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What is an "Appointments class?"

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  • What is an "Appointments class?"

    I saw in the Crystal bling in the hunter ring that a few posters were talking about an appointments class. If I understand correctly, the appointments are what you wear (breeches, boots, tack, helmet, etc.) so what exactly is (or was.....i don't think they have them anymore) an appointments class???
  • Original Poster

    #2
    I saw in the Crystal bling in the hunter ring that a few posters were talking about an appointments class. If I understand correctly, the appointments are what you wear (breeches, boots, tack, helmet, etc.) so what exactly is (or was.....i don't think they have them anymore) an appointments class???

    Comment


    • #3
      I don't think shows have appointments classes anymore, at least I haven't heard of any. Its a hunter class (used to be on the outside course) that had very specific rules for the horse's tack and the rider's clothes, just as you said. Bridles had to be "sewn in", string gloves worn under the girth, sandwich cases and flasks, rider had to carry a hunt whip, boots had garters that had to be worn between the 2nd & 3rd buttons of your breeches, stock ties (NOT ready tied) had to be worn. Only canary or buff breeches were allowed unless you were a staff member, its been so long I can't remember all the requirements. It was a lot of work to get ready for the class but I loved watching them.

      Comment


      • #4
        BAC -- Why did they wear the string gloves under the girth? Was that just how they "presented" and then they removed them to wear while riding?
        ***Honorary Member of the "What is BOSS?" Cult...er...CLIQUE***
        ***Prominent Member of the 'Irrelevent Posters Clique'***
        CrayolaPosse ~ Bluegreen

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        • #5
          No. You wore leather gloves to ride, and had string gloves under the girth in the event of rain.

          Don't forget the plain turkey sandwich in the sandwich case and flask of tea or sherry!

          Comment


          • #6
            I think although I may be wrong that the string gloves were in case of rain in the hunt field, the rider had to wear leather gloves during the class. And they had to be positioned just exactly right under the girth, with the fingers pointing towards the shoulder.

            Comment


            • #7
              I'm a bit too young for this class, so please explain: what was the point? Was it to give a feel for what would be worn in a real hunt? Was the class ridden any differently than a normal hunter class? What was the purpose of the super strict dress code?

              Comment


              • #8
                There are still appointments classes in the Sidesaddle division. And don't some shows still run a Corinthian class?

                And yes - the string gloves are carried in case of rain. Although I've never seen anyone pull them out and use them when it rained during a class. Can't imagine you'd be marked down for it. Also - the leather gloves must be brown - never black.
                http://www.tbhsa.com/index.html

                Originally Posted by JSwan
                I love feral children. They taste like chicken.

                Comment


                • #9
                  <BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by apachepony:
                  I'm a bit too young for this class, so please explain: what was the point? Was it to give a feel for what would be worn in a real hunt? Was the class ridden any differently than a normal hunter class? What was the purpose of the super strict dress code? </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

                  It was primarily for real foxhunters, and they were popular back in the days of big outside courses.

                  There is a strict dress code for hunting (at least on the High Holy Days) and you'd adhere to that code for an appointments class.
                  http://www.tbhsa.com/index.html

                  Originally Posted by JSwan
                  I love feral children. They taste like chicken.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    In Appointments and Corinthian classes judges were supposed to be looking for "brilliance" in addition to all the usual qualities in a hunter class.

                    I never questioned what the "point" of it was and where I grew up, an appointments class was just added to the division at some shows, not all of them, for example, the junior hunter division might have one, as would the regular working and the amateur owner divisions. Many of the people showing in those days also hunted but they were not necessarily showing on their field hunters, although some did. Most of the shows during this time (1960s) had outside courses for the hunter classes. Maybe it was meant as a means of preserving hunting tradition.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      AHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHH that was a wonderful magical time!!

                      "Appointments" that were required for those classes had to directly do with what happens in the hunt field..and there were alot of requirements.

                      EXAMPLES ONLY..please everyone fill in more that you know, it's been so long ago I probably forget a few.

                      +++++Bridle with bits sewn in...you never wanted a buckle to break if you were out in the field.
                      ++++String gloves...when the rain hits leather gloves get slippery so an additional "emergency" pair of string gloves was put under each side of the saddle flap in a position so that you could slip you hands in easily without losing control of your horse.
                      ++++Sandwich case...attached to those little rings on the right side of your saddle in the back. Sandwich had to be with butter, no mayo, with the crust cut off and wrapped in wax paper.
                      ++++Flask...should have brandy, tes or sherry in it!
                      ++++Stock tie...tied so it was easy to get off in a hurry in case you or your horse got cut it became a bandage or tourniquit.
                      ++++Stock pin...so you could pin the bandage.
                      ++++Folded girth..not elastic ends.
                      ++++A set number of braids so that the brambles stayed out of your horses mane.

                      And so on.

                      I had a trunk that traveled to the shows and all it had was the Appointments. It was a prize possession.

                      Probably the biggest saddness not seeing these classes anymore is the tremendous pride all of us took in making sure all the stuff was exactly right.

                      And the VERY BEST part was if a judge actually opened your sandwich case or flask to check on the accuracy.

                      And the SADDEST part was if you forgot something.

                      Come on your guys, add to the list. I am late for the barn so go for it. This could be fun.

                      Also, any storys?????

                      I have one: At the Flower show in Santa Barbara one year there was an Open Conformation Hunter Divsion with Appointments classes. Champ Hough was the judge.

                      Gary Ryman, Lu Thomas, Kenny Nordstrom and a few other got a big ole mule and bathed it till its skin was pink, paid for the braider, polished it's feet, put all the gear on it.

                      When the call back came someone trotted it in in the middle of the line and when Champ got down the line to that "horse" and saw it we all went hysterical. The look on his face was priceless!!!

                      In case you don't know Champ...he was a superlative horseman who specialized in amazingly beautiful horses and took exceptional pride in their turnout and Appointments. He was a fanatic as a judge and one of those "serious" types...BUT had a great sense of humor and when the shock of seeing the "next horse in line" was a mule all dolled up...

                      He laughed as hard as we did.

                      PS..he placed the mule "First" with "special" prizes and then went on pinning the class..turned the table a bit.
                      [url]http://www.horseshowbiz.com
                      [url]http://www.ijumpsports.com

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        BAC - that's very true, that the horses weren't necessarily field hunters.

                        But I also think "back in the day", horses had more than one job, more than they do now. So it was more likely to see a horse in the show ring, then out hunting during the off season.

                        Now horses don't even GET an off season.

                        (But that's a very different topic!)
                        http://www.tbhsa.com/index.html

                        Originally Posted by JSwan
                        I love feral children. They taste like chicken.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Weren't the Corinthian classes restricted to people who were members of a recognized hunt??

                          Great story Kathy!!!
                          "The standard you walk by is the standard you accept."--Lt. Gen. David Morrison, Austalian Army Chief

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            I forgot, NO SADDLEPADS. Actually back in those days we didn't use saddlepads in any division at horse shows.

                            And khobstetter, I forgot about the folded leather girth, we didn't even have elastic end girths when I started riding as a child. (we didn't have stretch breeches either, they were gabardine and had BIG flares ).

                            And you're right, MyGiantPony, most horses back then had several jobs, even the show horses.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              khobstetter -

                              A friend of mine had been out hunting and kept hershey bars and diet coke in her sandwich case/flask. She went to a show on the spur of the moment, forgot to check her sandwich case, got used in the line up, and of course the judge was checking cases.

                              She got a very stern "you know what's supposed to be in here" - and did get put down the line.

                              As for appointments....

                              Dress boots - never field boots. With tabs.
                              Heavy spurs set high.
                              Sewn in bridles - either pelhams or double bridles.
                              Bridle and breastplate both of plain flat leather.
                              Sandwich - turkey or watercress, no dressing, no crust.
                              Sherry or tea in the flask.
                              Brown gloves
                              No jewelry except a wedding band.
                              You covered the girth
                              No saddlepads allowed.
                              Traditional hunt whip with thong.

                              Frock coat, 3 buttons.
                              Breeches - canary or buff
                              Vest - canary or tattersall
                              hunt cap - ribbons up or bowler

                              Then there are different/additional rules of attire for staff members and sidesaddle.
                              http://www.tbhsa.com/index.html

                              Originally Posted by JSwan
                              I love feral children. They taste like chicken.

                              Comment


                              • #16
                                <BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by khobstetter:
                                AHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHH that was a wonderful magical time!!

                                Probably the biggest saddness not seeing these classes anymore is the tremendous pride all of us took in making sure all the stuff was exactly right.
                                </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

                                Thats so true, I used to groom for my boyfriend as a junior and this was my responsibility. I miss those classes.

                                Occasionally a judge would take bite from the sandwich or a drink from the flask.

                                I recently bought my first saddle in 30 years and while saddle searching I realized, where are the D rings for the sandwich case and flask? Guess that shows how few appointments classes there are nowadays.

                                Comment


                                • #17
                                  Wow, you really had to have a certain kind of sandwich!? I thought someone was kidding about that earlier.

                                  Now i'm showing my age...you covered the girth with what?

                                  What was the point in having dress boots instead of field boots? Tradition or did it actually have a purpose (I know most hunting traditions had a purpose).

                                  Someone earlier mentioned a set number of braids to keep brambles out. How in the world did a certain number of braids do that?

                                  You sure do learn something new every day...

                                  Comment


                                  • #18
                                    Dress boots are considered formal; field boots are considered informal (and, for hunting purposes, are ALWAYS brown!!).

                                    Braiding in general stems from the need to keep the mane from getting tangled up. Number of braids told you the sex of the horse (like you couldn't tell anyway, LOL, but...). I think it was an even number for a gelding and an odd number for a mare, wasn't it? Or vice versa...
                                    "The standard you walk by is the standard you accept."--Lt. Gen. David Morrison, Austalian Army Chief

                                    Comment


                                    • #19
                                      Breeches had buttons on the knee, and I believe it was only three could be showing above the boot.
                                      Save the Nauga\'s

                                      Comment


                                      • #20
                                        Knobsetter: LUVED the story.

                                        I have a fairly recently one from Warrenton

                                        A few years back I was showing a sidesaddle horse owned by someone who had extras,however, from time to time they forgot their "appointments"... and I typically brought extras.

                                        However, when it came to the required sandwich -- ok pay attention everyone -- it is supposed to be sliced chicken or sliced white turkey on white bread with the crusts cut off, no condiments and wrapped in wax paper.

                                        Anyway, the generous horse owner forgot the sandwich and took 1/2 of mine. Realize I had already cut it down to fit my small silver box for my small sandwich case ... so it ended up being 1/2 of a tiny sandwich.

                                        Sue Bobb escorted the judge down the line to check appointments. When they go to me, they pull out the silver box and the judge said, "Oh my, this is such a SMALL sandwich!"

                                        And Sue, being quick on her feet replied, "Well Lisa is a SMALL eater!" I luckily got away with it that day.

                                        We all have the green sandwich stories... forgetting to empty your case after the class and then finding a science experiment going on in your sandwich case when you drag it out at the beginning of the next season.

                                        Thank for bringing this up because my sandwich case was sent out to be re-silvered FOUR MONTHS AGO and I still don't have it back. Now I need it in three weeks... YIKES.



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