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Spinoff ... getting kicked out of lesson

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  • Spinoff ... getting kicked out of lesson

    I was surprised to read in another thread that an adult felt she could be kicked out of a lesson -- Does that happen to people?

    I have on rare occassions excused myself from lessons and one clinic, but the idea of an adult being kicked out of a lesson is foreign to me --

    I understand the phenomenom of being kicked out of a barn -- I'm aware of juniors who are disruptive in lessons being kicked out or at least threatenned with it -- But, has anyone actually seen an adult kicked out of a lesson?
    "I never mind if an adult uses safety stirrups." GM

  • #2
    Yeah, I knew a women who got kicked out of a lesson..I guess the trainer was getting frusturated with her, and she was riding a young, green horse! She was really upset and switched trainers after that (which is what I would do). I thought that was crazy!
    But anyways, yeah, I might excuse myself from a lesson (never have but if I ever REALLY felt like I needed to), but if my trainer kicked me out..well...god!

    Comment


    • #3
      yes, once or twice with my wonderful trainer, who is the nicest, most pleasant man you will ever meet, but there are certain things he just won't tolerate... not listening and rudeness were the reasons he kicked the individual out of the lesson.

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      • #4
        I don't know that it is the same as "kicking out" but my trainer told someone that if they kept making the other riders in the group fearful, she couldn't stay in the group anymore.
        The best sports bras for riders are Anita 5527 and Panache! Size UP in Anita, down in Panache (UK sizing)

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        • #5
          Originally posted by AliCat View Post
          I don't know that it is the same as "kicking out" but my trainer told someone that if they kept making the other riders in the group fearful, she couldn't stay in the group anymore.
          What did she do to make them fearful?
          -Debbie / NH

          My Blog: http://deborahsulli.blogspot.com/

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          • #6
            I saw it done ONCE when I was taking lessons as a teenager... another student was getting very nasty with her horse for no reason, I forget the specifics but rider was screaming at/kicking/whipping the horse for something that was essentially her own fault. Girl had a history of blaming the horse for her own mistakes... Instructor took the horse's reins, loudly ordered the rider to dismount and leave the arena. We were all pretty horrified...
            *friend of bar.ka

            "Evidently, I am an unrepentant b*tch, possible trouble maker, and all around super villian"

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            • #7
              I will never forget (or forgive) being excused from a Tad Coffin clinic 25 years ago. I had saved all summer for that clinic ($350 is a lot of money for a 15 year old, especially when I was paying for twice weekly lessons myself) and had been so excited, but the horse that I ended up riding wasn't keen on the exercises. He was asking the group of horses to work nose to tail in a small circle and the horse that I was on was having a melt down over the situation. When I rode just outside the circle, he was fine. Tad tried getting on, but had no more luck than I did with the horse. Rather than letting me continue to participate and ride a circle outside the others, he excused me entirely from the clinic and was not nice about it at all.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by cranky View Post
                What did she do to make them fearful?
                My group was the most advanced that this particular person was teaching on that day. It was getting a little light in participants, and a couple other people wanted to join in.

                At first it was ok, but then one of them started being nervous about courses and voicing it. She would eventually do them (but would usually have a stop or circle somewhere on course). I guess her being nervous and making mistakes made the other new rider in the group even more nervous (since she considered the other girl a more advanced rider). She would then start the course and have numerous stops (because she was so fearful, taking her leg off, dropping etc). I don't know what the real solution is. When the vocal nervous rider is not there, the fearful one rides better.
                The best sports bras for riders are Anita 5527 and Panache! Size UP in Anita, down in Panache (UK sizing)

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by showjumpers66 View Post
                  I will never forget (or forgive) being excused from a Tad Coffin clinic 25 years ago. I had saved all summer for that clinic ($350 is a lot of money for a 15 year old, especially when I was paying for twice weekly lessons myself) and had been so excited, but the horse that I ended up riding wasn't keen on the exercises. He was asking the group of horses to work nose to tail in a small circle and the horse that I was on was having a melt down over the situation. When I rode just outside the circle, he was fine. Tad tried getting on, but had no more luck than I did with the horse. Rather than letting me continue to participate and ride a circle outside the others, he excused me entirely from the clinic and was not nice about it at all.
                  That's kind of awful! I don't think anyone should be excused from a clinic or lesson for having horse troubles. Either help the person work through it in the group exercises or arrange to have a little non disruptive one on one afterwards.

                  In a clinic I was in this spring a boy was having trouble with his horse in such a way that he wasn't really benefiting from the clinic at all. The clinician pulled the barn owner aside and asked if the boy could ride the horse that the clinician was going to school later. Everyone agreed and this way the boy was able to learn without dealing with his horse being naughty. The next day they tried to ride his horse again and he was great.

                  Some people just need to drop their egos and be accommodating!

                  I think that good reasons to excuse someone from a lesson would be rudeness or disrespectful behaviour towards the instructor, the horse or other riders.
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                  • #10
                    I've seen it twice - once an adult rider in a group lesson I was in, who kept talking back and complaining about everything the instructor asked us to do - and the instructor finally lost her temper and told her to leave.

                    And one a rider in a group jumping class at a clinic, who was dangerously overmounted on a very green horse and terribly below level as a rider - after his horse knocked down a jump for the third time and actually fell down, the instructor told him he could audit the rest of the three day clinic but not bring his horse or ride.

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                    • #11
                      I have seen this happen in several barns--most of the time, it was because the student was being disrespectful/rude towards the trainer, OR the student was exhibiting unstable emotions--be it tears or tantrums. Both reasons I think are perfectly legit reasons for a trainer to kick a student, adult or child, out of a lesson.

                      In regards to being disrespectful towards the trainer, it's a waste of time for both parties--the student obviously doesn't want to learn, and the trainer isn't being paid to be snarked at.

                      In regards to unstable emotions, this is honestly for the good of the horse: no horse wants an angry, violent, terrified, or grief stricken rider on its back. It's not productive, and it can do more harm than good with green horses especially.

                      I have been kicked out of a lesson twice for unstable emotions. Once I was just having a really hard time getting my nerve together and had a breakdown, and the trainer gently excused me and said let's try again tomorrow. The other time was for losing my temper as an "angst-y" teenager, and I'll admit, being kicked out of the lesson and off my horse was the best thing that could have happened. I learned my lesson quickly, and to this day I am very, very aware of my emotional state around a horse, and it's helped me in the real world--it now takes quite a bit to really make me lose my temper or get over-dramatic about something!

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        I excused a girl entirely from my program for being a beast to deal with outside of her lesson. Does that count? Treated the horses and the staff poorly out of my eyesight. I never saw it, but I could see she wasn't taking appropriate care of her lesson horse.

                        And the confrontation that ensued with Dad was not pleasant either.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          A student is a student.

                          Age should not matter once they are in an instuctor/student scenario.
                          "The Friesian syndrome... a mix between Black Beauty disease and DQ Butterfly farting ailment." Alibi_18

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                          • #14
                            Of the few people I've had to eject from my lessons, the main cause is not listening, and the way I look at it is, if you're not listening to the directions being given, you're obviously not paying attention, therefore you're a hazard to yourself, the horse, me and anyone around. And usually its been a progressive thing, not just 1 day. And I can't recall the last time I kicked out an adult, although I'm sure it has and if they deserved it, I wouldn't hesitate to do it.
                            Different Times Equestrian Ventures at Hidden Spring Ranch
                            www.DifferentTimesEquestrianVentures.com

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by showjumpers66 View Post
                              I will never forget (or forgive) being excused from a Tad Coffin clinic 25 years ago. I had saved all summer for that clinic ($350 is a lot of money for a 15 year old, especially when I was paying for twice weekly lessons myself) and had been so excited, but the horse that I ended up riding wasn't keen on the exercises.
                              Wow. Was the clinic almost finished when you were excused, or had it just begun? Because a refund should be in order, if it was close to the beginning. Unless he specifically stated in the description that you'd be riding in tight circles, it seems reasonable for a young or green horse to get upset and you'd think you would at least still get to participate....
                              Love my "Slow-T T B"
                              2010 OTTB, Dixie Union x Dash for Money

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                              • #16
                                When I was a teenager, I once had my trainer declare "lesson over" and had me just walk the horse around for the rest of the lesson. It was a terrible experience for me. And no, it wasn't over me being rude toward the instructor (I wouldn't have dreamed of it).

                                I was riding badly, but I hadn't been on a horse in over a month, and I had spent the last 3 months visiting family far away and trail riding cross country (not ring-type h/j like in these lessons). Trainer knew all of the above but was still asking me to do small courses on a new, green horse of hers. I was doing very badly and my trainer got really angry at me when I chipped particularly badly over a fence and hit the horse in the mouth. She said, "That's it, you're done - walk the rest of the lesson and think about whether or not you deserve to ride that horse." We were about halfway into an hour-long private lesson, and I was riding the school horse she had assigned me to.

                                That lesson marked the beginning of the end with that trainer. Still don't know why, except that maybe she was tired of the once-a-week deal (which was all my parents could afford). She was my first instructor and I'd been with her for over 5 years at that point.

                                Comment


                                • #17
                                  I guess I was an adult.. I was probably 20 and I was in a program that really wasn't working for me or my horse. Me and my trainer were not able to communicate well and I was becoming very frustrated and fearful of my horse. I don't deal well with fear (when riding) and I got very emotional one lesson.. ranging from angry to upset and my trainer freaked out on me and basically said he couldn't teach me if it was going to be like that.

                                  Looking back I should have been able to express my fears to him, in the end my horse had major physical issues that were causing his problems (pain issues) and I regret that I wasn't able to see that and frustrated that I was paying someone money that couldn't notice either.

                                  It's all about finding a trainer that you and your horse mesh well with. I've found that I don't do well with male trainers, I feel like I allow them to push me and pressure me more than female trainers. I can express my concerns better to female trainers which benefits me and my horse.
                                  http://www.clarkdesigngrouparchitects.com/index.html - Lets build your dream barn

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                                  • Original Poster

                                    #18
                                    Originally posted by Vindicated View Post
                                    A student is a student.

                                    Age should not matter once they are in an instuctor/student scenario.
                                    I agree with this, but I expect more maturity from adults -- I guess there are always exceptions that prove the rule, but I don't expect to see adults be rude to others or unfair to their horses to the extent that would necessitate them being removed from a lesson --

                                    I can see the unsuitable horse in a group causing a problem -- I really don't expect to see that in a lesson -- I'm used to trainers arranging for the first lesson to be private if they're not familiar with the horse or rider -- Then, I expect them to place the pair in a suitable group --
                                    "I never mind if an adult uses safety stirrups." GM

                                    Comment


                                    • #19
                                      Sometimes my adults are harder and complain more. Whereas my girls will just hop on and do their job. If they have questions, they ask. Otherwise they go for it. But the majority of my kids all have a healthy respect for adults.

                                      Comment


                                      • #20
                                        I've never seen any adults kicked out of my lessons, although most of the time I am riding with teens. Or little kids. It seems that with adults, especially the ones that I ride with, are older and we listen to the trainer with wide-eyed obedience. At least I know I do since I oftentimes feel like I have no idea what I'm doing!

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