the first fence). Loping to the first fence in the jump off will waste valuable time.

                      As for knowing your horse, I have one horse that is a "turner" and one that's a "galloper." My turner is absolutely brilliant at turning after a jump. She can sit and turn on the landing stride and it's a pretty safe bet that we can win the class if the jump-off has some good twists and turns....especially if there's an "impossible" turn somewhere on course. She's also willing to jump a fence without ever getting her eye on it, but it's harder in the AOs for her since she's not the scopiest thing out there. When the course is a gallopy one, we're almost always beat by the horses with a bigger step.

                      With my horse that has a huge step the turny courses are more of a challenge. But a spread out course with a few big gallops gives him an advantage. But then since we're pretty much still trying to survive the 1.40s, I haven't tested him much on the turning side of things (I'm not sure *I* would survive that on him! ).

                      I guess you just have to recognize that each horse has a strength. Oversimplified, your horse can either gallop or turn, but there are a lot of variations within those two types. It's rare to find a horse that truly can do both because a shorter step is often what leads a horse to turn better and the bigger step often precludes the ability to be as handy as the short strided horse. Adjustability is hugely important, but if you know your horse's type and strength you can play to it in a jump-off. For example, if you horse has a huge step you might choose to gallop around a fence where the turn is a little bit hinky (like you have to weave a little around something) because with a big-stepped horse the gallop option might save you time over trying to package up the horse and get to the jump from a tight turn. On my gelding I always gallop around and on my mare I always pick the crazy turns (we can't win otherwise). In other words, it's not always the tightest turns that win. And understanding HOW your horse covers ground quickly will allow you to figure out which choice to take.

                      Once you've figured out your horse you can develop a solid plan for the jump off when you walk the course. And that's what the really successful jumper riders do.
                      __________________________________
                      Flying F Sport Horses
                      Horses in the NW

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                      • #12
                        this is where all the flat work lengthening and shortening (adding and subtracting ) strides over ground rails pays off. Your horse is in tune to your mind, you already can open and close the bend of your arc and you always ride looking ahead to the next jump. You know the difference between faster long strides and quick short strides. You ride with impulsion and can control the power. and you can do a 3 step turn to any fence on the planet.
                        "The Desire to Win is worthless without the Desire to Prepare"

                        It's a "KILT". If I wore something underneath, it would be a "SKIRT".

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Lostboy View Post
                          this is where all the flat work lengthening and shortening (adding and subtracting ) strides over ground rails pays off. Your horse is in tune to your mind, you already can open and close the bend of your arc and you always ride looking ahead to the next jump. You know the difference between faster long strides and quick short strides. You ride with impulsion and can control the power. and you can do a 3 step turn to any fence on the planet.
                          This! When I was working with Tim Stockdale in England, he emphasized working on extending down the long side and then shortening on the short side. We also practiced a lot of 1/4 canter pirouquettes and then accelerating to a pole to practice "mock jump offs". He always said that the time turns will be fairly uniform i.e- everyone is more than likely going to do the same turns, however the key was the rate of acceleration from coming back to make the turn to the jump is where you will win the class.
                          Ryu Equestrian & Facebook Page
                          Breeding Horses Today, for the Equestrian Sport of Tomorrow.
                          Osteen & Gainesville, Florida.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            The real key, IMO, is to ride the shortest track possible - if you can leave a step or two out of a turn by being smart about it (having your horse well in hand *before* the turn, so you "spin" or "flow" as required, but with precision), you'll almost always beat the folks who're less organized but perhaps foot-faster.

                            And yes, plan your jumpoff when you walk the course. Do make sure you watch others do the jumpoff if you have the chance - it might give you other ideas about the track, or show you problems you hadn't considered.

                            If you see a "McClain" trick (jumping something in the ring that's not a real jump, because it's the fastest track to the next fence), make sure you check with the steward to determine that jumping it is allowed before you count on being able to do it!

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by paw View Post
                              The real key, IMO, is to ride the shortest track possible - if you can leave a step or two out of a turn by being smart about it (having your horse well in hand *before* the turn, so you "spin" or "flow" as required, but with precision), you'll almost always beat the folks who're less organized but perhaps foot-faster.
                              I have to agree with this, the shortest possible track, and leaving out strides when you can.

                              You may get a MC opportunity in a jump off, but I think most modern courses are designed to give the horse and rider a couple track options and not much more, especially the majority of FEI classes.

                              However training for opportunities, and knowing your horses assets are very important as well. A horse that understands how to jump across a fence or turn in the air has an advantage in a jump off, knowing that your ride can flat out gallop to a huge vertical and not get flat is an advantage on some courses, a horse that understands the subtleties of whoa helps, knowing how to jump in hand helps when the fences get big and the pace to impulsion ration gets thin, things like these, and of course having a horse that hates splinters help a ton in a jump-off.

                              Bottom line choose your track well, train for jump-offs, and stay within the horses capabilities and you will get your share of jump-off's.

                              Comment


                              • #16
                                Originally posted by paw View Post
                                If you see a "McClain" trick (jumping something in the ring that's not a real jump, because it's the fastest track to the next fence), make sure you check with the steward to determine that jumping it is allowed before you count on being able to do it!
                                When/what horse did he do this on? And is there a video on youtube? Sounds very cool.

                                Comment


                                • #17
                                  Originally posted by SkipChange View Post
                                  When/what horse did he do this on? And is there a video on youtube? Sounds very cool.
                                  Go and look for the jump off in the Olympics....must be on You Tube somewhere!
                                  Go Ahead: This is a dare, not permission. Don't Do It!

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