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pony is 2 coming 3 not 4 coming 5 like we thought

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  • #21
    Donkey -

    Please explain this to fellow riders of mine who keep trying to tell me I need to work on my horse going forward and getting the 'proper' head set. I hate the term, that's what they want me to do. I'm happy to have a forward moving horse that is slightly infront of the vertical with her poll just above the withers. She may be stock horse, but she's not a nose dragging, tropeing peanut pusher.

    Sorry, stealing is over.

    But at Donkey said, forward work is what you should establish at this point if she's refusing to move forward. Drop everything but the legs and a driving seat to push Pony forward, otherwise Pony may need a break to grow up.
    To be loved by a horse, or by any animal, should fill us with awe-
    for we have not deserved it.
    Marion Garretty

    Comment


    • #22
      Well, this makes me want to share my story.... Not hijacking!

      I had to take a young TB mare to the vet Thursday. While she was there for other things I asked him to take a look at her teeth. She'd been eating a bit funny and the dentist isn't scheduled until next month. He asked me again how old she was (we'd just been through that because he did a new coggins). When I replied "5", he said "Bullsh!t! She's 3-3 1/2". Now I freely admit that I hadn't really looked at her teeth, but I do have her papers. I supposed that there could be a mixup and left it at that.

      The gal definitely had some baby teeth and her teeth didn't look like those of a 5 y.o. I was worried enough that I went home and pulled her papers out. She's a TB and the description on the papers is very detailed. It described her unusual markings along with whorls and tattoo perfectly. I'm going with her registration - she's 5. Maybe she has funky teeth....
      Y'all ain't right!

      Comment


      • #23
        If this pony is the age you describe, and at that age it would be hard to make an age mistake, then you need to lay off her. Give her some time off, you are doing too much both in terms of her mind and her body. She is telling you that.
        www.shawneeacres.net

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        • #24
          I agree with the other pony breeders that you have a good chance of still having a large pony when she is full grown. If she is mature looking enough to have made you think she was 4, then she is most likely not going to grow much more.

          I also agree with the other posters that if she is two then you are doing too much. I usually put 30 days on my two year olds in the fall and throw them out for the winter to start back the next spring.
          www.facebook.com/SunsetPonies

          Comment


          • #25
            It appears that this pony is TWO years younger than she was represented to you by the seller,, This alone is fraudulent, and would concern me , because u paid for an older pony who was more close to a finished age of development, and of an age that she could handle the work and goals you have for her.

            You also cannot predict that she is finished growing and will stay the size you want.

            I personally would be going after the seller in this case, love the pony or not, you were sold something that it is not. I recognize it is your responsibility to vet the pony etc, but two years difference on a young pony is no "mistake" on the sellers part.
            "It's not how good you ride, It's how good your horse covers for you." -Kristan
            Magic Rose Farm- home of Beste Gold & Hot Shot
            Beste Gold & Offspring on Facebook
            Magic Rose Farm Warmbloods on FB

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            • Original Poster

              #26
              Well she will be three in July, ( if the vet and farrier are correct , really who knows at this point??) so I think we will keep riding her, but not on a daily basis. Every other day should be fine as we are mainly walking bending , and trotting. I will stop the cross rails until fall or next spring and work solely on the flat with her. My daughter is a bit upset as she was hoping to so some small shows later this summer. I told her she can still go but only to do the flat classes. We are NOT in a hurry, my daughter is 12 and almost too tall for her, but the GOAL was to end up with a MADE pony for my 5 yr old and we have years before we need her for that! my 12 yr old wanted a project and this was perfect as we will need something for my younger DD in the future. If she grows over that is fine, we mainly ride equitation so they can do whatever they want in that venue no matter what size she ends up. Her personality alone makes her worth her weight in gold to us. She is sooo quiet and allows my two year old to groom her and feed her and lead her around ( with supervision) so whatever happens we will just go slow and take it as it comes. This morning my Dd hacked her out in the woods and she was GREAT, NO spook moving forward and happy. I think we will make SURE to get her out of the ring on a regular basis so she does not get sour.
              Thanks for all of the in put!! I will let you know what size she tops out at!
              Kim
              If you are lucky enough to ride, you are lucky enough.

              Comment


              • #27
                why didn't you look at her mouth when you bought her? It is easy to tell if a horse is under 4 because they still have baby teeth??!? I guess you didnt get her vetted?
                Sorry I don't have a whole lot of sympathy because there is no reason to make that mistake, sure the seller lied to you, but it was dumb to buy her without even looking.
                I sure she is a nice pony, but you will have to wait a little on the intense training.

                Comment

                • Original Poster

                  #28
                  Really, I am not looking for sympathy, we love her, I still would have taken her even if I knew how old she was at the time. I am not looking for anything but ideas on what she should and should not be doing at this point, mainly because we have already started her. We breed horses and then send them off to be broken at around 2-3 , she is WAY past that at this point so I was simply asking how far we should back off. NO sympathy needed, she is part of our family and we love her, she loves us and she will grow up ( and yes maybe over but like I stated several times before I don't care about that either) with our kids its no big deal to me.
                  As for vetting, her , no I did not, she was not overly expensive and I took the seller at her word because she is a friend of a friend, I don't think she lied I think she just didn't know, not a big deal and certainly not something I feel I need to freak out on her about. I KNEW I was buying a very green pony so I assumed she would needs tons of work and time, now its just a bit MORE time LOL. LIke I said not a huge deal to me.
                  Now if I had spent thousands and thousands of dollars on her and found out she was a different age and I needed her to move along quickly I might care a bit more, but in this case its just not a huge issue, its just that much longer we get to have her around!
                  Kim
                  If you are lucky enough to ride, you are lucky enough.

                  Comment


                  • #29
                    Several things here.

                    How is the pony bred? That will tell a lot about what size she'll end up.
                    Second, it's ludicrous for anyone to make a statement that is it's a large pony at two it won't stay one.
                    Thirdly, back in the day, ponies were brought out green at age three like clockwork. Riding a two year old is fine a couple times a week as long as you are wrapping her front legs and not stessing her too much. We've all learned that time is our friend when it comes to breaking the babies. Splint boots or leg wraps are necessary.
                    Randee Beckman ~Otteridge Farm, LLC (http://on.fb.me/1iJEqvR)~ Marketing Manager - The Clothes Horse & Jennifer Oliver Equine Insurance Specialist

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                    • Original Poster

                      #30
                      Originally posted by VirginiaBred View Post
                      Several things here.

                      How is the pony bred? That will tell a lot about what size she'll end up.
                      Second, it's ludicrous for anyone to make a statement that is it's a large pony at two it won't stay one.
                      Thirdly, back in the day, ponies were brought out green at age three like clockwork. Riding a two year old is fine a couple times a week as long as you are wrapping her front legs and not stessing her too much. We've all learned that time is our friend when it comes to breaking the babies. Splint boots or leg wraps are necessary.
                      we do use polos and bell boots on every ride, she is throughbred/morgan cross she looks mature to us, she is filling out nicely. She is not higher in the front or the back, and is starting to bulk up and build muscle.
                      Kim
                      If you are lucky enough to ride, you are lucky enough.

                      Comment


                      • #31
                        How large are the parents?

                        *edited to add that the fact that both are purebreds makes me even more comfortable it's going to be easy to get a definitive answer.
                        Randee Beckman ~Otteridge Farm, LLC (http://on.fb.me/1iJEqvR)~ Marketing Manager - The Clothes Horse & Jennifer Oliver Equine Insurance Specialist

                        Comment


                        • #32
                          Originally posted by Alterrain View Post
                          I hate to be the bearer of bad news, if she's a Large now.... ain't gonna be a large in 3 years.
                          agree
                          horses dont stop growing till 7 and bigger neds mature later as you have broodmares am surprized that you dont know a youngster or how to age a youngster or know the difference between 2 and 5

                          babbies go up and down and in and out till 7 yrs old

                          and i wouldnt be jumping till aged 5yrs and certainly wouldnt do as much work with as you have been hence the sucking back as you call it shes not ready and its blowing her mind away so ease up and reduce the amount of work given shes just not ready for that yet even the amount of flat work given - shes needs to build up from 10.-15mins each side building up into an hour

                          then leave it -- shes to young to do anymore

                          Comment


                          • #33
                            SO.......if she is going to be 3 in July, she was a THREE YR OLD as of Jan 1. I know, i know, not really, but that is the age that she could be sold as and it not be a lie. Example: A pony can get her permanent pony card as a 6 yr old, and that could be in Jan of his 6 yr old year even though he foaled in the spring or summer.
                            Sandy
                            www.sugarbrook.com
                            hunter/jumper ponies

                            Comment


                            • #34
                              Originally posted by goeslikestink View Post
                              agree
                              horses dont stop growing till 7 and bigger neds mature later as you have broodmares am surprized that you dont know a youngster or how to age a youngster or know the difference between 2 and 5

                              babbies go up and down and in and out till 7 yrs old
                              ...sometimes....but it completely depends on the breeds. 99% of breeds like Quarter Horses, Thoroughbreds, Welsh Ponies, etc. do NOT keep growing until they are seven...or even five or six! The rate at which their bones mature is a different story (usually by age six) but does not affect their overall height.

                              Studies have proven that Thoroughbreds and most light breeds of horses will reach 84% of their full mature height by six months of age. So, a TB who is 13.2 HH at six months will reach 15.2 HH by about age two.
                              www.DaventryEquestrian.com
                              Home of Oldenburg, Westphalian & RPSI approved pony stallion Goldhills Brandysnap
                              Also home to Daventry Equine Appraisals & Equine Expert Witness www.EquineAppraisers.com

                              Comment


                              • #35
                                Originally posted by AmandaandTuff View Post
                                I think it's because the OP stated that the pony was a large. If said 'pony' is a large and just coming 3 years old, there is a very high chance that pony will turn into horse.
                                No necessarily. A large can be 13.3 or 14 hands, in which case depending upon breeding, stands a very good chance of remaining a large. All of my larges have been large at 3 and remained large (those I have now are 14.1 1/2, 14.1 1/4 and 14.0 3/4).

                                Comment


                                • #36
                                  It's just going to depend on how pony matures. My mare was sticked at 16.0 at three year old, she's 17.2 at five years old and butt high again.

                                  If you like the pony, just give her some easy rides and enjoy
                                  To be loved by a horse, or by any animal, should fill us with awe-
                                  for we have not deserved it.
                                  Marion Garretty

                                  Comment


                                  • #37
                                    As a three year old of non-slow-maturing breeding, I would be riding 2-3 times a week max, doing light flatwork, trot poles, and trail rides. I would also be sure to give her atleast a few solid weeks off whenever she gets uneven in height, is acting up, etc. Take her on lots of trailer rides to see things, and then eventually take her to do walk-trot classes.

                                    I'd probably give her much of the winter off, and start her back up again in the spring- and add jumping, lead changes, and lounging in side reins, etc. as she feels ready. Assuming all goes well (hahaha) I'd shoot to be jumping around the short stirrup or 2' hunters at shows next summer, and maybe children's hunter pony in the fall. Then she will be totally ready for her green year.

                                    Comment

                                    • Original Poster

                                      #38
                                      She does her changes now , we did not teach her she just does them ( what a nice break aye?) and I agree 2-3 days a week is enough and we will ride out of the ring at least one day. We are going to take her to a few shows this summer just to hack around and see the sites, DD is fine with not entering any classes, and just getting her used to the commotion
                                      Of course there is plenty of that at home too, babies in strollers, gators, 4 wheelers, bush hogs, back hoes, tractors, kids with HUGE umbrellas in the ring the other day when it started to rain, and NONE of it phases her. It will be interesting to see how she does out of her own environment.
                                      Honestly i am amazed at her sanity especially for her age. Our babies are usually this quiet, but they are born and raised with all of the commotion on our farm, she was not.
                                      I want to take it slow and make sure we do a good job, she is too sweet to stress out and ruin.
                                      I also think her age has a lot to do with how attached she is to DD already, she looks for her each morning as we come down to feed, and she stands at the fence everyday after DD puts her away after her ride until we are back in the house. she will come when Dd calls her, and she LOVES our 2 yr old, she is very careful around her and will eat cookies out of her hand without even touching her LOL its so cute to watch.
                                      I don't care at all how old she is or how big she gets, this one is a keeper and she will be with us for a very very long time, heck it will be years before the 2 yr old can ride a Large or in this case maybe a Hony??
                                      And for those of you who are freaking out, yes I have learned my lesson , I will have the next one vetted and be sure of their age!! I promise!
                                      Kim
                                      If you are lucky enough to ride, you are lucky enough.

                                      Comment


                                      • #39
                                        I'm glad to hear you're happy either way I bought my mare as a weanling sight unseen, she was tiny. I was hoping she'd stay hony sized (I'm only 5' tall..) but she ended up getting to 17 hands Still happy to have her, even if I have to use a flight of stairs just to get my stirrups.
                                        To be loved by a horse, or by any animal, should fill us with awe-
                                        for we have not deserved it.
                                        Marion Garretty

                                        Comment

                                        • Original Poster

                                          #40
                                          Originally posted by AmandaandTuff View Post
                                          I'm glad to hear you're happy either way I bought my mare as a weanling sight unseen, she was tiny. I was hoping she'd stay hony sized (I'm only 5' tall..) but she ended up getting to 17 hands Still happy to have her, even if I have to use a flight of stairs just to get my stirrups.

                                          OH my gosh that is HUGE!!!! that is too funny! we are very happy to have our girl, she will be a part of our family for a very long time!
                                          Kim
                                          If you are lucky enough to ride, you are lucky enough.

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