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Spoiled vs. Lucky horse kids how do you define the difference.

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  • Spoiled vs. Lucky horse kids how do you define the difference.

    DH and I always have this argument - he thinks all horse show kids are spoiled. Having boarded at a show barn with some extremely nice, polite, helpful show kids, I disagree. I think those kids are just lucky being born into weathly families.

    Now, I know there are spoiled horse kids - ones that throw out non-primary colored ribbons on the way out of the ring and treat their parents like crap, kick their horses in the gut after a bad ride etc...

    But, how do you define the difference- I need some ideas to better get my point across.

  • #2
    Easy--spoiled kids make me want to tear my hair out, lucky kids do not.
    I love my Econo-Nag!

    Comment


    • #3
      Lucky:

      Will ride one horse back to the barn at a show to get the second one rather than making the groom walk one 15 minutes back and then the next one out.

      Will help out by holding a your horse while you run to the bathroom. Or running to the show office to do an add/scratch. Or running back to the barn to get something.

      Either walks their horse out after riding or nicely asks the groom.

      Always thanks the trainer after a lesson.

      Is the kid that you want to take along when a group is going out to spectate at a show, or make a tack store run, or grab something to eat.
      The Evil Chem Prof

      Comment


      • #4
        Lucky

        Simple its the kid you want in every barn all the time - the kid that is the first to congratulate a competitor and the last to complain - the kid who always takes the blame for a bad round and always gives the credit to their horse for a good one - the one that is the first to help and the last to leave - its the kid who waits to melt down on those bad days until they are in the provacy of their hotel or house...

        Its not hard to spot but it is hard to come by

        Comment


        • #5
          The lucky ones realize that they are lucky and truly appreciate what they have. They are not the least bitt afraid of hard work. They understand that they are a large part of the equation in riding success and do not tend to blame the horse, trainer, etc when the don't do well When they do well, they are quick to attribute their success to horse, trainer, yet they also recognize that their own hard work played a role. They are focused on being a better rider and horseman/woman versus winning all the time.

          Comment


          • #6
            Lucky is the one who lucked out to be able to afford the nicer horse but works hard at the barn. Cleans tack, cleans stalls, grooms her horse, just enjoys hanging out at the barn. Is always willing to lend a helping hand by sweeping the aisle or throwing hay when she knows the BO is having a rough day. At shows she's the one who can be found supporting everyone else when she isn't showing and polishing boots at the in-gate. All-in-all just a good person to have around.

            Spoiled is the one who loses one class and immediately wants to sell the horse and get a new one. Spoiled is the one who has the groom tack the horse up and then hands the horse back to said groom when her class is done and immediately is on her cell phone. Spoiled blames the horse for not winning when the horse clearly saves her each time because she thinks she's perfect and doesn't need to learn anything. Spoiled looks at you in that disgusted way if you even ask her to hold another horse. Spoiled is the one that (if you don't already have kids) makes you never want to have kids. Spoiled is the one that drives you to drink if you have to be around her for a week long horse show, haha jk
            No hour of life is wasted that is spent in the saddle. ~Winston Churchill
            For Hope, For Strength, For Life-Delta Gamma
            www.etsy.com/shop/joiedevivrecrafts Custom Wreaths and Other Decorations

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            • #7
              The spoiled ones don't treat "the help" (grooms, braiders, etc.) like people - just scenery. They don't make eye contact, don't try to remember names, or even talk to them beyond "I need X Horse at 10:30."

              Lucky ones do.

              This test, oddly enough, works on adults, too. You can tell a lot about a person by how they treat service workers - grooms, waiters, house cleaners, whatever.

              Comment


              • #8
                Any child that has the opportunity to be around horses are lucky in my book. You don't necessarily have to be wealthy but yes you need to have some means for this hobby. Spoiled is having everything handed to you without working for it. Having your trainer do all the work so you can win.

                Ones that throw out non-primary colored ribbons on the way out of the ring and treat their parents like crap, kick their horses in the gut after a bad ride are considered bad sportsman period.

                The ones you see at the barn early in the morning to feed, walk, muck, water, groom etc... are the lucky ones. More than likely those are the same ones congratulating their competitors and always have a smile on their face. They put their best foot forward and have a true love for the sport. Those are the lucky ones.

                My daughter has been showing for years and would not trade one moment of it. The experience has shaped her into the responsible teenager she is today with compassion and great sportsmanship.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by angrychinchillas View Post
                  The spoiled ones don't treat "the help" (grooms, braiders, etc.) like people - just scenery. They don't make eye contact, don't try to remember names, or even talk to them beyond "I need X Horse at 10:30."

                  Lucky ones do.

                  This test, oddly enough, works on adults, too. You can tell a lot about a person by how they treat service workers - grooms, waiters, house cleaners, whatever.
                  Someone told me once that you can always judge a guy based on how they treat the waiter. Works well with horse people and grooms I'm guessing!
                  No hour of life is wasted that is spent in the saddle. ~Winston Churchill
                  For Hope, For Strength, For Life-Delta Gamma
                  www.etsy.com/shop/joiedevivrecrafts Custom Wreaths and Other Decorations

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Along with what everyone else has said....

                    Spoiled and lucky children are made by their parents (sorry folks it's true)

                    Lucky children are taught from the beginning that this is a privilege not a right, if a any point in time they are rude to parents, horse, trainer, or other exhibitors then their horse is going for sale! (I bet if you ask those kids why they are so polite they will give you an answer that is similar when interpreted)

                    Spoiled children are the ones who think the are entitled to their horse. When they get a 2nd place behind their biggest competitor and the parent always says they put in a better ride, had a better pony etc. No matter how the ride went. They could have picked up the wrong lead right in front of the judge and still get told they are better and should have placed first.

                    That is the biggest problem IMO as a former lucky kid, a trainer and a parent! (trust me I knew better then to act like a snot! I wanted to keep my horse)

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      I'm surprised that throwing out ribbons is in the same league at all as kicking your horse because you're pissed off or treating "the help" like crap. Honestly, I don't keep ribbons unless the class held a special significance. How I rode and how my horse went is more important to me at the end of the day than the ribbon in and of itself.
                      -Grace

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by TheOrangeOne View Post
                        I'm surprised that throwing out ribbons is in the same league at all as kicking your horse because you're pissed off or treating "the help" like crap. Honestly, I don't keep ribbons unless the class held a special significance. How I rode and how my horse went is more important to me at the end of the day than the ribbon in and of itself.
                        You're right how the horse goes and how you rode is more important than a ribbon..... but for all those who work hard and never get a ribbon, those ribbons do look important and picking them up and taking them with you (even if you later throw them out) shows respect for the process -

                        Just my opinion

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          The ones you want to smack are the spoiled ones.


                          The ones you want to take home are the lucky ones.



                          I think if it's your own kids that DH might be worried about, you might point out that it's all in how you raise them. Don't do your homework? Not allowed to ride. Disrespect someone else? Don't get to ride. Throw a fit? You get ripped off that pony in front of everyone and sent home. Don't take care of your horse? That one deserves to be locked in the closet without meals, in my opinion.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by TheOrangeOne View Post
                            I'm surprised that throwing out ribbons is in the same league at all as kicking your horse because you're pissed off or treating "the help" like crap. Honestly, I don't keep ribbons unless the class held a special significance. How I rode and how my horse went is more important to me at the end of the day than the ribbon in and of itself.
                            There's a difference between turning ribbons back into the show office and dramatically stuffing them in the trash barrel or throwing them down in the dirt. ;^)
                            Life would be infinitely better if pinatas suddenly appeared throughout the day.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Sing Mia Song View Post
                              There's a difference between turning ribbons back into the show office and dramatically stuffing them in the trash barrel or throwing them down in the dirt. ;^)
                              Agreed. I think that was what the OP meant.

                              Comment


                              • #16
                                I acctually think the lucky ones are the girls that don't have anything handed to them. My parents pay for board and thats it. Its up to me to pay for lessons and shows. I help at the barn every day after school, and you can bet I'm never rude to the grooms because I'm one of them! And you know what? I wouldn't want ut anyother way. Sometimes I wish I could buy a ready to go junior huntrr, but then I realize there wouldn't really be any point in riding. I enjoy my $300 rescue, he has taught me more than I think any horse ever can. Next year we'll be debuting in the juniors. And if I put in a good round, it'll be all on him I consider myself "lucky" because even though I'm not quitr there yet, I know eventually I'll be a great horsewomen.

                                Now that I typed that all out I realize that it doesn't really answer your question, but this does:

                                Spoiled- complains when thier trainer asks them to ride a greenie or not quite that fancy horse

                                Lucky- will gladly. Accept the chance to ride any horse, even if its just walking the 26 year old lesson horse around the ring for 20 minutes. And you can bet they will groom it and give it lots of love.

                                Comment


                                • #17
                                  The spoiled ones have somebody on the sidelines with a water bottle even when it's 66 degrees and raining just in case they need it.

                                  The lucky ones get a drink out of the cooler at the ingate while they are waiting to hack even tohugh their daddy owns Poland Spring!
                                  Timothy, stop lurking

                                  Comment

                                  • Original Poster

                                    #18
                                    Originally posted by Sing Mia Song View Post
                                    There's a difference between turning ribbons back into the show office and dramatically stuffing them in the trash barrel or throwing them down in the dirt. ;^)
                                    Thanks- that's what I meant. Throwing them out right in front of the other kids that may have been hoping for any ribbon. I have no problem with people not keeping ribbons if they don't want them - but dramatically tossing them in front of a crowd as part of a hissy fit is not exactly classy IMO.

                                    Comment


                                    • #19
                                      Originally posted by DancingQueen View Post
                                      The spoiled ones have somebody on the sidelines with a water bottle even when it's 66 degrees and raining just in case they need it.
                                      I don't know about this one. I consider myself to be one of the 'lucky' ones. My dad was a huge supporter and loved to watch me show often scheduling his business trips around the biggest classes of the year so he could come and watch. I don't think having someone on the sidelines supporting you makes you spoiled.

                                      Now if my dad had PAID someone to specifically stand there with a water bottle just in case or if I had thrown a fit when he couldn't attend that would for sure be spoiled but that wasn't the case.

                                      Comment


                                      • #20
                                        Freedom (and stuff) without responsibilty, spoils.
                                        Responsibility without freedom frustrates and damages.
                                        Proper amounts of both makes kids soar

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