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Baby Greenie Support Group - March Madness

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  • Baby Greenie Support Group - March Madness

    So maybe you all have been following my travails with Mickey. If not, the basic story is that we switched trainers, made a ton of progress, then made a huge regression and started stopping.

    So I've decided that I need to make jumping simple and easy and let him find his rythm instead of me trying to place him because I get so worked up in trying to get it right that it makes us both nuts.

    This morning I got up in 2 pt and did my w/t/c laps. While I was doing my t/c laps, I decided to just add a jump that was at the end of the arena. No biggie, just a small x. But what I did was just stay where I was in 2 pt - don't push him forward or pull him back for a distance (of course push if I feel him hesitate, though), just let him figure it out.

    He was so fabulous! He just popped over it like it was no big deal. I could feel him hesitate the first couple of times, but I added leg, gave him a cluck and he went over. The rest of the time he went straight for it. While cantering he took the long spot, but I didn't try to fight him on it. Just let him keep his pace and his rythm and fit in what he could.

    Do you guys think I'm on the right track? Once he gets his confidence back (and I get mine back that he will indeed go over), then I'll work on adjustability of the pace. Right now, though, I just want it to be a pleasant experience for him.

    "It's amazing how there's no time to do it right the first time but always time to do it over again."
    "A horse's face always conveys clearly whether it is loved by its owner or simply used." - Anja Beran
  • Original Poster

    #2
    So maybe you all have been following my travails with Mickey. If not, the basic story is that we switched trainers, made a ton of progress, then made a huge regression and started stopping.

    So I've decided that I need to make jumping simple and easy and let him find his rythm instead of me trying to place him because I get so worked up in trying to get it right that it makes us both nuts.

    This morning I got up in 2 pt and did my w/t/c laps. While I was doing my t/c laps, I decided to just add a jump that was at the end of the arena. No biggie, just a small x. But what I did was just stay where I was in 2 pt - don't push him forward or pull him back for a distance (of course push if I feel him hesitate, though), just let him figure it out.

    He was so fabulous! He just popped over it like it was no big deal. I could feel him hesitate the first couple of times, but I added leg, gave him a cluck and he went over. The rest of the time he went straight for it. While cantering he took the long spot, but I didn't try to fight him on it. Just let him keep his pace and his rythm and fit in what he could.

    Do you guys think I'm on the right track? Once he gets his confidence back (and I get mine back that he will indeed go over), then I'll work on adjustability of the pace. Right now, though, I just want it to be a pleasant experience for him.

    "It's amazing how there's no time to do it right the first time but always time to do it over again."
    "A horse's face always conveys clearly whether it is loved by its owner or simply used." - Anja Beran

    Comment


    • #3
      Batgirl, sounds like you have a plan that is working for you. I believe I would stick with it as long as you are both having fun.

      Good March BGSG Topic.

      Member of the Baby Greenie Support Group
      Remember, dear, if you're not bleeding and a fairly vital organ is not hanging out of your shirt, you keep riding
      Finally down to a manageable number!

      Comment


      • #4
        It sounds like you're well on your way. It's difficult to ride a horse when he has no confidence, especially if you are lacking in confidence yourself. I have a hard time riding horses that don't have trust in me.

        Keep it up!

        .:Erin B #2:.
        You cannot stop us, you cannot bring us down,
        Never give up, we go on and on.
        -Erin B-
        ********************
        \"I am fairly agile, I can bend and not break. Or I can break and take it with a smile. I am so resilient. I recover quickly. I\'ll convince you soon that I am fine.\" (\'Bend and Not Break\', DC)

        Comment


        • #5
          When I learned to ride in the 60s, it was all about finding a distance, or even "making" a distance, ie, seeing something you wanted and adjusting the horse's stride to make it work.

          Now I'm belatedly realizing that it's not about the distance at all. It's about the pace. Once you can find that good consistent pace, and hold it, the good distances will magically appear. Trust me on this. [img]/infopop/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif[/img]


          So yes, I think you're doing exactly the right thing working on your pace.
          www.laurienberenson.com

          Comment


          • #6
            Sounds like letting your horse find out he CAN go over something is a very good first step. Let him learn that, and I suspect he'll also begin to learn how to go over from a better spot.

            I suppose you could also try cantering a ground pole or two on the circle of death, too. Maybe stay in two point when you do?

            I'm STILL having a horrible time with that exercise, but then I just seem to be in some kind of riding funk anyway. I injured my neck/shoulder -- get this, sleeping! Yup, woke up two days ago in the middle of the night with such pain it made me nauseous! I rode today -- not well, but I did ride. The muscle is looser, but not released yet.

            Ash, however, seems to be having the spring hissy fits or something. He's just been very inconsistent, which is unlike him. And I am in one of those riding slumps, I'm afraid. Just don't feel like I'm really in tune and nothing is going right. Hopefully it will pass for both us us soon.

            Comment


            • #7
              oh, and something else...

              This is LaurieB's typical horse show round: I trot into the ring thinking, okay, hold your pace coming out of the circle, leg yield into the corner, keep her straight, get your change, don't let her drift left...

              I do three lines just that way. Then I come around the last corner and begin to think, hey, this is going pretty well. now all I have to do is find one more distance and I'm home free...

              Guess which fence I always blow? [img]/infopop/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif[/img] [img]/infopop/emoticons/icon_rolleyes.gif[/img] [img]/infopop/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif[/img]

              I'm telling you, that distance thing is a killer.
              www.laurienberenson.com

              Comment


              • #8
                I couldn't agree with Laurie more. I'm just starting to learn about "finding distances" and what I've learned is.....DON"T. If I try to "see" the distance I invariably fiddle with my horse and screw him up. If I try to find the PACE, and KEEP IT CONSISTENT -- we go over like a flowing river all round and smooth.

                That's partly why I think that just riding your horse and letting HIM find his way is so important. It also teaches you to feel what his best pace is on those times he meets the jump just right.

                But, one problem I have is in making the transition from training in two point to riding in the hunter hover or even on the saddle. For some reason, if I have to do anything with my upper body the whole thing falls apart. I'm working on it, but not getting it at all yet.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Sounds to me like you are on the right track!

                  Gaining confidence in my horse and myself is my biggest problem.. after owning a stopper I get kind of nervous once and a while.

                  My horse right now a 4 yr. old, I'm just focusing on letting her find her spots, granted sometimes she takes the one that I want<the longer more away from the jump approach, instead of her close to the base and round into a ball approach>

                  Sounds like you and your horse are doing good. [img]/infopop/emoticons/icon_smile.gif[/img]

                  "for want of a nail, the shoe was lost.
                  For want of a shoe, the horse was lost.
                  For want of a horse, the battle was lost.
                  From the loss of the battle, a war was lost."

                  Member of the Baby Greenie Support Group <Part 2>

                  NH clique

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Unfortunately, the only way to get a baby greenie to canter fences confidently is to canter fences confidently!Which means there will be a ton of missed distances and awkward take-off spots. You just have to stick to your rhythm and pace and NOT over ride to cram your horse into "that perfect spot".

                    This is yet one more of those riding things that is easier said than done. [img]/infopop/emoticons/icon_rolleyes.gif[/img]

                    "You just keep thinkin', Butch. That's what you're good at." -- The Sundance Kid

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      I have hit a low spot.
                      Elliot is doing wonderful. He does lug and lug but doesn't really get going fast, and now since my lawn dart experience...I am holding on and slowing him down instead of lightly pulling his head up and pressing on.
                      It is a vicious circle I know.

                      I am not afraid of the jumps, he comes into them wonderfully twice yesterday in my lesson my wonderful trainer complimented me on moving him on when needed, but I hastily told her it was not me that did that it was "Elliot"
                      [img]/infopop/emoticons/icon_smile.gif[/img] I know that is good, but I am finding that I have some lack of passion for the landing side and pushing him on, like I am waiting for that head drop and right shoulder disappearing with a flick up of the buttocks on Elliot's part.
                      My balance is wimpy at best right now.

                      Back to the gymnastics and trotting poles and riding without hands over them to get the heel back down and the balance less likely to be "launched", (my trainer's new word "Launch"), out and over the arena wall [img]/infopop/emoticons/icon_eek.gif[/img] [img]/infopop/emoticons/icon_redface.gif[/img]
                      He jumps so round and sometimes so big I have to learn to do this. Olde age is awful.

                      [img]/infopop/emoticons/icon_wink.gif[/img]

                      "Have You Hugged Your Trainer Today?"
                      http://community.webshots.com/user/cotswoldjr
                      http://temp.hillcresttrainingnet.off...m/default.aspx
                      [url]
                      Starman Babies

                      Comment

                      • Original Poster

                        #12
                        that's what I was thinking. I've got to get rid of my perfectionism and let it come as it may. If I chip, so what - if I go long, so what...let him learn from the bad spots and the good spots alike so he knows what feels best for him. It was hard to not interfere this morning. I just wanted to grab his face and say "no, squish together a little bit and we can fit one more step in!" so we ended up going long a few times but he kept his pace and didn't rush to or away from the jump.

                        I'll keep plugging away!

                        Luckily I have a dear friend who also rides at 6:30 / 7 a.m. so we've agreed to each pick a day where the other person will be ground person and set jumps,poles,whatever, so we can help each other figure things out.

                        "It's amazing how there's no time to do it right the first time but always time to do it over again."
                        "A horse's face always conveys clearly whether it is loved by its owner or simply used." - Anja Beran

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          In Baby Greenie Land we call 'em those "other" distances... [img]/infopop/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif[/img] [img]/infopop/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif[/img]

                          And every baby needs an introduction! [img]/infopop/emoticons/icon_wink.gif[/img]

                          Everyone's right - it is all about pace and rhythm. And right from the beginning I put most of my training emphasis on rhythm. I don't worry to much about the speed of the gait, I let them get comfortable in the gait that their balance allows them to have, and as long as it isn't full tilt, hell bent from leather, we learn first about rhythm and consistancy. Then after we have managed that, we go on to working long and low, then gradually moving that bee-hind up into a frame [img]/infopop/emoticons/icon_smile.gif[/img] And pretty much from the beginning I have them going over something, even if all they can manage is a pole at the walk.

                          I built a rather crude jump shute today and introduced RV to it. He is really a pretty agreeable fellow - it was basically just a jump with poles set on the standard to guide the lunge line over, and he never blinked an eye, just went on through! [img]/infopop/emoticons/icon_cool.gif[/img] I built it up to a decent 2'6 and he just trucked on over [img]/infopop/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif[/img] Oh yea, and my (highly irrational) fears about this horse's jump were laid to rest...

                          February Greenies


                          "You can pretend to be serious; you can't pretend to be witty. "
                          - Sacha Guitry (1885-1957) *
                          Your crazy is showing. You might want to tuck that back in.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Hmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmm

                            Is Whisper a greenie? LOL he doesnt seem like it- i dont think he is..

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              My greenie doesn't lack for confidence, but he doesn't always have the coordination to pull off the "other" distances. He couldn't chip, but instead preferred to launch from half a stride away. So we had to work on chipping and figuring out a way to get over the jump from anywhere, just to make him safe. Of course, when we were supposed to be finding a chip-type distance, I kept coming up on the perfect distances, time after time. And now that we're getting ready for our first horse show, the chip is everywhere.

                              --R

                              Comment


                              • #16
                                I must add here that all of our greenies canter like a bazillion ground rails long before they canter any sort of "jump". All along they're trotting fences with cavaletti or trot poles to help them. Then, eventually, we trot a little exercise, land cantering, canter a pole, then, whoopee, canter the low jump.

                                And yes, we often meet and greet the "other distance". [img]/infopop/emoticons/icon_rolleyes.gif[/img]

                                "You just keep thinkin', Butch. That's what you're good at." -- The Sundance Kid

                                Comment


                                • #17
                                  <BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by Merry:

                                  And yes, we often meet and greet the "other distance". [img]/infopop/emoticons/icon_rolleyes.gif[/img]<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

                                  Greet it? GREET IT!?!?!? I take it out for a seven course meal at the finest restaurants!!! [img]/infopop/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif[/img] [img]/infopop/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif[/img] [img]/infopop/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif[/img]


                                  "You can pretend to be serious; you can't pretend to be witty. "
                                  - Sacha Guitry (1885-1957) *
                                  Your crazy is showing. You might want to tuck that back in.

                                  Comment


                                  • #18
                                    Thankfully Trick will go from just about anywhere als long as he is not totaally crooked (which is always my fault). My trainer loves him, lol, when we get a new jump as long as I don't pull him off he just goes right over and makes sure he dosen't hit it. (Those new jumps bite you know [img]/infopop/emoticons/icon_wink.gif[/img] )

                                    Comment


                                    • #19
                                      Why a timely topic for my return to the board. Parminch can attest to my expertise on finding "the other distance", and in public, at a schooling show she was running, down here in gorgeous Southern Pines, NC. Much to my total embarrassment...... I generally do not plan on practicing the "other distance" at a show, but Mikey insisted, so we did....

                                      We will now stay home until we decide when and where we are going to work on that dastardly "other distance" (and take a couple of lesons for good measure.)

                                      Speaking of S Pines, I am so in love with this place, that I am selling my place in Lexington and building here and moving here permanantly. S Pines is God's gift to the horse person. Unbelievable. Wish I had never left 20+ years ago. I just did not appreciate it enough back then....

                                      PS Health seems to be 90% better -- good enough to ride. (and an excuse for not having tight enough legs to ride without stirrups... :O))

                                      What did I miss in the last 2 months?
                                      "He lives in a cocoon of solipsism"

                                      Charles Krauthammer speaking about Trump

                                      Comment


                                      • #20
                                        I am so happy to see you are on here tonight!!!

                                        You sound so much better....and happier.

                                        [img]/infopop/emoticons/icon_smile.gif[/img]

                                        "Have You Hugged Your Trainer Today?"
                                        http://community.webshots.com/user/cotswoldjr
                                        http://temp.hillcresttrainingnet.off...m/default.aspx
                                        [url]
                                        Starman Babies

                                        Comment

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