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Trakehners- what do you think?

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  • Trakehners- what do you think?

    I have been leasing a Trakehner gelding for about 5 months now. I absolutely adore him and to me, he represents a wonderful breed exceptional for hunters, eq, and dressage. In the past however, I was aware of the breed's ill-repute, and I'm wondering where this stems from and if this is the consideration in the modern horse world today? I have even heard mentioned that they are not considered 'real' warmbloods (of course this is extreme bias from one individual's opinion), and to be sub-par to other prominent breeds like Oldenburgs and DWB, Hanoverian, etc.. To my knowledge the Trakehner breed is the oldest WB to date.
    Anyways, I'm just interested in different people's views on the breed. Either way I still think my gelding is amazing, (and he is, used to get offers in medals classes of over 80k) regardless of the breed's reputation, I was just interested in some more insight in general. Thanks all!
    But George Morris still wears rust-colored breeches- so can I!

  • #2
    I love my Trak. They are just not easy horses. They have personality and don't take any crap. Treat them wioth respect and they will try their heart out for you. Treat them like a machine and they will tell you to stuff it
    Every time you ride, your are either teaching or un-teaching your horse.

    Comment


    • #3
      The Trakehners I have been around have all been easy and kind, so I haven't ever had a negative experience with their temperament, and I rarely hear people say that they have. However, it's a very rare Trakehner that has the jumping style for the hunter ring. They tend to be good movers and lovely to look at, but people avoid them because it's so rare to find one that uses its shoulder well enough over the jumps. Hollywood, though, was an example of a good-jumping Trakehner, and I know there have been others. Just harder to find and riskier to take a chance on.

      Comment

      • Original Poster

        #4
        Wow, interesting! I guess I have a rare one because his jumping style is super scopey, round, and with great use of his shoulder and nice square knees. His only fault is his sometimes laziness as he gets bored easily and that you cannot touch his mouth to the fence as without enough leg, he is liable to be buried very easily and put in an awkward chip as his jump is super round. Thanks for the input!
        But George Morris still wears rust-colored breeches- so can I!

        Comment


        • #5
          I got a mare a few years ago that I was told was Hanoverian/Trak but come to find out she is full Trakehner. I too had always heard negative things about Trakehners and wouldn't have touched one with a 10 foot pole. I have to say this mare has changed my mind...at least about generalizing ALL Trakehners. She is very easy going and although I use her primarily as a broodmare (she is a FANTASTIC producer) I have taken her to a couple local hunter shows (she competed in dressage before I got her). She is WONDERFUL...quiet, willing and a beautiful mover. She could use more scope and technique over fences but we only jumped 2'3" and she's 16.3. She may be one of those horses that doesn't try until the fences get some height. Her sire scored quite well in the jumping portion of his 100 dat test (9's). She was also only going undersaddle after 2 years off for about a month and weaned about 2 weeks so she was still quite out of shape. Plus she'd never seen a hunter course in her life- I only did a few lines at home before the shows. I would take another dozen like her- she's worth a million bucks.
          That being said, I leased a Trakehner mare that was, in my mind, more true to what I'd heard about the breed. She was very flighty and untrusting. I don't know much about her undersaddle as she was only here to use as an ET recipient mare so perhaps she was a dream to ride...but we just did not get along.
          I think Trakehners are like any breed, you get some great ones, some good ones and some not so good ones...you just need to pick the right personality to suit you.
          www.NorthHillFarmNY.com
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          • #6
            Traks also have a much more closed stud book, and have in the past added more TB and arab blood, so some of them can have a little more blood than your average warmblood.
            -Grace

            Comment


            • #7
              The wonderful jumper Abdullah was a Trakehner, IIRC. Certainly plenty of scope and quality there

              However, I've known a few and although they were athletic, they were fairly difficult temperments.

              I look at each horse as an individual, certainly, and I am sure there are quite a few very nice Traks out there, but it wouldn't be a breed that I'd particularly go looking for if I were in the market for another horse.
              **********
              We move pretty fast for some rabid garden snails.
              -PaulaEdwina

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              • #8
                Trakehners are actually more of a true "breed" than other WB's which are not "breeds" but "types". The trakehner and the Holsteiners are true closed studbooks, with some rare exceptions of TB or arab blood allowed in. But go look at the oldenburg books, the RPSHI books and even the Hanoverian books and you will see a variety of horses from other registrys that are in there, making it a "type" registry and not a breed registry. GRanted the ones that are in those studbooks are of known, specific bloodlines, but no truly a breed
                www.shawneeacres.net

                Comment


                • #9
                  To quote:

                  "We accept that the Trakehner is not the horse for everyone. However, those of us prejudiced in favor of this noble breed equate the intelligence and sensitivity to the difference between making an omlette and a souffle. Both are wonderful egg-based dishes, but the lightness and air of a perfect souffle requires patience and skill found only in the most accomplished chefs. A heavy hand ruins a souffle, but a light, deft touch - and perhaps a bit of poetry of soul - produces a little bit of heaven here on earth . . . the same can be said of our Trakehner."

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Trakehners and TB's are both my favourite horses...no suprise I have a barn full of TB/Trak crosses I have one in my barn (gelding) that is opinionated and thinks the world revolves around him. He can be naughty under saddle in that he only does what he thinks he should....but never dangerous and never mean spirited....you just have to be diplomatically firm in your wishes and then he co-operates. And yet another Trak/TB mare (half sister to the above gelding) in my barn is the kindest, sweetest and most forgiving horse you could ever ask for. She would be a perfect childs mount except she is busy doing the A hunter thing at the moment.

                    Its funny though...I have heard over and over that Trakehners do not have the "style" of jump to be successful in the hunter ring. I am still trying to figure that one out. My mare seems to do quite well. Just to follow up though....can anyone explain to me why amongst some of the hunter crowd the Trak is not considered a "good" A circuit hunter. Or even better perhaps show me some photos of Trak exhibiting this "bad" jumping form. I have yet to see it myself.

                    Comment

                    • Original Poster

                      #11
                      Originally posted by TheOrangeOne View Post
                      Traks also have a much more closed stud book, and have in the past added more TB and arab blood, so some of them can have a little more blood than your average warmblood.
                      When you say 'blood', do you mean hotter blood? Like a hotter temperament because of the TB and arab influence? I can definitely see that in the breed, even in my horse. He does have a bit of a spook in him, I figured as much with the arab/tb influence in the breed that this is common.
                      But George Morris still wears rust-colored breeches- so can I!

                      Comment

                      • Original Poster

                        #12
                        Originally posted by Alternater View Post
                        To quote:

                        "We accept that the Trakehner is not the horse for everyone. However, those of us prejudiced in favor of this noble breed equate the intelligence and sensitivity to the difference between making an omlette and a souffle. Both are wonderful egg-based dishes, but the lightness and air of a perfect souffle requires patience and skill found only in the most accomplished chefs. A heavy hand ruins a souffle, but a light, deft touch - and perhaps a bit of poetry of soul - produces a little bit of heaven here on earth . . . the same can be said of our Trakehner."
                        I LOVE this..
                        But George Morris still wears rust-colored breeches- so can I!

                        Comment

                        • Original Poster

                          #13
                          Originally posted by shawneeAcres View Post
                          Trakehners are actually more of a true "breed" than other WB's which are not "breeds" but "types". The trakehner and the Holsteiners are true closed studbooks, with some rare exceptions of TB or arab blood allowed in. But go look at the oldenburg books, the RPSHI books and even the Hanoverian books and you will see a variety of horses from other registrys that are in there, making it a "type" registry and not a breed registry. GRanted the ones that are in those studbooks are of known, specific bloodlines, but no truly a breed
                          Everything makes a LOT more sense to me now, I see TB's registered as Oldenbergs and a lot of variance in the body types I see in registered WB 'types'.
                          But George Morris still wears rust-colored breeches- so can I!

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Where does the quote come from, Alternater?
                            Blog: The Continuing Adventures of an (ahem) Mature Re-Rider without a Trust Fund...but, finally, A Farm of Her Own!!

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              SO do I cat and I love the breed. Here is another quote for all the Trak lovers out there:

                              "One criterium more important for the Trakehner than for any other breed is type. Type does not only mean the expression of the face, but is expanded to include a harmonious body with long lines and a large frame hinting towards the thoroughbred influence in this breed. Since the Trakehner not only is a formidable riding horse, but also has a duty refining other warmblood breeds, this is a very important factor. However, the breed did suffer a lot from the times of breeding beauty over performance.

                              Because of its very unique history, the Trakehner was developed as, and continues to be, the ideal sporthorse. The combination of Arabian blood for intelligence and stamina and English Thoroughbred for toughness, size and courage has -over the centuries- developed a modern riding horse that is one of the most intelligent and sensitive in the world. This noted sensitivity is perhaps a reason why many hold a prejudice against the Trakehner."

                              Comment

                              • Original Poster

                                #16
                                Originally posted by Alternater View Post
                                SO do I cat and I love the breed. Here is another quote for all the Trak lovers out there:

                                "One criterium more important for the Trakehner than for any other breed is type. Type does not only mean the expression of the face, but is expanded to include a harmonious body with long lines and a large frame hinting towards the thoroughbred influence in this breed. Since the Trakehner not only is a formidable riding horse, but also has a duty refining other warmblood breeds, this is a very important factor. However, the breed did suffer a lot from the times of breeding beauty over performance.

                                Because of its very unique history, the Trakehner was developed as, and continues to be, the ideal sporthorse. The combination of Arabian blood for intelligence and stamina and English Thoroughbred for toughness, size and courage has -over the centuries- developed a modern riding horse that is one of the most intelligent and sensitive in the world. This noted sensitivity is perhaps a reason why many hold a prejudice against the Trakehner."
                                Both of the quotes make a lot of sense. Sterl (my Trak), would definitely never do anything to make one think 'Dumblood!'
                                But George Morris still wears rust-colored breeches- so can I!

                                Comment


                                • #17
                                  Mortebella- this information comes from Trakehner International. Here's the website:
                                  http://www.trakehners-international.com/ideal.html

                                  Comment


                                  • #18
                                    Originally posted by cherham View Post
                                    Its funny though...I have heard over and over that Trakehners do not have the "style" of jump to be successful in the hunter ring. I am still trying to figure that one out. My mare seems to do quite well. Just to follow up though....can anyone explain to me why amongst some of the hunter crowd the Trak is not considered a "good" A circuit hunter. Or even better perhaps show me some photos of Trak exhibiting this "bad" jumping form. I have yet to see it myself.
                                    I think the easiest way to too see this, without making anyone a "bad" example, is to go to a sales site, like warmbloods-for-sale for instance, and limit your search to Trakehners. You can see repeated in the jumping photos the style flaws that tend to be common in the Trakehner: a stiff neck and a low shoulder and forearm.

                                    This is NOT to say that there aren't many horses in other breeds who are not good jumpers, nor that all Trakehners are bad jumpers. What is interesting though is that the Trakehner as a breed is really consistent in what the flaw is when there is one, and it's one that is the hardest to correct in a horse. The consistency and the difficulty of fixing it make it very memorable to people, which is what produces the bad reputation. And, there is also the fact that many people have been drawn in by the common GOOD traits, as I mentioned, the movement and the looks, and have gotten burned badly on a Trakehner. No one forgets that quickly either .

                                    Comment


                                    • #19
                                      Out of sheer boredom, I did a search on warmbloods for sale, and found a serious number of horses that jump in the exact manner described by CBoylen.

                                      I guess it's possible that the trend of widespread, specific faults for purpose-intended Traks (only referring to the type of jump desirable in the hunter ring- not making any type of judgment regarding the jumper or dressage arenas) could be directly related to the closed book in the breed. It can be hard to really alter the style of a large pool of animals without introducing influential contributors with desirable styles into a closed stud book.
                                      Here today, gone tomorrow...

                                      Comment


                                      • #20
                                        I went to WB's for sale and looked at a few, and tend to agree. One or two of the younger ones looked like they might make nice hunters but most didn't., at least not at the higher levels.
                                        It looks as the the breed carries more Arab than any other WB. The flat jump with less neck seems to be a trait the Arabians often carry.
                                        As mentioned though, popularity is often different at different levels. If you plan on showing at the elite shows (Wellington/Upperville/Devon etc) you must have a stricter standard. Several of the horses I saw on the WB's site looked like they would (if those jumps were representative) be very nice for a more moderate level of showing, like local A's and the like.
                                        F O.B
                                        Resident racing historian ~~~ Re-riders Clique
                                        Founder of the Mighty Thoroughbred Clique

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