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I had a GREAT lesson today...Anyone Else?

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  • I had a GREAT lesson today...Anyone Else?

    I just have to share this with some folks that will understand this and appreciate it too.

    A little background but I will try to keep it brief. I have had my OTTB for almost 5 years. It's been a rough go as he has allergies and the first 3 years I essentially stopped riding him from April through October. But we have been persevering the last year plus and maybe finally getting somewhere.

    For the past year I have shown him at some local shows doing 2' and once in a while 2'3". I want to move up to 2'6" but we had a tough winter and I keep my guy Petey at home. I trailer him in for lessons and meet my trainer at local shows. I haven't jumped more than 2'3" in probably 5+ years and am not as young as I once was.

    So anyways, Petey was having some allergy issues today for my lesson but he was still trying to be good. There was an oxer set up in the middle of the ring at 2' to start. I was cantering it doing a figure 8 over the oxer. Petey & I did 2' really well. My trainer raised it 2'3" and told me to ignore that is was higher, just keep riding it the same way. Petey was being a trooper even though his allergies were bothering him some.

    Then my trainer raised it to 2'6" and asked me to continue on the figure 8's over it. UGH, I got a little nervous. Petey was being good even though we didn't quite get the oxer as well as before. But all in all, not too bad. That is the first time Petey had ever done 2'6"!!!! We got a few good jumps but it will take a little more time for me to feel comfortable at 2'6" again. But I'm so proud of Petey and ME!!!!!

    Oh, my trainer video one jump with her phone and we looked pretty good. I don't have the video but she wanted to prove to me that we looked good!!!

    I know 2'6" doesn't seem like much to many people but it's a step for me to bigger and better things.

    Anyone else have a good lesson today??? Or a good show????
    Last edited by Green Acres; May. 8, 2010, 07:28 PM.

  • #2
    GOOD for you & Petey !!! You should be so PROUD !!!!
    No show or lesson today -- Farrier here all day ! ARUGH !!!
    Last edited by Zu Zu; May. 8, 2010, 07:04 PM. Reason: addition
    Zu Zu Bailey " IT'S A WONDERFUL LIFE ! "

    Comment


    • #3
      Glad you had a great lesson!

      I'm new on the board, but I wanted to say I had a great lesson too! I haven't taken lessons in a couple of years since my horse has been in Cali while I was away at school, but we're finally in the same place!

      Ours was a tough lesson. It was too complicated to explain with words, I would need a diagram. It was a lot of training your eye, landing on the correct lead, and jumping diagonally over fences (hard!). I was just happy that me and my boy held our own againt the other riders who have been riding consistently for the last few years.

      AND we made it over some 3' fences without any refusals or anything too dire happening. Although I did feel like he was jumping me out of the tack almost everytime. I could just hear him say, "Whoa, Mom, those look enormous!" and would then proceed to jump them 6 inches bigger than needed.

      All in all, it was a great lesson and it's nice to finish and think, wow, we really worked hard today and learned a lot!

      Comment


      • #4
        I had a great lesson too!

        I rode our 6 year old mare, who I haven't ridden in 8 months in a lesson with co-owner Aaron Vale.

        Although we didn't jump at competition height and kept it small, it was great to feel how much she has progressed and matured while in training with him.

        Video
        Ryu Equestrian & Facebook Page
        Breeding Horses Today, for the Equestrian Sport of Tomorrow.
        Osteen & Gainesville, Florida.

        Comment


        • #5
          Had a great show, not me showing but four of my students and they all took champion in their divisions, which really made me happy! Especially one girl who was in Young Entry this was her FIRST ever course at a show and first time cantering an entire course, and she did great, of course her 21 yr old horse is a trooper, but still she has overcome a lot of fear issues from a prior bad episode (a trainer putting a 7 yr old kid on a barely broke 3 yr old!) a few years ago, so it was a BIG deal to her! She has gotten SUCH confidence from this wonderful saintly hony, he has taught almost all of my students to show and jump! And this was a hrose that came to me 6 years ago so lame he could hardly walk (and is now 100% sound on no meds etc!). So yes, a great day for me! Tomorrow another show with another student and I am actually going to show my big horse, haven't gotten to show much at all, and having bad problems with one hip, but still going to tough it out!
          www.shawneeacres.net

          Comment


          • #6
            I had a great lesson too! In fact, I'm STILL smiling, 10 hours later!!

            Comment


            • #7
              I think a big part of the joy in riding is the process... I had a great lesson today and Wednesday.

              I feel my lessons are getting better and better because of some positive changes - Saddle change, wearing my boots instead of my half chaps, and a great trainer.

              It was really warm and I was working in the barn really hard all day, then took a lesson. My trainer could tell I was tired... but said I rode really well.

              We are working on a 12 stride.. uugggg. One of my horses is 16 2, decent size and "has" a 12 stride but likes to drift in the line and it messes everything up..... were getting better!!!

              My other horse has NO problem making the strides in the lines.. none whatsoever....
              Live in the sunshine.
              Swim in the sea.
              Drink the wild air.

              Comment


              • #8
                Friday the OTTB and I went to schooling day at this week end's show. He was so very brave and good. We jumped all the jumps in the pony ring-with no stopping, or even hard stares!! While they were tiny, there were gates, walls and flower boxes he'd never seen before. Maybe we've turned a corner??

                He also didn't run over any ponies or buck me off, both very good points. Our instructor was proud of both of us-it's great when the hard works starts paying off!

                Comment


                • #9
                  I can't ride for a few more months, but the lovely 13 year old girl who is riding my boy for me had a GREAT lesson Friday. And, she's heading for her first hunter show ever on Sunday! She comes from the land of Western and Gaming, but has an amazing base and basics, and has learned to jump in short order. My boy tends to tow her around a bit (I out weigh her by....a lot...) and he knows it, but she's got it worked out pretty well. I finally get to be a horse show mom! I am nervous and a tad bit jealous right now.
                  Proud member of the "Don't rush to kill wildlife" clique!

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                  • #10
                    Hooray for you!! 2'6" is actually my goal for 2010 (our trainer has us fill out goal sheets at the beginning of each year) and so for me, 2'6" is big too!! Congrats to you and Petey!!

                    I had an awesome lesson yesterday.. I'm still sitting in the "comfort zone" of 2'-2'3" and have always been more of the slow pace type.. in a 3 stride line I'll usually end up getting 5 strides just cause i get nervous and hesitate. Even though I ride some of the best school horses out there, sometimes my nerves still get the best of me. But yesterday I had a new found source of confidence and got the 3 EVERY single time!! I'm just a lesson student that rides once a week so those "little" feats are HUGE for me and I just love it. I've only been in a h/j barn for two years so still getting comfortable jumping.. and when I have lessons that are really FUN it makes me so happy to be doing this!

                    Happy to hear about everyone else's great lessons too!

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Great to hear everyone's good news! It really is something when things come together.

                      I have an OTTB and she is currently off work but it's anticipated that she will be ready to start back perhaps as early as two weeks. We were jumping 2' - 2'3" when I was last riding her. Will definitely be taking it easy with her and not doing any jumping until she gets back into shape. However, I am very much looking forward to getting back to where we left off and then moving up to 2'6 and above. The highest I have ever jumped was probably slightly over 3' when I was a teenager- and once a few years ago on a horse I was leasing. My trainer thinks my girl can jump 3' from a trot. I would be thrilled if I were able to jump 3' consistently with her. But we have plenty of time and there is no rush.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Yay to everyone! We too had a GREAT day! Not a lesson, but our first cross country school! My guy is an OTTB as well, and had never jumped a jump 18 months ago. Today he schooled a train, a tabletop, a ditch, a bank, and a water complex along with misc. log jumps. It was SO MUCH FUN, and just had a great day.
                        http://tailsoftheottb.blogspot.com

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          I had a great Saturday too! My critter's first time back jumping a course since she was laid up in November with an injury. We'd hauled in for two lessons prior to this and jumped around some 2' stuff to get re-organized and my trainer has really asked me to work on stepping into my outside stirrup. So we get our two 2'6 trips in at the show, I step into my outside stirrup, wait for it and the lead changes happened with no drama! It was a big division for a local show and we pinned in all three classes, even with the wind blowing things around and almost getting knocked in the head when a tree branch got hit with a downburst. I was thrilled with the way she went! Here's to more of a great Spring!
                          "Beware the hobby that eats."
                          Benjamin Franklin

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            I'm a bit jealous of all the accomplishments everyone is making with their horses. I lost my wonderful, easy, lovely little grey the end of April, and have been riding a very talent but difficult TB mare in his stead. She's progressing by leaps and bounds, and we have just started semi-consistent lessons with a very good rider and coach. I'm now at the point where I need to start filling in holes that I've left in this mare's foundation, and it's tough... She's hot, so I had fallen into the trap of trying to ride her very quietly as to avoid that hotness. I'm not allowed to do that now, and although I understand this is the type of work she needs in order to become ridable (and I see glimpses every once in a while of what it will be like when we finally get through this nonsense!), but the tantrums are getting old.

                            I try so hard not to compare her to my darling little grey, but it is difficult sometimes. He was hot too, but would turn himself inside out to please. She's just a bit more of a diva - a good girl, but isn't quite as generous as he was. I know that the path we're heading down will lead to a soft, ridable and more generous horse, but there's some awfully big pot holes on this road!

                            I don't mean to make my rides sound like a disaster. She really is a good girl, but smart, athletic and a bit difficult, which make for some interesting rides. She's just such a contrast to Peanut, who was also smart and athletic, but so, so anxious to please.

                            Alright, someone give me a kick in the butt to get out of my melancholy rut, and tell me that the mare will be wonderful if I just keep at it! She's getting there, but I sometimes wish I could just shake her by her cheek pieces and explain how much nicer for all it would be if she'd just take a deep breath and settle!

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Small Change View Post
                              I sometimes wish I could just shake her by her cheek pieces and explain how much nicer for all it would be if she'd just take a deep breath and settle!
                              Sorry to hear about your wonderful grey horse, I'm sure you're still feeling that hole and will for a long time to come. Take heart with the mare though, it will come in time. During the first year I owned my mare I would have loved to knock some sense in her and there were times I lost my temper... for which I am very ashamed that I did. Took her what seemed like an eternity to mature, but mentally she finally started to "get it" in her six-year-old year. She's turning into quite the nice little horse and I'm seriously re-thinking her status as an eventual sale horse. And FWIW, she's a Selle Francais/TB mare... super hot, super sensitive, super talented, very much the drama queen, and very opinionated. If she came 'round anyone can!
                              "Beware the hobby that eats."
                              Benjamin Franklin

                              Comment


                              • #16
                                Originally posted by Small Change View Post
                                I'm a bit jealous of all the accomplishments everyone is making with their horses. I lost my wonderful, easy, lovely little grey the end of April, and have been riding a very talent but difficult TB mare in his stead. She's progressing by leaps and bounds, and we have just started semi-consistent lessons with a very good rider and coach. I'm now at the point where I need to start filling in holes that I've left in this mare's foundation, and it's tough... She's hot, so I had fallen into the trap of trying to ride her very quietly as to avoid that hotness. I'm not allowed to do that now, and although I understand this is the type of work she needs in order to become ridable (and I see glimpses every once in a while of what it will be like when we finally get through this nonsense!), but the tantrums are getting old.

                                I try so hard not to compare her to my darling little grey, but it is difficult sometimes. He was hot too, but would turn himself inside out to please. She's just a bit more of a diva - a good girl, but isn't quite as generous as he was. I know that the path we're heading down will lead to a soft, ridable and more generous horse, but there's some awfully big pot holes on this road!

                                I don't mean to make my rides sound like a disaster. She really is a good girl, but smart, athletic and a bit difficult, which make for some interesting rides. She's just such a contrast to Peanut, who was also smart and athletic, but so, so anxious to please.

                                Alright, someone give me a kick in the butt to get out of my melancholy rut, and tell me that the mare will be wonderful if I just keep at it! She's getting there, but I sometimes wish I could just shake her by her cheek pieces and explain how much nicer for all it would be if she'd just take a deep breath and settle!

                                (((Kicking your butt))))

                                I understand what you are saying. I started riding my TB/Appy when I was young - he was young; after riding my sweet little QH mare when she foundered...... I thought it would never come together... it did and he was the greatest horse ever! THEN he aged - - Bought a weanling.... uggg... Now that same weanling is 11; riding him is awesome... after my TB/Appy passed. I now have a 18 hand; poorly trained horse I am working with...

                                My story is to say: each horse is different and teaches you something you need to learn.

                                I have seen this happen over the years w/ other riders too. So your not alone. I feel its just a way the older horse tells you it's time to move on and start riding that green bean that you would probably let sit if the older horse didn't force your hand.

                                We are so blessed just to get to be around such wonderful animals. And just know, you are not alone... enjoy learning what your new mount has to teach you!
                                Live in the sunshine.
                                Swim in the sea.
                                Drink the wild air.

                                Comment


                                • #17
                                  JumpWithPanache and doublestable - Thanks guys. She's a good girl, and she will come along, but the learning curve is a steep one! JWP, I've managed to keep my cool with her (for self-preservation as much as anything sometimes!), but sometimes the mental image of shaking her pretty little head by the cheek pieces is awfully tempting! I'm sure there are times when she is just dying to shake me by my helmet harness, telling me that it would be nicer for all if we just indulged her inner steeplechaser!

                                  doublestable - You are so right. If I still had my little grey with me, it would be all too easy to take him out instead of putting the time in on her. I'm sure he's looking down from under his heavenly apple tree though, absolutely horrified by Darla's bad behaviour. Who knows though, maybe in time I'll be repeating this post, wishing that whatever little horse I've started riding would be as sensible as Darla. I can hope, right?

                                  Comment


                                  • #18
                                    Originally posted by Small Change View Post
                                    JumpWithPanache and doublestable - Thanks guys. She's a good girl, and she will come along, but the learning curve is a steep one! JWP, I've managed to keep my cool with her (for self-preservation as much as anything sometimes!), but sometimes the mental image of shaking her pretty little head by the cheek pieces is awfully tempting! I'm sure there are times when she is just dying to shake me by my helmet harness, telling me that it would be nicer for all if we just indulged her inner steeplechaser!

                                    doublestable - You are so right. If I still had my little grey with me, it would be all too easy to take him out instead of putting the time in on her. I'm sure he's looking down from under his heavenly apple tree though, absolutely horrified by Darla's bad behaviour. Who knows though, maybe in time I'll be repeating this post, wishing that whatever little horse I've started riding would be as sensible as Darla. I can hope, right?

                                    It will come! My TB/Appy was an absolute terror on hooves as a three year old.... He bucked me off, took off with me... you name it..... When he passed at 40 years old, it was a great loss in my heart and I never thought I would get to ride another horse as good as he was... so I remember back when he was three... I didn't want to even ride him.

                                    Then, my weanling - yeah, drug me across the ground when long lining - etc.... but now - he's a great friend.

                                    I am now working on another - and it was so neat; last night I was sad because I had a bad mothers day - went to the barn and he wouldn't eat... he followed me around and actually put his HUGE head under my arm... he knew something was wrong. It made me cry, but so happy that we are developing that special bond. I never thought it would happen. It's been TWO YEARS.....

                                    I know I am hijacking - (sorry) but words of encouragement - these things take time.... and we cannot expect it to happen when we want to... it just happens when it happens.
                                    Live in the sunshine.
                                    Swim in the sea.
                                    Drink the wild air.

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