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How many jumps do you take for a warm up?

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  • How many jumps do you take for a warm up?

    After reading various threads on "how much is too much" and "riding routines" I have come up with a new question! (I hope or someone can just re-direct to the old thread!) OH and this months In-Stride about safe shows....

    When you are at shows what/how many jumps do you take before going into the ring?

    Do you do a few x rails a few 2' a few 2'6" etc and work your way up are do you do a few low and a few at height etc?....

    I know for example that my horse has to jump ONE fence at height other wise he will go in the ring lazy as can be and totally get caught off guard and knock the first rail from here to the next county!

    SO I come out W/T/C both directions catch a couple that are under 2'6" (like two or three) to get him moving and jumping then I will do one or two at mid height and end with one or two jumps at height....So all together maybe 6 jumps max....

    Warm up day and warm up morning I catch a few low ones and if he's good buzz around the course once or twice then we are done. I see many trainers who jump the courses over and over and over. If my horse is marching quietly around I don't see why I should do more!

  • #2
    I don't usually school over jumps on schooling day. If the horse needs to see the ring and the jumps I'll hack them in the ring. The only exception is if I have a green horse showing over little jumps and I'm using the schooling day in the same way as the classes (i.e. as another chance to get around a set of jumps).

    With my AO mare (typically showing in the lows/1.30m) I jump a maximum of 5 fences before walking into the ring. My goal is to do one at-height rampy oxer. So I start at 3'3" or 3'6" (with an oxer) and then go up 3 or 4 times (raising each side every other time) ending up at 4'3" or 4'6". I do, of course, warm up pretty seriously on the flat with a fair amount of lateral work since I want the horse ready to go.....I just don't want to waste her on warm-up jumps. And I never jump a vertical after the oxer.....she doesn't need it (though I often feel like the only jumper not finishing on a vertical!).

    With my TB gelding I jump however many it takes to have him feel "right" before walking into the ring. At the show we did last week I jumped 4 or 5 jumps (starting at 3'6" and ending at 4'6") on the first two days of the show before walking into our 1.40m classes. On the evening of the GP he was a nutcase in the schooling ring and we jumped maybe 6 or 7 jumps before I walked the course. I jumped 3 more jumps when the horse before me walked into the ring. So a total of maybe 10 jumps? And with him I jump an oxer every time and then end on whatever the first fence in the course is. So if the first fence is a vertical we'll do an at-height vertical after our last oxer.

    With my green horses jumping little jumps the number can be anywhere from zero (I'll often skip warm up jumps if we're heading into a little class that's not much of an effort for the horse) to maybe 10 if I have a particular issue we're working on.
    __________________________________
    Flying F Sport Horses
    Horses in the NW

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    • #3
      Well I haven't shown for awhile, but whenever I did my old trainer was big on keeping routine. On schooling day she would give us a lesson just like at home, 20 minutes or so of flatwork followed by 20 minutes or so of jumping, starting with singles and working up to a course. It relaxed the horses into their usual work routine and got them focused. On show day, she'd have us lunge/hack (depending on what the horses needed) and then school us over single jumps. She would always end the jumping with a fence or two that was a tid bit higher than those in the class so the horses and riders were on their A game. That's her plan of action, and it worked well for me.
      "Lord if we should fall, my horse and I, please pick my horse up first."

      www.thestartbox.wordpress.com
      www.useaiv.org

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      • #4
        In the warm-up area, I usually do 5 to 10, depending on how well we are doing. We do as few as possible. I show at 3', so we'll usually do one or two verticals at 2'6"ish, then a couple of oxers a little higher, then a taller vertical if needed.
        ~ Citizens for a Kinder, Gentler COTH...our mantra: Be nice. ~

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        • #5
          Nikki does 6 to 8 jumps in the warm up ring and very little flatwork right before my class. I take her out in the morning and do a real flat school on her, but I cannot do that just prior to going in the ring - she gets cranky about it and then I have an angry redheaded TB mare on my hands. We usually start her over a small square oxer (3' or so) and work that up to about 4'3 and then end with a very tall vertical to try and get a rail. It almost never works and that sucker has gotten very big...but we try and it does get her sharp.
          http://www.youtube.com/user/supershorty628
          Proudly blogging for The Chronicle of the Horse!

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          • #6
            When I would school right before going into the show ring my trainer would actually have me intentionally miss a distance. I was notorious for being perfect in the schooling ring and then missing in the show ring. So I would do about 2-3 perfect jumps and one oops.
            Punch!
            http://community.webshots.com/user/punch2800

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            • #7
              I am something of a minimalist when it comes to warm up jumps. It is very rare for me to jump more than 2 or 3 fences in the schooling area. My horse is made and brave and so all I am doing with the warm up jumps is making sure I have the right canter.

              I do flat a bit prior to the first class, maybe ten minutes or so of WTC.
              **********
              We move pretty fast for some rabid garden snails.
              -PaulaEdwina

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              • #8
                My mare tends to get really slow at shows so I do as little as possible before going in the ring. Lots of walking, a little trot and canter to make sure she is listening to my leg, and then we hop over 3-4 jumps. We jump 2' - 2'6, so we warm up at that height. If there are problems, like not being straight, right before our class, my trainer does like me to school that before going into the ring. That is a fine line - if we get a little tired during warm-up, we don't have a good trip, so the schooling ends up being kinda pointless.
                My blog: Journeys in Riding

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                • Original Poster

                  #9
                  Originally posted by Lucassb View Post
                  I am something of a minimalist when it comes to warm up jumps. It is very rare for me to jump more than 2 or 3 fences in the schooling area. My horse is made and brave and so all I am doing with the warm up jumps is making sure I have the right canter.

                  I do flat a bit prior to the first class, maybe ten minutes or so of WTC.
                  I'm jealous! My horse is not yet "made" although we are getting there! Hence the schooling over the course morning of and night before! He "needs" to see those fences!

                  I find it interesting that you have a lot of people starting off @ 3' for the warm up (granted they are ending higher too...) and only doing a few jumps before going in and jumping some big courses.

                  When reading about everyone's routines at home it seemed like there was a lot of time given to warm up... Ex) walk ten minutes, trot each direction for ten minutes do some laterals for ten minutes THEN canter for a few laps.... Then start with a small 2' single, work your way up to a line then a course then adjust the height...yes I am exaggerating, and yes I know that working on all those elements is important it just made me feel like I wasn't warming my horse up ENOUGH at shows!

                  I also got some pretty strange looks at my last show when I came out flated 10 minutes (he had already been worked in the AM and this was 10 or 11 AM) took 3 jumps and went in to the ring! And my horse was better then his previous 2 shows!

                  Ok I am so rambling......

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                  • #10
                    I'm a "less is more" person, partly because my first hunter was a bit keen, and you really didn't want to get his engine up and humming in the w/u ring. The idea was to sneak in 20 fences (4 in the schooling area and 16 for your division, this was before w/u classes!) before he woke up.

                    With the one I just retired, his form is pretty consistent and his jump is his jump. I usually schooled about 6 fences on him and finished with a vertical one hole higher than the class with the cooler draped over it. If I nailed that perfectly off the same lead as the first fence on course, we called it quits, otherwise gave it one more shot. That last fence was for me, not the horse. He's a careful horse and has a lot of natural backup at the fence. That makes for a winning round if there is no pilot error (hah!), but that first fence on course is an entirely different feeling from the fences in the warm up ring. Once I figured out how to create that feeling in the warm up ring, our courses improved considerably.
                    Your crazy is showing. You might want to tuck that back in.

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                    • #11
                      As few as possible. Both of mine tend to get hyped when you jump, so the more we do, the more horse I have to contend with. Sometimes just one or two.
                      A proud friend of bar.ka.

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                      • #12
                        My horse was doing local one day shows last year and our routine was generally as follows:

                        Arrive for morning schooling, flat about 15 minutes to warm up and see the sights. School over a few fences, particularly those which might approach akwardly or be jumped from both directions. I try to not ride more than five to eight fences and halt quietly after the fence or line. Before the division, I walk her for a while on a nice loose rein, kind of taking a tour to loosen the muscles out. Then we go into the warm-up ring, trot a few minutes, canter a lap, hop over a low fence, halt, canter once fence at height to the left. Left is her harder direction and I try to reinforce landing on the left lead. If I jump her over the show fences too much she gets dull. She jumps phenomenally the first time she sees a fence.
                        "Beware the hobby that eats."
                        Benjamin Franklin

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                        • #13
                          When I was doing the 3' Adults, if I had flatted for 20 minutes, jumped for 20 minutes and then gone in for 3 rounds then an under saddle??? Need a wheelbarrow to get the horse out of the ring...and they would not have had a fond memory of what happened at the show.

                          What I did do if I had one a little less experienced or fresh is break up the flat work with an early AM session hacking out if we were at KHP where that's an option. Or a solid 30 minutes of flat in a ring. Then back to the stall until about 30 minutes before the trip-or about 15 trips out on the gate sheet.

                          My standard warm up is about 10 minutes W-T-C. Few leg yields and up/down trot canter transitions. Vertical at about 2'6", halt. Come around the other direction, halt. Then raise it up and come all the way around, circle back over it. Then add the oxer once each way off a continuing canter. MAYBE raise the vertical a little above class height and take it off the same lead as the first fence to sharpen depending on how they warmed up. Then go in the ring. What is that? 6? had issues in warm up sometimes but NEVER anything more jumping was going to fix. more flatwork or a lunge, maybe. Not more jumping.

                          I may be different but I like mine a little sharper then ideal in my first class so I have something left for the second, particularly in the summer. Sure don't want them perfect if I am doing a warm up round-that is what they are for.

                          One thing...sometimes people ask about why this or that horse beat theirs when the answer is simply they presented a dull and tired horse. So overdoing it is a bigger problem then being a touch fresh.

                          Do your homework. Teach them at home. Get up and ride in the early AM. Don't try to fix problems in that warm up ring at a show.
                          When opportunity knocks it's wearing overalls and looks like work.

                          The horse world. Two people. Three opinions.

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                          • #14
                            I actually get anxious in the schooling ring. I prefer to do as little as possible and go I also try to find a quiet place to do most of my flatwork to warm up. My goal is to trot one and then canter about 3....then in I go Otherwise, both of us get fried in the warm up area. My mare and I both tend to be the nervous types

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by findeight View Post
                              When I was doing the 3' Adults, if I had flatted for 20 minutes, jumped for 20 minutes and then gone in for 3 rounds then an under saddle??? Need a wheelbarrow to get the horse out of the ring...and they would not have had a fond memory of what happened at the show.
                              I dunno if you were referring to my post, but in case you were I was referring to schooling day not show day.
                              "Lord if we should fall, my horse and I, please pick my horse up first."

                              www.thestartbox.wordpress.com
                              www.useaiv.org

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                              • #16
                                Originally posted by nlk View Post
                                ...When you are at shows what/how many jumps do you take before going into the ring?
                                Sorry mustang, I thought you were referring to the OPs question. Not schooling only day.
                                When opportunity knocks it's wearing overalls and looks like work.

                                The horse world. Two people. Three opinions.

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                                • #17
                                  I presume that you mean "what do you do in the warm-up ring before you show."

                                  I do as little as possible to warm up - right before I go in the ring is not the time to do much "schooling" or training. We might make a point of something by maybe jumping on a little angle, or only jumping verticals, but leave the jumps for the show ring.

                                  Do a flat to warm up the horse (10 minutes?), and then a few jumps. Too many people jump the crap out of the horse in the practice ring and then wonder why their horse rubs the jumps all the way around the ring.

                                  for a schooling day (non-showing), my focus will be on longer flatwork, lateral work, transitions, etc. and then probably a few (10 or less) jumps -- my horse rarely gets to jump in the ring she'll show in -- this is true for most AA rated shows.

                                  I want my horse to like her job, so I keep it as fun, relaxed and simple as possible. Sometimes, if you have a fresh one, you have to modify your routine, or else just plan to give them a lunge the next morning.

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                                  • #18
                                    I show him every fence in the warm up (the scheduled warm up in the actual ring) and then jump each to feel out how the lines ride and to allow him to feel each jump. Mine does not like surprises so we avoid them. I do not jump anything in the warm up ring while waiting for my go. I find them chaotic and mine is an older campaigner so no need.

                                    With the baby green I again show him each fence and trot/canter each one in the scheduled warm up, then trot one and canter one in the chaotic schooling ring before going in. This is more to get his mind focused but it is NOT a training session by any means.
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                                    • #19
                                      Originally posted by imapepper View Post
                                      I actually get anxious in the schooling ring. I prefer to do as little as possible and go I also try to find a quiet place to do most of my flatwork to warm up. My goal is to trot one and then canter about 3....then in I go Otherwise, both of us get fried in the warm up area. My mare and I both tend to be the nervous types
                                      I do the same. My mare is not a huge fan of other horses in general and especially in warm-up rings where people are coming from all different directions. I try to sneak a few jumps (maybe a few 2' verticals then a 3' oxer) in during a lull in the warm-up ring and then head into the show ring.

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                                      • #20
                                        Originally posted by imapepper View Post
                                        I actually get anxious in the schooling ring. I prefer to do as little as possible and go I also try to find a quiet place to do most of my flatwork to warm up. My goal is to trot one and then canter about 3....then in I go
                                        Me too.

                                        I was fortunate enough to finish my junior years (riding at 3' and a couple times at 3'6") with a horse that could literally walk off of the trailer on saturday, flat to work out the kinks, and trot an x on principal, and go in for a warm up round. We would MAYBE jump one 6" below height for a "hey--we're jumping" moment if he was feeling lazy or distracted (these are relative terms).

                                        He was a horse of a lifetime and I really worked to develop the ability to do this in order to save him (in addition to not jumping at home). Ended up spoiled, and scared of the kamikazes in the schooling ring.

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