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Horse Shopping Rant!

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  • #41
    I'm looking for something pretty specific and I'm getting a bit of a complex from some of the sellers I've enquired to I live in a more isolated area, so it's an investment in time and money to go look at everything that catches my eye...much easier if the seller will provide an honest response and some good pictures or video THEN I will come look.
    Some want show homes only. (Please state that in the ad then)
    Some just don't get back to you.(Please don't advertise if you don't really want to talk to anyone)
    Some can't be bothered to provide more info, even after I expain the situation. (You just missed a possible sale to a great home)
    Some make it appparent that their ad may not be a very accurate representation of the horse. (Be honest - you'll attract someone actually looking for what you have!)
    It's also amazing what you'll find if you do some internet searching of the horse or owners name. Prices vary way up or down, height and training especially seem to change frequently.
    I'm still looking and have a couple of potential 'go sees'. I thought selling was hard, buying might be even worse.

    Comment


    • #42
      Originally posted by terasa View Post
      I'm looking for something pretty specific and I'm getting a bit of a complex from some of the sellers I've enquired to ...
      It's also amazing what you'll find if you do some internet searching of the horse or owners name. Prices vary way up or down, height and training especially seem to change frequently.
      Yes! Google is your friend! I find it illuminating to discover what else the person is selling or find old ads for the same horse and comparing the descriptions.

      Comment

      • Original Poster

        #43
        Originally posted by Catomine View Post
        Nope. They were professionals. Horses ARE their jobs. 5-6 days to get a pic up when you KNOW they're at the barn all day every day? Please.

        I say get some pics up FIRST when you originally post the ad. If you really want to sell. Or I'm not going to waste MY time either.

        Good luck selling with that mentality.
        Agree.....I saw an ad for a well bred 3 yr old, priced correctly, I felt. Horse looked great in ad. I emailed and asked if there was video and was told the same....too busy, we intend to do a video soon. Well why not have a video before you put the horse up for sale? That way when the ad breaks you are ready.
        Now if someone is not a pro, has a video and I want some other shots and they say the need a few days....I wait. But a few days should not become 2 weeks.
        Then there is the horse I am really really interested in. The breeder tells me the horse is at a trainers and she will have the trainer video.... 1 month later I get a video of the horse on a lunge line, no under saddle, and I cannot tell how the horse trots because he is hardly moving. Both I and the breeder are annoyed because she told me the trainers do not want her to sell the horse and that is exactly how the video looks. She will be going, in 2 or 3 weeks, to video the horse herself. She is traveling to horse shows right now.
        I also have never had this problem buying before.
        Last edited by Parrotnutz; Mar. 21, 2010, 09:30 PM. Reason: spelling
        Adriane
        Happily retired but used to be:
        www.ParrotNutz.com

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        • #44
          I don't really get irritated when it comes to a non pro selling horses and not having super quick turn around but when pros selling expensive horses don't, I just don't understand. There is a girl at my barn looking in the 25-30k range and I found a nice horse in New York that she might like. I contacted the owner to ask if there were more pictures and video. He responds that he has no video and isn't planning on taking any right now but we were more than welcome to come see and try him. This person is a professional. Seriously? You are 8 hours away and you know that. Just crazy!

          Comment


          • #45
            horse shopping

            I'm hunting for a sport horse prospect myself. Here's some of what I've run into just recently...

            1) "Well, he was for sale, but since he didn't sell in 6 weeks the owner is now not sure she want's to sell him. I'll get back to you. " -- PITA

            2) "We don't care about registering horses. We go by their current performance." - Well, you sure are comfortable enough advertising the exploits of their registered kin. Awful nice of those other owners to do you the favor of registering their horses so the performance records of those horses could help you sell yours.

            3) I ask, "do you have his papers," response "yeah, they're in the house." Okay, well you knew I was coming today, why didn't you bring them to the barn? Better yet, why don't you walk 250 feet to the house, and bring them back with you...

            4) I ask, "How much do you want for him" - Response "he's in your price range." Therefore, I'll be offering a few K below my price range.

            5) I ask, "Where is the horse located" - Response "he's in such and such county." Sweetheart, I need to figure out how far away I am from your beast, give me the address of the damned horse.

            Don't get me started on "the picture doesn't do him justice," "the rider I have on him is just a working student, breaker, cowboy, etc.. he can really do much more," "he must be at least 16hh"

            All I can say is, people, it's no wonder those who can afford it go to Europe. Even large breeding farms of warmblood horses can't offer current video and pics of nice horses produced by skilled, qualified riders and trainers. Then, they complain American buyers won't pay $ for quality prospects. American buyers are smart enough to hop across the pond...
            "Friend" me !

            http://www.facebook.com/isabeau.solace

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            • #46
              Ask your vet and your farrier

              The best way to find this horse is possibly through your vet and farrier. They know everyone, can privately caution you on the characters you'll be dealing with, and generally don't have "a dog to hunt" in the outcome.

              Ask your favorite breeders if any of their clients have anything for sale, etc. For the best sellers, finding the right home is as important as the price, and they tend to under-advertise.

              Comment


              • #47
                I don't sell horses but I have a marketing/sales background, workwise.
                I agree that you need to have a library of good photos and videos of a sales horse. Keep taking them. I have some great clips of between 30-45 seconds of me riding, taken by my 8yo son on my digital camera. The nice thing about digital is that you can see the pic/vid right away and dump what isn't good.
                If you have horses advertised for sale, keep a small easy to use camera at the barn. Most of them shoot 10 minutes of video. If you are a pro, get extra shots/video when horse goes to school or in lessons. Build an online file of just his images. That way when you get an inquiry, you have recent footage.
                I don't expectyou to schlep to the barn at 10pm to answer my request, but assuming that you are at the barn daily, unless the weather is horrible etc, a day or two is not unreasonable. If you are a pro and are away at a show, I'm guessing you have someone back home that can help get a pic or two or maybe a quick video done.
                Also, if a horse is advertised as having a show record as long as my arm, don't give me a pic of him jumping an X made of garden tools between 2 resin lawn chairs and a rider in jeans and sneakers. Either buck it up and buy the video from the show or ask someone to please get some video at a show. Again, almost anyone over the age of 4 can take a reasonably good video.

                I cannot understand lying about basics like height. If I want a 16.2hh horse and show up and he's 15hh, you have wasted my time. You are also missing out on those that want a 15hh horse.
                F O.B
                Resident racing historian ~~~ Re-riders Clique
                Founder of the Mighty Thoroughbred Clique

                Comment


                • #48
                  Originally posted by Linny View Post
                  Again, almost anyone over the age of 4 can take a reasonably good video.
                  You would think.

                  Back when I lived an hour and a half drive away from my horses it was such fun to coax someone along to take a video and then the video was an effing DISASTER.

                  My mother (a former editor at Vogue, so you would think she would understand art direction and advertising) took sporadic six second "vignettes", interspersed with prolonged videography of the grass at her feet.
                  Remember, this is three hours round trip in the car and cleaning up the horse etc etc etc.

                  Simply handing over a camcorder to somebody who appears to be able to drive a car/operate a microwave/button their pants elicits an automatic, shrugging, aw-shucksian "Oh I'm terrible at videotaping but I'LL TRY!"
                  What do you mean, you'll try?! Aim. Follow. Zoom in. Zoom out. THE END.

                  The next time somebody tries that line with me I am just going to be like, "Dude, Linny's eight year old can do this..."
                  The Noodlehttp://tiny.cc/NGKmT&http://tiny.cc/gioSA
                  Jinxyhttp://tiny.cc/PIC798&http://tiny.cc/jinx364
                  Boy Wonderhttp://tiny.cc/G9290
                  The Hana is nuts! NUTS!!http://tinyurl.com/SOCRAZY

                  Comment


                  • #49
                    I knew there would be a plus for living in Germany......400 miles to see one horses? Would never happen!

                    If you want or need to sell you have to make it happen!
                    I can not understand why you present a sell horse like it just came out of a snow storm?
                    I understand that it can be hard to proper present a unridden youngster that was out in the field and isn't used to be groomed. But still if it's not my bbf trying the horse they have to look nice!

                    I can not stand if you come to a barn and everything looks like a tornado was just there! Hello even WalMart cleans up!

                    It's like some people say how you dress for a lesson/clinic/show it represents your respect!

                    Comment


                    • #50
                      Originally posted by Isabeau Z Solace View Post
                      3) I ask, "do you have his papers," response "yeah, they're in the house." Okay, well you knew I was coming today, why didn't you bring them to the barn? Better yet, why don't you walk 250 feet to the house, and bring them back with you...
                      I have learned, the hard way, to negotiate thusly:

                      "I would like to buy the horse. I will bring a check with me when I come with the trailer. I would like to agree, from the outset, that if his papers are not WITH HIM when I arrive with the trailer, I will write a check for HALF, take the horse, and send the rest when I get the papers. Please sign here to indicate your agreement."

                      Because that's TWICE now that people have said, "Oh, I'll get those papers to you for sure."
                      I am sure they had them, but once they have cash in hand they lose all motivation.
                      The Noodlehttp://tiny.cc/NGKmT&http://tiny.cc/gioSA
                      Jinxyhttp://tiny.cc/PIC798&http://tiny.cc/jinx364
                      Boy Wonderhttp://tiny.cc/G9290
                      The Hana is nuts! NUTS!!http://tinyurl.com/SOCRAZY

                      Comment


                      • #51
                        Originally posted by meupatdoes View Post
                        My mother (a former editor at Vogue, so you would think she would understand art direction and advertising) took sporadic six second "vignettes", interspersed with prolonged videography of the grass at her feet.
                        ROFLMAO

                        Been awhile since the coffee has hit the screen like that...and I got tears on my glasses. Off for a towel here.
                        When opportunity knocks it's wearing overalls and looks like work.

                        The horse world. Two people. Three opinions.

                        Comment


                        • #52
                          Originally posted by meupatdoes View Post
                          I have learned, the hard way, to negotiate thusly:

                          "I would like to buy the horse. I will bring a check with me when I come with the trailer. I would like to agree, from the outset, that if his papers are not WITH HIM when I arrive with the trailer, I will write a check for HALF, take the horse, and send the rest when I get the papers. Please sign here to indicate your agreement."

                          Because that's TWICE now that people have said, "Oh, I'll get those papers to you for sure."
                          I am sure they had them, but once they have cash in hand they lose all motivation.
                          Will keep this negotiation tactic in the back of my mind for future use if we run in to a similar situation.
                          Ryu Equestrian & Facebook Page
                          Breeding Horses Today, for the Equestrian Sport of Tomorrow.
                          Osteen & Gainesville, Florida.

                          Comment

                          • Original Poster

                            #53
                            Originally posted by HiddenAcres View Post
                            The best way to find this horse is possibly through your vet and farrier. They know everyone, can privately caution you on the characters you'll be dealing with, and generally don't have "a dog to hunt" in the outcome.

                            Ask your favorite breeders if any of their clients have anything for sale, etc. For the best sellers, finding the right home is as important as the price, and they tend to under-advertise.
                            Yes that can be true, but living in NJ the horses prices seem to reflect the realestate they graze on plus Appendix Quarter horses for hunters are not popular here so I usually have to travel to find one. My friend knows this too and is willing to.
                            Adriane
                            Happily retired but used to be:
                            www.ParrotNutz.com

                            Comment


                            • #54
                              When I had my horse for sale I took my trainers advice, and before posting him I had the following already loaded on the comp and ready to send out
                              Pics:
                              -a set of front back and both side confo shots
                              -Nice trot picture(on the lunge over poles)
                              -Nice under saddle picture
                              -Cutesy head/around the barn shots

                              Video:
                              -Lunging, showing transitions, W/T/C, and both directions
                              -Lunging, over poles and x-rails
                              -Under saddle, W/T and transitions, both directions
                              -Under saddle, poles and small x-rail
                              -In Hand, trotting straight towards and away from the camera with tight
                              turns at the end

                              He was a low priced greenie, but having all that already on the comp made it easy to send out pretty much anything people were looking for, since I was working 2 jobs and getting new under saddle pics and video was a real hassle. If you can't decide from all that if he's worth the drive I doubt you'll turn out to be more than a tire kicker anyway, so you might have to wait a week until I can get it.
                              You can't fix stupid.... but you can breed it!

                              Comment


                              • #55
                                I have a lovely registered fairly fancy AQHA Appendix pre-green mare for sale. I advertised her on several web-sites with two great pics and three direct video links. When people e-mail me about her, I respond within a few hours. If they call and I cannot answer, I return their message immediately. I am honest about her size (15.3) and personality. Not one person has come to look at her.

                                Some people say I am being to honest but I do not want to waste any ones time and with what she is priced at she obviously has some kind of issue. Hers is "I always know the right way to do things so you don't really need to teach me or explain it" syndrome. You don't get a fancy dead quiet horse for her price but for an experienced adult with a small budget they could get something really nice.

                                If you call me about a horse for your seven year old, I am going to tell you she is not appropriate. If you call me and ask me how she would do as a cutting horse, I am going to figure if you are that stupid to be calling on her then you are not experienced enough to be riding her. If you have your ten year old e-mail me and every other word is spelled wrong or in text speak, I am going to ask her to have her trainer call me. If you call and ask for some video of her jumping a little higher or riding a dressage test, I will be happy to take it for you with my FLIP and get it to you within a few days.

                                I am selling her because she did not get large enough for me but I some times consider keeping her just because I dread the horse buying process as well. It is hard being the buyer OR the seller with all the kooks out there and every one thinking with the economy right now they should get something for nothing. Just my two cents and little vent.

                                Comment


                                • #56
                                  Originally posted by Horsegal984 View Post
                                  When I had my horse for sale I took my trainers advice, and before posting him I had the following already loaded on the comp and ready to send out
                                  Pics:
                                  -a set of front back and both side confo shots
                                  -Nice trot picture(on the lunge over poles)
                                  -Nice under saddle picture
                                  -Cutesy head/around the barn shots

                                  Video:
                                  -Lunging, showing transitions, W/T/C, and both directions
                                  -Lunging, over poles and x-rails
                                  -Under saddle, W/T and transitions, both directions
                                  -Under saddle, poles and small x-rail
                                  -In Hand, trotting straight towards and away from the camera with tight
                                  turns at the end
                                  This is similar to what I did the last time I sold a five-figure horse, which sadly was before Internet video was the norm (oy, mailing VHS, anyone remember that??).

                                  I stood the mare on gravel, videoed just the legs as I circled at knee height, stooping for closeups front and back. Videoed both sides and front and back as she stood. Had a lesson student who was a GOOD kid walk and trot her away and back on the gravel. Had kid ride her in the arena, some flatting but mostly jumping at kid's level (crossrails to 2-foot, bending lines to show auto-leads, etc). Video also showed mounting, kid tightening her own girth from up top, that sort of stuff. Sent along stills of me riding mare at shows, etc, at 3' and 3'3''. Sold the mare in no time flat to very happy owners who send me video and pics a few times a year, mostly showing ribbons and platters and stuff.

                                  I did advertise online, showed stills of lesson students at shows and one pic of me. Added that video was available. Made copies and mailed when requested, nothing to it.
                                  COTH's official mini-donk enabler

                                  "I am all for reaching out, but in some situations it needs to be done with a rolled up news paper." Alagirl

                                  Comment


                                  • #57
                                    I'll add - if the horse has a show record, please be specific when you state it! Especially if it is a good one!
                                    Man plans. God laughs.

                                    Comment


                                    • #58
                                      Originally posted by LowerSaxony_Jumper View Post
                                      I knew there would be a plus for living in Germany......400 miles to see one horses? Would never happen!

                                      If you want or need to sell you have to make it happen!
                                      I can not understand why you present a sell horse like it just came out of a snow storm?
                                      I understand that it can be hard to proper present a unridden youngster that was out in the field and isn't used to be groomed. But still if it's not my bbf trying the horse they have to look nice!

                                      I can not stand if you come to a barn and everything looks like a tornado was just there! Hello even WalMart cleans up!

                                      It's like some people say how you dress for a lesson/clinic/show it represents your respect!
                                      400 miles won't happen again unless there were several prospects at a KNOWN barn.

                                      I thought it was very rude of them not to at least GROOM him before my arrival, considering I did drive all that way to see him. (AND he was inches below the height they said he was, you'd think they'd at least try to get everything going in their favor..) I don't think they even had the horsemanship etiquette to even know that wasn't appropriate. (Even though the chick bragged to me about her
                                      'fabulous' AA show record).

                                      I may not be an AA level rider, but I do have AA level horsemanship skills Groom the poor animal at least!
                                      But George Morris still wears rust-colored breeches- so can I!

                                      Comment


                                      • #59
                                        Unfortunately there are individuals out there who do not want to attract any experienced, knowledgeable, buyers.

                                        Poor quality photos and videos don't reveal detailed information. Perhaps the seller knows this.

                                        You may come across to a seller as a buyer who knows horses, and perhaps the seller knows it will be hard to sell the horse to such a person, and then becomes a PITA to discourage further interest.

                                        Other sellers simply do not have experience selling horses.

                                        What I find most often are sellers who lack the ability to understand that all riders do not all ride exactly the same way, and the best thing that they can do to increase their chances of selling their horse, is to have some different riders try their horse before putting it on the market. This can be a very relieving test that may expose areas of weakness in the horses training, and help make the seller more aware of who may be a more appropriate buyer of their horse.

                                        From my horse buying experience I would say that only about one out of any ten of the horses I go look at, are what I've expected to see.

                                        Comment


                                        • #60
                                          Originally posted by Percheron X View Post
                                          Unfortunately there are individuals out there who do not want to attract any experienced, knowledgeable, buyers.

                                          Poor quality photos and videos don't reveal detailed information. Perhaps the seller knows this.

                                          You may come across to a seller as a buyer who knows horses, and perhaps the seller knows it will be hard to sell the horse to such a person, and then becomes a PITA to discourage further interest.

                                          Other sellers simply do not have experience selling horses.

                                          What I find most often are sellers who lack the ability to understand that all riders do not all ride exactly the same way, and the best thing that they can do to increase their chances of selling their horse, is to have some different riders try their horse before putting it on the market. This can be a very relieving test that may expose areas of weakness in the horses training, and help make the seller more aware of who may be a more appropriate buyer of their horse.

                                          From my horse buying experience I would say that only about one out of any ten of the horses I go look at, are what I've expected to see.
                                          As a person who markets quite a lot of horses, I agree a lot with what you are saying here. THe horses that I market all get a variety of riders here, they are NOT used in "lesson programs". When they are sent to me they are schooled by myself, two other adult riders and a couple of junior riders. I will evaluate them that way and usually one of those people show the horse to a prospective buyer, if selling for a child, try to have a child rider, ammie, try to have an ammie rider etc. Very few buyers are able to accurately represent how they ride, thru no fault of their own. I think that some, who are first time buyers, think that as they can ride a steady school horse, they are ready for more horse, which often is not the case. THis is one reason I really like to speak with their trainer first to accurately get a picture of what type of horse they need. I try to "screen" buyers first so theya ren't wasting their time and mine looking at an unsuitable horse. I also try very hard to give an accurate representation of what they will see, and generally buyers tell me that they saw what they were told they would see.
                                          www.shawneeacres.net

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