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    Last edited by Touch~of~Gold; Jan. 8, 2011, 07:28 PM.

  • #2
    Horses and ponies are NOT investments or ways to make money! The only people who may make money are those who own their own farm! Lets say you bought a 10k pony and kept it for a year, showing it 2x per month at the A shows (about 1500 per show) by the end of the year you will have about $60,000 into that 10k pony! And if you include Florida you are easily looking at another 20k added to what you have in the pony. You would have to sell it for $75,000 and in this economy that is not going to happen easily. Take the money you would put into a pony and go to graduate school!

    Comment


    • #3
      Sorry, I dont really have much advice. I just wanted to say that this is something I have always wanted to do as well (except on a lower scale). Good luck! I hope it works out!
      "To do something that you feel in your heart that's great, you need to make a lot of mistakes. Anything that is successful is a series of mistakes." -B.J. Armstrong

      Comment


      • #4
        If you are specifically doing this to make money for a horse?

        Don't do it.

        Green Ponies are cheap right now but having to pay the freight on one at, say, 1200 a month (board, vet, farrier but not including shows)? That takes your 10k Green Pony to a still Green 17k+ Pony in 6 months. Take it to WEF under a trainers guidance and pay the expenses/travel/entry fees/stall etc. for the Pony and rider? No way you'll get out for under 5k a month on that, stay for 8 weeks and you'll have a 27k+ still Green Pony.

        You want to get that 27k overhead out and make some more for a good show horse prospect? Talking about 50k or so and up as a sale price. More every week you keep it.

        The market is for packers with proven show records. Can you be sure that your Pony will quickly learn to pack that small child rider? Do you have the contacts for a really good Pony jock with a good reputation to be your regular rider? Have you or your trainer been selling horses or Ponies in that price range and do you know or have contacts that will spend that?

        What if it does not do well in the shows? Needs a better rider then the average buyer child? And it comes back from Florida continuing to rack up 1200 a month?

        If you need that sale money to get a horse? Put the 10k purchase price plus 1200 a month in the bank for a year and go find a nice Green horse for yourself.

        The Ponies that sell high are pretty made and presented by trainers who specialize in them ridden by real Pony jocks that ride almost exclusively for them and they are big winners...and they STILL are hard to sell.
        When opportunity knocks it's wearing overalls and looks like work.

        The horse world. Two people. Three opinions.

        Comment


        • #5
          Eh, i got a FREE pony last winter, that's really well bred, pretty cute mover, really nice little jumper, super cute with lots of chrome, and haven't gotten any real interest in her. Course, I'm not in a pony meca so things might be different in a better pony area!

          Comment


          • #6
            And don't forget you will have to pay your trainer at least a 10-15% commission on the pony's sale price!

            Comment


            • #7
              Oops, forgot that commission issue that will reduce your profit...and you do need a good agent to sell one at a higher price unless you actually have done so yourself and know a pool of willing buyers at that price.
              When opportunity knocks it's wearing overalls and looks like work.

              The horse world. Two people. Three opinions.

              Comment


              • #8
                I bought an "investment" pony in college and made a tidy profit on him, but I wasn't working on the scale you're talking about.

                My trainer in TN has a horse dealer connection in Lexington, KY who buys cheap trail/games/etc. horses at auction. When he comes across a decent one, he calls us. She knew I was looking for a pony, so when he called about one he'd found, we jumped on it.

                Kody was a 13.1 hand Mustang gelding (BLM brand and all!), around 10-12 years old, plain brown wrapper, etc. He was decently put together and broke to death. I paid $350 for him, including shipping to TN. I pulled his mane, clipped him, and taught him to jump. He didn't need grain or shoes, and he lived on pasture, so my total cost to keep him - including vet, farrier, and board - was about $125/month. I kept him for three months and then started advertising him on Dreamhorse and Equine.com. Within 48 hours, a trainer I knew with a large lesson program came out to try him. She bought him from me for $1,800 as a lesson pony. I'd take on another project like him in a heartbeat!

                So, yes, you can make money on the right pony. But you have to know what you are looking for, be willing to take a chance on a "diamond in the rough", and have the resources to maintain the pony as cheaply as possible.

                Comment


                • #9
                  I just got one two weeks ago we already have some people wanting to come see her she is a wicked been there done that pony that simply became unwanted. and boy can she jump!! I'm in uni now so I don't ride her always, I have other people hop on her, and she will be moving closer to me soon and we'll be getting some kid to campaign her in the mediums until she sells

                  Mind you I am currently paying $150 a month to keep the pony where she is and when she moves it will be $450 a month

                  here are photos of her
                  poppy 1
                  poppy 2

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Sansibar- Did that pony come from NY? Looks like a pony I worked with about 6 years ago.

                    As for the making a profit on a sales horse/pony. Yes you can. But the more money you stick into the pony the more money you need to get out of the pony. Also remember the market is not what it use to be. Yes horses are still selling, BUT most of those are been there done that or beyond fancy.

                    I currently have a 5yr 12h Welsh cross that has done local shows, been used in a lesson program, clean jumper with nice form. All he is missing is his lead changes. No takers. He is not even priced really high. But here is the thing. He is at the stable that I train out of that is a private facility owned by the woman who I own horses with (including him) so he doesn't really cost much a month. It does not matter to us if he sells. That is the big question you have to ask: Will I be in trouble money wise if this pony is a dud? Would I be better puting money away for a horse later? Or if you have $10,000 to spend why not try to find a nice fancy young hunter prospect for yourself right now? Cut out the middle part?

                    Picture of pony for example http://i297.photobucket.com/albums/m...ining/Nico.jpg

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      It can be done but it is hard if you have to board the pony out and pay for training. We have a small pony that we got last year and she is the real deal, beautiful, adorable mover and gorgeous jump and sweet sweet to boot. The whole package! We are lucky because she just fell in our lap, we own our own farm and my DD has done most of the work on her, so we don't have a lot of overhead but the market is still soft and while I would love for her to sell now, it is likely that we will have to keep her for a while longer and campaign her in the greens.

                      I think if have to pay a lot for your prospect and then pay for board and training, your margins will be very tight. You would be better off trying to find a nice green horse for your 10K and then making it up - then you won't have the pressure of having to sell the pony to buy the horse. Somehow, that plan never seems to work the way it is supposed to. I totally know that from experience......

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by GaellentQuest View Post
                        Sansibar- Did that pony come from NY? Looks like a pony I worked with about 6 years ago.

                        As for the making a profit on a sales horse/pony. Yes you can. But the more money you stick into the pony the more money you need to get out of the pony. Also remember the market is not what it use to be. Yes horses are still selling, BUT most of those are been there done that or beyond fancy.

                        I currently have a 5yr 12h Welsh cross that has done local shows, been used in a lesson program, clean jumper with nice form. All he is missing is his lead changes. No takers. He is not even priced really high. But here is the thing. He is at the stable that I train out of that is a private facility owned by the woman who I own horses with (including him) so he doesn't really cost much a month. It does not matter to us if he sells. That is the big question you have to ask: Will I be in trouble money wise if this pony is a dud? Would I be better puting money away for a horse later? Or if you have $10,000 to spend why not try to find a nice fancy young hunter prospect for yourself right now? Cut out the middle part?

                        Picture of pony for example http://i297.photobucket.com/albums/m...ining/Nico.jpg
                        I have no idea I am trying to find some information on her history all I know is that she was called lulu before her old owners had her, she is about 12, and when i say been there done that i mean it! she is auto changes (she just needs to be refreshed and put into shape), she has shown and won a lot, but thats all I really know.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Hate to be a debbie-downer but...I got a free pony, thought I might at least break even training and re-selling. Think again. Not even close. Think about it, one vet bill can blow your whole plan. What if the pony goes unsound and is no longer rideable?

                          To make it work you're going to need to turn the pony over VERY quickly. Unless you get free board and free shows or something crazy like that.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            I do it all the time! But I've found the only way to make money is to keep it small. NEVER turn down an offer that = profit (unless its a really sketchy home of course). I bought one pony for $75 b/c no one could stay on her. After i switched the double twisted wire they had on her to a loose ring and taught her no one would yank on her face she stopped bolting. Sold her 3 months later for $2000. I paid $425 for a large and sold her 2 years later for $4000. Right now I'm sitting on a small that i paid $350 for. He's now jumping around, has a lead change, trail rides, and is beginner safe. I think I'm keeping this one for my son though.

                            However, paying $1060/month in board is NOT going to make you a profit. If you think you can increase the ponies value by over $1000 every month then go for it...but that is highly highly unlikely.

                            Right now i pay $50 in board, my small gets a handful of grain each day, and stays tick fat on cheap grass hay. He's barefoot and only needs trimmed every 8 weeks or so. If i get a hard keeper in they get sold quick before i sink too much into them (ex. my midget TB i just sold. She is tough to keep in the winter, so i took $400 over what i paid for her so i didn't have to pour feed down her throat all winter).

                            For every pony i made a decent amount on there was one i lost a bunch on.

                            Honestly i think you should do it though (if you're not dependent on a profit to survive). Its just flat out fun! Ponies have heaps of personality and always find ways to surprise you. I bought my first pony b/c she was dirt cheap and I wanted something to just trail ride on. Since then I've only bought 1 horse! Ponies are like potato chips, you can't just have one.
                            Donatello - 12.2hh, 9 year old, pony gelding
                            April - 14.3hh, 14 year old, TB Mare
                            Ella - 12hh, 4 year old, pony mare

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              I agree with what's said above... as my trainer said today, "if you want to make a million dollars in the horse business, invest 2 million."

                              AKA... it is nearly impossible to MAKE money, difficult enough to break even. I have owned/boarded/ridden/shown 5+ ponies and never made money... only when I counted the board as a cost I would have spent anyway, did I "make" money, and never when counting shows/board/farrier/vet. (=when you sell a house, you never factor in the necessary costs you would spend no matter which house (electricity, water))

                              Not trying to discourage because it's always tempting if you find a good, reasonably priced prospect, but it is tough to pull it off and even tougher in this economy where, as said above, show masters with records to boot are selling for well below what they should be (15-20k instead of 40k).
                              Vixen Run Farm: Breeding and training ponies for the hunter ring!
                              Breeder of the 2008 PAHBF's Best PA Bred Pony!

                              Comment


                              • #16
                                If you figure out how to make a profit with those kind of expenses, please let me know!

                                I do that on the side, really for fun, and if I break even I am ecstatic. I can board mine for around $350 a month, but it is everything else that adds up quickly. When you start asking $15K or more people normally want show miles which is $$$

                                At the same time, I find the ponies incredibly rewarding! They are my passion and I wouldn't want to do anything else. Just don't expect to get back what you put in. It takes a top quality animal, a good trainer, pony jock and some luck.

                                Comment


                                • #17
                                  Originally posted by Touch~of~Gold View Post
                                  Has anyone on COTH ever experienced buying, training, and selling a pony to make a profit? After college, I am thinking about buying a young, green, medium sized pony, training it, possibly finding a junior rider to show it in the pony hunter/equitation classes, and then selling it for more than what I bought it for. I am hoping to use the money I make selling the pony to buy a young, new horse that I can show in the big time hunters with

                                  I know it sounds crazy, but I would love to give it a try. Over the summer I rode 2 green ponies for a trainer who was doing the same thing that I want to do

                                  I am hoping to buy the pony for 10K or less, pony board at the barn I will keep the pony at is $1060 a month, including 1 private lesson/hack by the trainer a week(the trainer at this barn is a big time hunter rider), I will pay all expenses for a Junior rider to ride it at A and AA shows, and the barn I will be riding with shows in Florida in the winter, I will send the pony to Florida depending on how good it's doing If anyone has any comments or stories, please share them, I need as much advice as possible
                                  Wake up-- you are not in Kansas anymore.
                                  Windswept Stables-Specializing in Ponies
                                  Sales, Breaking,Training,Showing, Stud Service

                                  Home of 2008 Sire of Year Reserve Champion
                                  Pony Hunter Breeding - Empires Power

                                  www.EmpiresPower.com

                                  Comment


                                  • #18
                                    Originally posted by PicturePerfectPonies View Post
                                    I do it all the time! But I've found the only way to make money is to keep it small. NEVER turn down an offer that = profit (unless its a really sketchy home of course). I bought one pony for $75 b/c no one could stay on her. After i switched the double twisted wire they had on her to a loose ring and taught her no one would yank on her face she stopped bolting. Sold her 3 months later for $2000. I paid $425 for a large and sold her 2 years later for $4000. Right now I'm sitting on a small that i paid $350 for. He's now jumping around, has a lead change, trail rides, and is beginner safe. I think I'm keeping this one for my son though.

                                    However, paying $1060/month in board is NOT going to make you a profit. If you think you can increase the ponies value by over $1000 every month then go for it...but that is highly highly unlikely.

                                    Right now i pay $50 in board, my small gets a handful of grain each day, and stays tick fat on cheap grass hay. He's barefoot and only needs trimmed every 8 weeks or so. If i get a hard keeper in they get sold quick before i sink too much into them (ex. my midget TB i just sold. She is tough to keep in the winter, so i took $400 over what i paid for her so i didn't have to pour feed down her throat all winter).

                                    For every pony i made a decent amount on there was one i lost a bunch on.
                                    And that is it in a nutshell. We did the same thing with a 13.1h Welsh cross mare. She had gotten into to many bad habbits with her former rider (chid) and no adults were small enough to ride her. Picked her up for $600 stuck about another $700 into her and sold her 4 a little over 4 months later for $4,000 after all her problems were fixed. But we put minimal time into her, do all the farrier work, it is just the cost of feed, and small purchase price

                                    Now at the same time we purchased that mare we purchased another small pony. Could jump the moon. BUT his little brain was fried. Couldn't make him into a safe child's pony. Sold him as a driving pony.

                                    Comment


                                    • #19
                                      When I was a kid we did this fairly successfully, but only because we looked around and bought cute & athletic ponies VERY cheaply out of people's backyards and then kept them at home (minimal expenses--worming, shots, farrier, no board bills) and then showed them locally and resold them. Some turned out fancy and sold for more, others were just solid citizens who were worth something because they had some training and experience. Let me emphasize that the money did NOT add up to enough to buy a fancy young horse, but it helped pay for our other horses' expenses, and was enough that over time we were able to buy increasingly nicer horses to start with.

                                      I think your current business plan is flawed, because while you MIGHT chance upon a pony prospect that will turn out to be a superstar and sell for enough to cover the expenses you describe, most won't. Plus, laying out such a large amount of cash on an animal that could go lame, colic, maim itself, etc. at any moment is risky.
                                      www.plainfieldfarmky.com

                                      Comment


                                      • #20
                                        Here is an example of a dirty rotten shame/ investment that didn't turn out.
                                        http://i297.photobucket.com/albums/m...ightyMouse.jpg

                                        I picked him up at an auction. He was drugged to the nines. When the drugs wore off he was so scared of people that he would brake out into a white lather and try to climb up the stall walls. Worked with him for a long time. Never got him to calm down. Some days you could ride him, others not so much. Ended up loosing my butt on him. You know the reason? At the time I had to pay board on him.

                                        Comment

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