• Welcome to the Chronicle Forums.
    Please complete your profile. The forums and the rest of www.chronofhorse.com has single sign-in, so your log in information for one will automatically work for the other. Disclaimer: The opinions expressed here are the views of the individual and do not necessarily reflect the views and opinions of The Chronicle of the Horse.

Announcement

Collapse

Forum rules and no-advertising policy

As a participant on this forum, it is your responsibility to know and follow our rules. Please read this message in its entirety.

Board Rules

1. You’re responsible for what you say.
As outlined in Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act, The Chronicle of the Horse and its affiliates, as well Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd., the developers of vBulletin, are not legally responsible for statements made in the forums.

This is a public forum viewed by a wide spectrum of people, so please be mindful of what you say and who might be reading it—details of personal disputes are likely better handled privately. While posters are legally responsible for their statements, the moderators may in their discretion remove or edit posts that violate these rules. Users have the ability to modify or delete their own messages after posting, but administrators generally will not delete posts, threads or accounts upon request.

Outright inflammatory, vulgar, harassing, malicious or otherwise inappropriate statements and criminal charges unsubstantiated by a reputable news source or legal documentation will not be tolerated and will be dealt with at the discretion of the moderators.

2. Conversations in horse-related forums should be horse-related.
The forums are a wonderful source of information and support for members of the horse community. While it’s understandably tempting to share information or search for input on other topics upon which members might have a similar level of knowledge, members must maintain the focus on horses.

3. Keep conversations productive, on topic and civil.
Discussion and disagreement are inevitable and encouraged; personal insults, diatribes and sniping comments are unproductive and unacceptable. Whether a subject is light-hearted or serious, keep posts focused on the current topic and of general interest to other participants of that thread. Utilize the private message feature or personal email where appropriate to address side topics or personal issues not related to the topic at large.

4. No advertising in the discussion forums.
Posts in the discussion forums directly or indirectly advertising horses, jobs, items or services for sale or wanted will be removed at the discretion of the moderators. Use of the private messaging feature or email addresses obtained through users’ profiles for unsolicited advertising is not permitted.

Company representatives may participate in discussions and answer questions about their products or services, or suggest their products on recent threads if they fulfill the criteria of a query. False "testimonials" provided by company affiliates posing as general consumers are not appropriate, and self-promotion of sales, ad campaigns, etc. through the discussion forums is not allowed.

Paid advertising is available on our classifieds site and through the purchase of banner ads. The tightly monitored Giveaways forum permits free listings of genuinely free horses and items available or wanted (on a limited basis). Items offered for trade are not allowed.

Advertising Policy Specifics
When in doubt of whether something you want to post constitutes advertising, please contact a moderator privately in advance for further clarification. Refer to the following points for general guidelines:

Horses – Only general discussion about the buying, leasing, selling and pricing of horses is permitted. If the post contains, or links to, the type of specific information typically found in a sales or wanted ad, and it’s related to a horse for sale, regardless of who’s selling it, it doesn’t belong in the discussion forums.

Stallions – Board members may ask for suggestions on breeding stallion recommendations. Stallion owners may reply to such queries by suggesting their own stallions, only if their horse fits the specific criteria of the original poster. Excessive promotion of a stallion by its owner or related parties is not permitted and will be addressed at the discretion of the moderators.

Services – Members may use the forums to ask for general recommendations of trainers, barns, shippers, farriers, etc., and other members may answer those requests by suggesting themselves or their company, if their services fulfill the specific criteria of the original post. Members may not solicit other members for business if it is not in response to a direct, genuine query.

Products – While members may ask for general opinions and suggestions on equipment, trailers, trucks, etc., they may not list the specific attributes for which they are in the market, as such posts serve as wanted ads.

Event Announcements – Members may post one notification of an upcoming event that may be of interest to fellow members, if the original poster does not benefit financially from the event. Such threads may not be “bumped” excessively. Premium members may post their own notices in the Event Announcements forum.

Charities/Rescues – Announcements for charitable or fundraising events can only be made for 501(c)(3) tax-exempt organizations. Special exceptions may be made, at the moderators’ discretion and direction, for board-related events or fundraising activities in extraordinary circumstances.

Occasional posts regarding horses available for adoption through IRS-registered horse rescue or placement programs are permitted in the appropriate forums, but these threads may be limited at the discretion of the moderators. Individuals may not advertise or make announcements for horses in need of rescue, placement or adoption unless the horse is available through a recognized rescue or placement agency or government-run entity or the thread fits the criteria for and is located in the Giveaways forum.

5. Do not post copyrighted photographs unless you have purchased that photo and have permission to do so.

6. Respect other members.
As members are often passionate about their beliefs and intentions can easily be misinterpreted in this type of environment, try to explore or resolve the inevitable disagreements that arise in the course of threads calmly and rationally.

If you see a post that you feel violates the rules of the board, please click the “alert” button (exclamation point inside of a triangle) in the bottom left corner of the post, which will alert ONLY the moderators to the post in question. They will then take whatever action, or no action, as deemed appropriate for the situation at their discretion. Do not air grievances regarding other posters or the moderators in the discussion forums.

Please be advised that adding another user to your “Ignore” list via your User Control Panel can be a useful tactic, which blocks posts and private messages by members whose commentary you’d rather avoid reading.

7. We have the right to reproduce statements made in the forums.
The Chronicle of the Horse may copy, quote, link to or otherwise reproduce posts, or portions of posts, in print or online for advertising or editorial purposes, if attributed to their original authors, and by posting in this forum, you hereby grant to The Chronicle of the Horse a perpetual, non-exclusive license under copyright and other rights, to do so.

8. We reserve the right to enforce and amend the rules.
The moderators may delete, edit, move or close any post or thread at any time, or refrain from doing any of the foregoing, in their discretion, and may suspend or revoke a user’s membership privileges at any time to maintain adherence to the rules and the general spirit of the forum. These rules may be amended at any time to address the current needs of the board.

Please see our full Terms of Service and Privacy Policy for more information.

Thanks for being a part of the COTH forums!

(Revised 1/26/16)
See more
See less

How do you support your horse habits?

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • How do you support your horse habits?

    Im 13 and im in desperate need for money to pay for lessons. My parents pay for shows/clinics/ect, but they said i need to start pulling my weight because money is getting tight. The summer was very busy! I've talked to my trainor and i do get money off my show bill for working and stuff and i'm out there as much as i can helping out, but i need cash. I can't get a job, and i dont live in a neighborhood, i live in the middle of no where so pet sitting, car wash, all that stuff would be hard. I'm going to try to babysit but im not safe sitter certified, but im going to try.
    Any other ideas?
    Last edited by EquitationRider; Sep. 5, 2009, 04:27 PM.

  • #2
    Learn to braid. It requires a lot of practice to get really good at it, but it's a talent worth having. It both saves you money and makes you money.
    Life would be infinitely better if pinatas suddenly appeared throughout the day.

    Comment

    • Original Poster

      #3
      Originally posted by Sing Mia Song View Post
      Learn to braid. It requires a lot of practice to get really good at it, but it's a talent worth having. It both saves you money and makes you money.
      i have tried to braid and i know a older teenager that knows how to braid. i have talked to her about me and she said she will teach me but it took her two years to learn!! lol im gonna give it a shot though.
      I also know how to clip but im not very good yet but i help my assistant trainor clip the horses before shows

      Comment


      • #4
        As a child I funded my lessons,and showing ( including clothes, tack, etc...) with babysitting. I started babysitting at 13. And still as an adult, I watch a 4 year old little girl to pay for my board.
        If you need ideas on how to get your name out there, to babysit, let me know!

        Comment


        • #5
          Equitation Rider,

          To be taken seriously you'll need to work on your grammar, spelling and capitalization as well. I know it sounds mean but as a teacher, I would never hire someone who typed like you do to watch my children. So edit your posts and use a spell check. It will make you seem much more mature and people will be willing to take your efforts seriously.
          Can you stress-fracture your brain?

          Comment


          • #6
            Im 15. I pay for ALL of my riding expenses except for 150$ a month board--my mom pays for the board-- (All vet bills, farrier, shows, lessons, clinics, supplements, and any other "extra" expenses). I have a job at a small barn right near my house (this is also where I keep my horse). I started working there when I was 12. I pick stalls, feed, water, general barn chores, and even get to ride a few of the horses to keep them exercised. It has worked out great for me.
            From experience, it is your age that will be your biggest issue. People may not take you seriously. It can get really frustrating, but hang in there! If you cant get a steady job working at a barn, definitely learn to braid! You can make a lot of money doing that! Dont limit your options either. The barn I work at focusses mainly on AQHA type horses which, quite frankly, I hate; BUT it keeps my pony fed and keeps me going to shows. Even if it is a western pleasure barn, ask if they need any help feeding and such. You can learn a lot about good horsemanship and not so good horsemanship from working at different barns. Good luck!
            "To do something that you feel in your heart that's great, you need to make a lot of mistakes. Anything that is successful is a series of mistakes." -B.J. Armstrong

            Comment


            • #7
              When I was a kid (around 10) I started cleaning stalls in exchange for lessons. As I became a better rider I started riding for my trainer as well and traded the riding I was doing for all board and training fees. I braided at all of the big horseshows and came pretty close to paying all of my show fees via braiding. It did not take me two years to learn (maybe it would if you weren't motivated to get good at it!). It did take a lot of practice, but I would say that you could get decent enough to braid at lower level shows within a month or two? But again, I would imagine it comes down to how willing you are to really learn and get good at it.

              My friends and I also used to put together little "packages" for people in the barn. We'd clean sheaths for $10, clean tack for $5-10, groom horses, hold horses for the vet and/or farrier, handwalk horses on lay-up, etc. Basically anything the owners might not want to do we would offer to do for money.

              In addition I spent every minute not at the barn babysitting. I had a couple of people who used to come pick me up (and then take me home) to babysit. But you'd definitely be better served to get certified (CPR, etc.) for that these days.

              And I agree with Heineken....to be taken seriously, work on your grammar, punctuation, and spelling. It will come in handy if you ever plan to advertise anything. I've seen flyers posted at my local feed store and I can say for sure that I have no interest in hiring someone who is too lazy to check (or have someone else check) their flyer before they post it. Same goes for e-mails and any other form of written communication.
              __________________________________
              Flying F Sport Horses
              Horses in the NW

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by PNWjumper View Post
                When I was a kid (around 10) I started cleaning stalls in exchange for lessons. As I became a better rider I started riding for my trainer as well and traded the riding I was doing for all board and training fees. I braided at all of the big horseshows and came pretty close to paying all of my show fees via braiding. It did not take me two years to learn (maybe it would if you weren't motivated to get good at it!). It did take a lot of practice, but I would say that you could get decent enough to braid at lower level shows within a month or two? But again, I would imagine it comes down to how willing you are to really learn and get good at it.

                My friends and I also used to put together little "packages" for people in the barn. We'd clean sheaths for $10, clean tack for $5-10, groom horses, hold horses for the vet and/or farrier, handwalk horses on lay-up, etc. Basically anything the owners might not want to do we would offer to do for money.

                In addition I spent every minute not at the barn babysitting. I had a couple of people who used to come pick me up (and then take me home) to babysit. But you'd definitely be better served to get certified (CPR, etc.) for that these days.

                And I agree with Heineken....to be taken seriously, work on your grammar, punctuation, and spelling. It will come in handy if you ever plan to advertise anything. I've seen flyers posted at my local feed store and I can say for sure that I have no interest in hiring someone who is too lazy to check (or have someone else check) their flyer before they post it. Same goes for e-mails and any other form of written communication.
                This is what we would do as kids. My best friend and I talked to our trainer and then wrote up a price list with services. We offered everything from a full body clip to a whisker trim to hand walking/washing legs, cold hosing, sheath cleaning, wrapping etc, etc. Pretty much anything that needed to get done we would do for a reasonable price. It worked really well for us especially since the barn had many adult ammies that had full time jobs and families so not much time for all the extras.

                I had to stop when I swapped barns shortly after since all of that was included in the full board by the grooms but it was nice while it lasted. Now that I'm older (in college) I started doing all of that again for some extra cash along with house/barn/pet sitting.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by EquitationRider View Post
                  Im 13 and im in desperate need for mone to pay for lessons. My parents pay for shows/clinics/ect. but they said i need to start pulling my weight because they cant afford to pay for lessons anymore.
                  I'd suggest foregoing showing for a season or two in order to divert your parent's funds toward lessons. Showing is fun, but it's the riding lessons that will benefit you more in the long run. If you keep on showing without lessoning, you'll never get much better. I'd bet your trainer would let you work of your lessons (instead of your show bill) as well.

                  i have tried to braid and i know a older teenager that knows how to braid. i have talked to her about me and she said she will teach me but it took her two years to learn!! lol im gonna give it a shot though.
                  It probably took her two years because she only did it at shows. Get your trainer to loan you an old, complacent horse who doesn't mind standing still for hours on end. Braid the horse, then unbraid it. Repeat many times, daily, until you get it. Once you get pretty good, take pictures of your work and bring them to local shows; then hang flyers advertising to braid for far less than the going rate because you are "new to braiding but committed to quality work". Before you know it, you'll have quite a clientele.

                  I don't know what "safe sitter certified" means, but even if you're not certified, you can probably be a "mother's helper". It won't pay as well as babysitting, but even $5 to $8 per hour would mean 3-4 hours per week = one riding lesson per week.

                  Sell stuff. I'm sure your parents would love to help you sell Breyer horses or other valuable toys/possessions on Ebay.

                  Offer to make sacrifices when your parents offer to buy you something. For example, if they offer to buy you a cute new shirt at the store, say, "I love the shirt but I'd rather save that money for a riding lesson." They'll be impressed and will probably give you the money.

                  Think outside the box about ways you could "barter" money with your parents. Here's some simple ideas to jog your mind, but think about what would work for your situation:
                  1. Offer to clip money saving coupons on Sundays for products that you know your parents already buy at the grocery. Ask for a cut of the profits--for example, if you clip a 50 cent off coupon and your parents agree that they're likely to use that coupon, ask for 10 or 25 cents in return.
                  2. If your parents are in the habit of driving you somewhere that's close enough by to bike, ride your bike and ask your parents for the difference in gas money. If you don't live close enough but you can be dropped off in a safe neighborhood, put the bike in the car and bike from a few blocks away (and again, ask for the gas money).

                  You can also make money filling in surveys online. As a teen, you are a valuable marketing commodity and companies will pay you about $10/hour to tell them what you think. 13 y.o. is usually the minimum age. For example: http://www.squidoo.com/Jobsforteensunder18
                  Head Geek at The Saddle Geek Blog http://www.thesaddlegeek.com/

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Another vote for braiding. There are simply few jobs in existence that pay as well as braiding does. And you will be able to get work if you do a good job and prove reliable. AND it can fit into your showing schedule, provided you can operate on just a little sleep.

                    It doesn't take two years, but it does take practice and the advice of someone really skilled. The teenager nearby who does it a little may not be good enough to get your braids to professional quality. My advice would be to learn from this person, practice a TON and then try to approach a pro braider at a show and ask to pay that person for a few pointers.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Cleaning tack for the other boarders @ your barn....offer a sort of concierge program.
                      Having their horses groomed, tacked, feet picked out and waiting for them when they arrive. You will need a cell phone and ask for 45 minutes notice.
                      Alot of busy adults would love some customized service @ a reasonable fee.
                      The thing is you have to BE THERE.
                      Also holiday gift wrapping, and if you are good @ any subject in school some sort of tutoring.
                      With the holidays approaching babysitting tailered to holiday shopping and holiday parties.
                      While not all year round you can rack up the $$$ save for lessons.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        work at your barn. not only will this give you money, but this will also give you experience. let people at your barn know that you can baby sit, pet sit, get the mail for them while theyre gone, what ever!!! do anything and everything you possibly can.
                        Be at the barn as much as possible, clean stalls, feed, groom, and help whoever is doing those jobs if you are not, so that your trainer knows you can handle the responsiblity.
                        BRAID!!! braiding will save you money, and make you money.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          The horse was at home and we had a ton of manure so I bagged it in the leftover feed bags and sold it to the local gardeners as well as tomato starts.
                          I'd skip showing and trade the work time for lessons, but go to the show as a go-fer for the trainer. Even as an adult I get pressed into service doing horse care at busy shows, final prep powdering socks, wiping down tack and boots, walking with the little kids to and from the arena when the trainer has two classes back to back.
                          Lots of good ideas here, good luck.
                          Courageous Weenie Eventer Wannabe
                          Incredible Invisible

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            if you can't afford the lessons right now but can afford the shows--stop showing for the fall/winter and have parents pay for lessons while you find a job

                            sorry, it's going to be hard -- no one will take you seriously because youre 13. that's life. i'm 17. i know when i was 13 i thought it was so cruel that people couldn't take me seriously, but now i know why--heck, there are some 8 year olds at my barn that are more mature than the 13 yr olds. some of the 12/13's are also great kids and very respectful and i always take them seriously.

                            keep doing barn work. try personal barn services too, such as braiding, clipping, tack cleaning, show baths, etc. as for braiding--it should not take someone 2 yrs to get the hang of it if they practice consistantly. that being said, i learned to braid years ago and i still suck at it--but that's because i hire a braider when i go to the big shows and i never find the time to practice my braids. get the book Grooming to Win. it teaches you all the different types of braids, as well as how to do quarter marks, and other grooming things. offer to be the groom when you go to horse shows! you will make money that way generally by hour and you'll probably get some tips from the people showing.

                            non-horsey jobs that you could do:
                            - babysitting- not fun, but that's generally what kids your age do for money
                            - dog walking
                            - pet sitting
                            - yard work (could be a broad range of things. maybe you aren;t willing to push a lawn mower around, but you could offer help with garden care -- deadheading plants, pulling weeds, watering and feeding them, general gardencare. and since it's fall, many people are starting to plant their fall bulbs, which is a fairly tedious job but simple enough -- you dig a hole to a certain depth and put the bulb in. you're done--it's just tedious because it's usually a few hundred bulbs.)

                            another good idea is selling stuff on ebay. have your parents create a paypal/ebay account. go through your room and find things that you don't want. (also clean out the tack trunk! it's surprising how many useless things we all have in there that we won't need) and get rid of them! books, too. seriously, you would be surprised at the books you can sell. Do you have those silly useless books your parents have had around for years but never open and they clog up shelves in living rooms and basements? they always seem to be about art or interior design or landscape. old cook books, too. I went through my basement and listed our old useless books like that on amazon.com and ebay (amazon.com is better for books though) and holy cow, i got hundreds from that all i kept thinking was "i can't imagine why this person would pay $30 for this specific old landscaping book, but hey i'm getting money!" it turns out that these things usually were gifts of some sort, for whatever reason. so you're making money and not just getting it back old novels that you don't want to reread are good too. CDs. little collectibles. jewelry. old clothes. all of this can be sold for a surprising amount when it's in good condition. give it a try!

                            i try to sell all my stuff that i don't need online, as well as being a working student and doing personal barn favors for people, and i make enough money to support my pony.
                            (|--Sarah--|)

                            Blitz <3 & Leap of Faith <3

                            Comment

                            • Original Poster

                              #15
                              Thanks everyone! Keep ideas coming.
                              About my speeling/grammer, I rushed through this post this morning before I had to leave, I promise you my spelling and grammer is not as bad as it is seen here.

                              I am definitly going to learn how to braid! I'm going to make some babysitting posters and hope for the best!

                              Any other ideas?

                              Comment


                              • #16
                                Originally posted by EquitationRider View Post
                                Thanks everyone! Keep ideas coming.
                                About my speeling/grammer, I rushed through this post this morning before I had to leave, I promise you my spelling and grammer is not as bad as it is seen here.

                                I am definitly going to learn how to braid! I'm going to make some babysitting posters and hope for the best!

                                Any other ideas?
                                Speeling ??? Grammer ???

                                Oh pumpkin, you're going to have a hard time with this all if you don't even notice that you have spelled both spelling and grammar incorrectly. Definitely learn how to spell "definitely" correctly too. Might be that incorrectly spelled words show up on your computer with a dotted red line underneath them. If they do, pay close attention to that and fix the incorrect spellings you see.

                                Incorrect spelling and poor grammar really do make people appear ignorant, even if they are not. With so much communication occurring by email these days, you really must use the spell check.

                                Good luck with your job search !
                                Last edited by Star Creek; Sep. 5, 2009, 04:13 PM. Reason: fix spelling/grammar !!!

                                Comment

                                • Original Poster

                                  #17
                                  Originally posted by Star Creek View Post
                                  Speeling ??? Grammer ???

                                  Oh pumpkin, you're going to have a hard time with this all if you don't even notice that you have spelled both spelling and grammar incorrectly. Definitely learn how to spell "definitely" correctly too. Might be that incorrectly spelled words show up on your computer with a dotted red line underneath them. If they do, pay close attention to that and fix the incorrect spellings you see.

                                  Incorrect spelling and poor grammar really do make people appear ignorant, even if they are not. With so much communication occurring by email these days, you really must use the spell check.

                                  Good luck with your job search !
                                  Seriously! Again, Spelling and Grammer. I'm really a good at spelling and such but not at typing!

                                  Comment


                                  • #18
                                    Originally posted by EquitationRider View Post

                                    Any other ideas?
                                    My nephew has allergies and was dying to have a dog, but needed something from a breeder like a Poodle or Portuguese Water Dog. When he was maybe 9 or 10 he asked for a patch of yard, turned it into quite a large garden, and grew vegetables that he sold on the corner to folks coming home from work. He earned enough for his dog, and later he funded his X Box, phone, IPod, and computer with his now quite extensive and diverse garden.

                                    It takes a lot of work to keep a really good garden--I sure have the black thumb--but it's done wonders for my nephew all these years.

                                    I mucked stalls, cleaned tack, groomed, did hand walking, longed obese small ponies, was a polo pony groom, painted jumps, stained fences, cobwebbed the barn . . . that worked out as lessons in trade for me.

                                    Also, I would recommend if it is an either/or situation, you use lesson money now and earn show money for future. Without lessons your riding will tat apart.
                                    Eileen
                                    http://themaresnest.us

                                    Comment


                                    • #19
                                      Arrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrr

                                      Originally posted by EquitationRider View Post
                                      Seriously! Again, Spelling and Grammer. I'm really a good at spelling and such but not at typing!
                                      It is grammar, not "er".


                                      On the job front, I worked in family businesses from the time I was eleven. I would do all the grunt work that no one else wanted to do. Swept floors, stuffed envelopes, cleaned and the like. Worked nearly full time in the summers (when I wasn't riding or competing) and part-time after school the rest of the year.

                                      Again, good luck.

                                      Remember, spell check is your friend.

                                      Comment

                                      • Original Poster

                                        #20
                                        Thanks.
                                        I think im going to buy a dictionary as soon as I get some money!

                                        Comment

                                        Working...
                                        X