• Welcome to the Chronicle Forums.
    Please complete your profile. The forums and the rest of www.chronofhorse.com has single sign-in, so your log in information for one will automatically work for the other. Disclaimer: The opinions expressed here are the views of the individual and do not necessarily reflect the views and opinions of The Chronicle of the Horse.

Announcement

Collapse

Forum rules and no-advertising policy

As a participant on this forum, it is your responsibility to know and follow our rules. Please read this message in its entirety.

Board Rules

1. You’re responsible for what you say.
As outlined in Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act, The Chronicle of the Horse and its affiliates, as well Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd., the developers of vBulletin, are not legally responsible for statements made in the forums.

This is a public forum viewed by a wide spectrum of people, so please be mindful of what you say and who might be reading it—details of personal disputes are likely better handled privately. While posters are legally responsible for their statements, the moderators may in their discretion remove or edit posts that violate these rules. Users have the ability to modify or delete their own messages after posting, but administrators generally will not delete posts, threads or accounts upon request.

Outright inflammatory, vulgar, harassing, malicious or otherwise inappropriate statements and criminal charges unsubstantiated by a reputable news source or legal documentation will not be tolerated and will be dealt with at the discretion of the moderators.

2. Conversations in horse-related forums should be horse-related.
The forums are a wonderful source of information and support for members of the horse community. While it’s understandably tempting to share information or search for input on other topics upon which members might have a similar level of knowledge, members must maintain the focus on horses.

3. Keep conversations productive, on topic and civil.
Discussion and disagreement are inevitable and encouraged; personal insults, diatribes and sniping comments are unproductive and unacceptable. Whether a subject is light-hearted or serious, keep posts focused on the current topic and of general interest to other participants of that thread. Utilize the private message feature or personal email where appropriate to address side topics or personal issues not related to the topic at large.

4. No advertising in the discussion forums.
Posts in the discussion forums directly or indirectly advertising horses, jobs, items or services for sale or wanted will be removed at the discretion of the moderators. Use of the private messaging feature or email addresses obtained through users’ profiles for unsolicited advertising is not permitted.

Company representatives may participate in discussions and answer questions about their products or services, or suggest their products on recent threads if they fulfill the criteria of a query. False "testimonials" provided by company affiliates posing as general consumers are not appropriate, and self-promotion of sales, ad campaigns, etc. through the discussion forums is not allowed.

Paid advertising is available on our classifieds site and through the purchase of banner ads. The tightly monitored Giveaways forum permits free listings of genuinely free horses and items available or wanted (on a limited basis). Items offered for trade are not allowed.

Advertising Policy Specifics
When in doubt of whether something you want to post constitutes advertising, please contact a moderator privately in advance for further clarification. Refer to the following points for general guidelines:

Horses – Only general discussion about the buying, leasing, selling and pricing of horses is permitted. If the post contains, or links to, the type of specific information typically found in a sales or wanted ad, and it’s related to a horse for sale, regardless of who’s selling it, it doesn’t belong in the discussion forums.

Stallions – Board members may ask for suggestions on breeding stallion recommendations. Stallion owners may reply to such queries by suggesting their own stallions, only if their horse fits the specific criteria of the original poster. Excessive promotion of a stallion by its owner or related parties is not permitted and will be addressed at the discretion of the moderators.

Services – Members may use the forums to ask for general recommendations of trainers, barns, shippers, farriers, etc., and other members may answer those requests by suggesting themselves or their company, if their services fulfill the specific criteria of the original post. Members may not solicit other members for business if it is not in response to a direct, genuine query.

Products – While members may ask for general opinions and suggestions on equipment, trailers, trucks, etc., they may not list the specific attributes for which they are in the market, as such posts serve as wanted ads.

Event Announcements – Members may post one notification of an upcoming event that may be of interest to fellow members, if the original poster does not benefit financially from the event. Such threads may not be “bumped” excessively. Premium members may post their own notices in the Event Announcements forum.

Charities/Rescues – Announcements for charitable or fundraising events can only be made for 501(c)(3) tax-exempt organizations. Special exceptions may be made, at the moderators’ discretion and direction, for board-related events or fundraising activities in extraordinary circumstances.

Occasional posts regarding horses available for adoption through IRS-registered horse rescue or placement programs are permitted in the appropriate forums, but these threads may be limited at the discretion of the moderators. Individuals may not advertise or make announcements for horses in need of rescue, placement or adoption unless the horse is available through a recognized rescue or placement agency or government-run entity or the thread fits the criteria for and is located in the Giveaways forum.

5. Do not post copyrighted photographs unless you have purchased that photo and have permission to do so.

6. Respect other members.
As members are often passionate about their beliefs and intentions can easily be misinterpreted in this type of environment, try to explore or resolve the inevitable disagreements that arise in the course of threads calmly and rationally.

If you see a post that you feel violates the rules of the board, please click the “alert” button (exclamation point inside of a triangle) in the bottom left corner of the post, which will alert ONLY the moderators to the post in question. They will then take whatever action, or no action, as deemed appropriate for the situation at their discretion. Do not air grievances regarding other posters or the moderators in the discussion forums.

Please be advised that adding another user to your “Ignore” list via your User Control Panel can be a useful tactic, which blocks posts and private messages by members whose commentary you’d rather avoid reading.

7. We have the right to reproduce statements made in the forums.
The Chronicle of the Horse may copy, quote, link to or otherwise reproduce posts, or portions of posts, in print or online for advertising or editorial purposes, if attributed to their original authors, and by posting in this forum, you hereby grant to The Chronicle of the Horse a perpetual, non-exclusive license under copyright and other rights, to do so.

8. We reserve the right to enforce and amend the rules.
The moderators may delete, edit, move or close any post or thread at any time, or refrain from doing any of the foregoing, in their discretion, and may suspend or revoke a user’s membership privileges at any time to maintain adherence to the rules and the general spirit of the forum. These rules may be amended at any time to address the current needs of the board.

Please see our full Terms of Service and Privacy Policy for more information.

Thanks for being a part of the COTH forums!

(Revised 1/26/16)
See more
See less

striving to jump higher

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • striving to jump higher

    Is there a time in your life to stop striving to jump higher? I am 43 years old and started riding when I was 5. I rode on and off due to school and having children but have been back at it for 13 years. I compete in the 3 ft hunters but have a horse that did the junior hunters and the first years successfully. I am in my comfort zone but I feel I should keep pushing myself to jump in the next division. I was champion in a very large AA show recently. My assistant trainer said to me the other day " why does everyone want to jump higher??"

    When is it time to say, This is it? Should we (even as middle adults) keep trying to jump higher? It would be neat to compete at indoors someday, but I am not sure if I am just chasing my childhood dreams or is this something all riders should aspire to??? What are your feelings or experiences, please share with me.....thanks

  • #2
    Originally posted by luckydog View Post
    Is there a time in your life to stop striving to jump higher? I am 43 years old and started riding when I was 5. I rode on and off due to school and having children but have been back at it for 13 years. I compete in the 3 ft hunters but have a horse that did the junior hunters and the first years successfully. I am in my comfort zone but I feel I should keep pushing myself to jump in the next division. I was champion in a very large AA show recently. My assistant trainer said to me the other day " why does everyone want to jump higher??"

    When is it time to say, This is it? Should we (even as middle adults) keep trying to jump higher? It would be neat to compete at indoors someday, but I am not sure if I am just chasing my childhood dreams or is this something all riders should aspire to??? What are your feelings or experiences, please share with me.....thanks

    I think everyone has a different answer to this question, and none of them can be applied as a blanket statement to everyone. If you WANT to pursue those higher goals, go for it, but know that it's okay to be satisfied in the 3ft hunters for the rest of your life.

    I'd talk to your trainer about your goals, and get some feedback from them. Is your current horse capable of competing successfully at higher levels, or would you need to get a new one? If you are not currently riding 5-6 days a week, would that be necessary for moving up? Do you have the resources (time and money, mainly) to move up and be competitive at a higher level?

    These are all questions you should be asking yourself and your trainer. And this doesn't have to be a concrete answer, either. It's okay to start trying to move up, then realize you're not comfortable with the division or that the pressure to qualify is too high, and you can adjust your goals accordingly by going back to the lower levels or showing for fun and not to qualify.

    Best of luck, whatever your division is!

    Comment


    • #3
      Why does everyone want to jump higher?

      For some, it's a personal goal. In the hunters, that 3'6" level for amateurs is the epitome. That's where the best and brightest perform.

      For others, it's pressure to keep up. They feel like losers if they stay at 3'. Even if that is where they are comfortable and safe and are enjoying themselves.

      OP, you're an adult with a real life. Don't forget that this is a hobby. If you enjoy yourself showing at 3', then stay there. The 3'6" level is a whole "nother" deal. I think that in order to do it right, you will need to adjust your training schedule- perhaps some pro rides, another look at your horse's fitness regime, etc. Maybe that would be fun for you, maybe not. Don't be pressured by outside forces.
      http://patchworkfarmga.com

      Comment


      • #4
        I no longer strive to jump higher. A few years back I made peace with my abilities, my age, and my need to stay mostly uninjured (I have my own business). I believe this coincided with the time that I broke my left hand jumping and wasn't able to type for 6 or 7 weeks. Not helpful when you work in public relations .

        Now, I foxhunt, which is probably not the safest equestrian sport, but I no longer jump the really big fences and I have been conservative in starting my new hunt horse.

        I enjoy my riding a lot and once I came to terms with it, I no longer feel that I am in any way "missing out". I have other friends who still push themselves over higher and more technical fences. It works for them but not for me.
        Equine Ink - My soapbox for equestrian writings & reviews.
        EquestrianHow2 - Operating instructions for your horse.

        Comment


        • #5
          I'm only 21 but due to college I've had to seriously cut back my riding/showing time. I pretty much only get to show at one or two AA shows in the summer now so it's hard for me to see all the kids I grew up with and competed against for years and years moving on to the Prix's when I'm struggling to maintain my previous level.

          Before college I was very competitive in the high jrs. We did a few Welcome Stakes for fun and were on the brink of moving up for real when I left for college. Now I have to be content with doing the low a/o's or even just the high schoolings depending on how we're doing. I realized this summer though that I'm just as happy when we do well in the low's as when we did well in the high's.

          I guess my goals have changed since my main focus is school now. I'm in pursuit of my DVM so in the grand scheme of things it doesn't seem to matter as much if I ever get in the Prix ring as long as I'm having fun with my horses. I also have come to realize my own mortality and suddenly even those high a/o jumps seem awfully big. It just doesn't seem worth the risk to me or my horse anymore when showing has become a hobby and not a lifestyle.

          I guess if you're happy where you are and don't feel the desire to move up then you shouldn't. Showing for the majority of us is supposed to be fun and pushing past your comfort zone is anything but. That being said your age should have nothing to do with your decision. I know lots of ammies that ride beautifully and are in the process of moving up who are much older then you.

          Comment


          • #6
            I'm still struggling to come to terms with not being able to move up. I'm 19 (20 tomorrow!) but am starting to realize that jumping sort of scares me I show in the low adults now and feel like if I start doing really well there then I might think about moving up. I am in the process of starting to find a dressage trainer as well. I really enjoy competing and like moving through the levels but feel like perhaps I need to jump for fun and do small competitions. I think it's perfectly okay to know your limits and be safe. However, if you want to move up don't let age stop you
            No hour of life is wasted that is spent in the saddle. ~Winston Churchill
            For Hope, For Strength, For Life-Delta Gamma
            www.etsy.com/shop/joiedevivrecrafts Custom Wreaths and Other Decorations

            Comment


            • #7
              I've had my wonderful horse for 4 years. I do the local 2'6" hunters and AA stuff. He's a great honest guy and I constantly get ribbed for not jumping higher. But I'm just not there yet. Sure he would be a awesome 2'9" or 3' horse but I'd rather go around safely doing the 2'6". My trainer doesn't care, he's happy with our success. And we have constant improvement. As Jim Wofford says "When we get the feeling our horse is improving, the color of the ribbon pales in significance". Mr Wofford is not my trainer but I completely agree with that saying.

              I think its more quality than quantity. But that's just me. A lot of people would say my horse isn't worth a dime since he doesn't jump over 2'6" but he doesnt drop me so I think he's worth his weight in gold.
              Dear life, please send grapes. Sincerely, I prefer wine over lemonade.

              Comment


              • #8
                I'm always striving to jump higher. I want to compete at 3'6 in at least one show next year(junior jumpers) because it's my last junior year. Maybe it's because I've only ridden on and off for 4 years and I'm still young. And also because I haven't found a height level that I'm satisfied with. I don't like jumping under 2'9 and I'm still curious to see what a full 3'6 course is like, so that keeps me wanting to go higher. My friend is the complete opposite; she's almost a year younger than me, ridden since she was seven and has no drive to go higher than 2'6. I think it just depends on the person.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by Oldenburg99 View Post
                  As Jim Wofford says "When we get the feeling our horse is improving, the color of the ribbon pales in significance". Mr Wofford is not my trainer but I completely agree with that saying.

                  I think its more quality than quantity. But that's just me. A lot of people would say my horse isn't worth a dime since he doesn't jump over 2'6" but he doesnt drop me so I think he's worth his weight in gold.
                  Good point! If you and your horse are comfortable, that's what matters There is still a lot to be accomplished by riding well in that division, I would think, given the sheer number of riders who compete at 2'6" (some on VERY expensive and nice horses).

                  As for me, I did not really start riding until I was 27, and I am only now solid at 2'6 and although I have jumped higher and it's a thrill, I am OK with proceeding at 2'6 until I can ride any 2'6 course smoothly with perfect eq (including rollbacks, in-outs etc.) I'm not able to show right now, so I am only driven by my desire for improvement. I think there is still plenty of challenge at the 2'6"-2'9" level especially if you're working on eq-style courses not just standard hunter courses.
                  Love my "Slo-TTB"

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Great question. Riding helps you learn who you are:

                    I am goal oriented. If I don't have some project, trajectory or long-term thing to chase, I'm not happy.

                    I am a perfectionist, so if I'm going to jump (or ride at all), then I want to do that well, not have my performance held together by luck, grit and duct tape.

                    I am also not willing to hurt a horse to get where I want to go.

                    I am not all the way grown up and/or cynical yet, but I'm getting really tired of the way success at our sport is becoming so tightly correlated with the size of the rider's checking account.

                    But see number 1: If I can't find a way to compete or otherwise measure my progress, I don't want to keep spending money in this industry. It seems sort of futile and foolish.

                    All this means that:

                    All things being equal, I'd like to jump bigger. I'd like to buy an OTTB and slowly make him or her into my own regular working hunter. I'd do the jumpers and jump bigger than 4', I suppose, so long as I wasn't getting around with a "guts only" ride. I also wouldn't want to sign up for a division that had me jumping a horse so big that I knew I was using him up prematurely.

                    I'd do the A/O hunters if I could get a horse that would be competitive there. But I'm not willing to "buy my way in." I'd happily compete in an old lady 3'6" eq division if that existed. This way, I think I could get the plainer, cheaper horse, get it very broke and then.

                    For now, I'm satisfied with taking my homemade 3' horse in the old lady eq divisions around me. I think that rewards what I made, doesn't cost a ton, and doesn't invite me to use up my horse like a car or a paper towel.

                    In the future, however, I might "jump ship" and buy a dressage horse or even foxhunt if I can't find a way to make horse showing line up with my values.
                    Last edited by mvp; Sep. 8, 2009, 11:30 PM.
                    The armchair saddler
                    Politically Pro-Cat

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by indygirl2560 View Post
                      I want to compete at 3'6 in at least one show next year(junior jumpers) because it's my last junior year.
                      Do you mean the Children's jumpers? Those are 3'6", but the Adults are the same height, so no worries if you don't make it there in a year The Junior jumpers are quite significantly higher

                      I wonder myself if I'll ever move up again. I've spent the last 6 years between the 2'6" and 3' rings depending on the green-ness of my mount. In my youth I jumped very big fences (4'6" +), but I know I don't have the testicular fortitude required to do that again... But the 3'6" again? I'm not sure...

                      For me it's not a matter of having the horse, it's the time commitment required to move up. I can be busy at work and not ride for a while and still drag my butt out to the 3' ring and if my horse has been kept worked, still expect to do pretty well. At 3'6", no matter HOW prepped your horse is, you still need to ride well to get around safely. The margin for error is SO much smaller than it is at 3'...

                      So I'm planning on hanging out down in the 3' rings for the foreseeable future. It's fun and not too stressful. I think maybe someday I'll get a safe Ch/AA jumper and run around the jumper ring a bit, but do the 3'6" hunters? I may never do them again...
                      Originally posted by tidy rabbit
                      Oh, well, clearly you're not thoroughly indoctrinated to COTH yet, because finger pointing and drawing conclusions are the cornerstones of this great online community.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by ExJumper View Post
                        Do you mean the Children's jumpers? Those are 3'6", but the Adults are the same height, so no worries if you don't make it there in a year The Junior jumpers are quite significantly higher

                        I wonder myself if I'll ever move up again. I've spent the last 6 years between the 2'6" and 3' rings depending on the green-ness of my mount. In my youth I jumped very big fences (4'6" +), but I know I don't have the testicular fortitude required to do that again... But the 3'6" again? I'm not sure...

                        For me it's not a matter of having the horse, it's the time commitment required to move up. I can be busy at work and not ride for a while and still drag my butt out to the 3' ring and if my horse has been kept worked, still expect to do pretty well. At 3'6", no matter HOW prepped your horse is, you still need to ride well to get around safely. The margin for error is SO much smaller than it is at 3'...

                        So I'm planning on hanging out down in the 3' rings for the foreseeable future. It's fun and not too stressful. I think maybe someday I'll get a safe Ch/AA jumper and run around the jumper ring a bit, but do the 3'6" hunters? I may never do them again...
                        Whoops! Yeah I meant Children's jumpers!

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by luckydog View Post
                          My assistant trainer said to me the other day " why does everyone want to jump higher??"

                          When is it time to say, This is it? Should we (even as middle adults) keep trying to jump higher? It would be neat to compete at indoors someday, but I am not sure if I am just chasing my childhood dreams or is this something all riders should aspire to??? What are your feelings or experiences, please share with me.....thanks
                          It certainly isn't somethiing that "all riders should aspire to". But there is no reason not to try if you DO aspire to jump higher.

                          My sister moved up to Advanced level eventing in her mid 40s.

                          I moved up to 3'6" jumpers in my 40s, and hope to get to 3'9" in my 50s.
                          Janet

                          chief feeder and mucker for Music, Spy, Belle and Tiara. Someone else is now feeding and mucking for Chief and Brain (both foxhunting now).

                          Comment

                          Working...
                          X