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How tight is too tight - tall boots

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  • How tight is too tight - tall boots

    Sorry to put another tall boot thread on here, but hoping to avoid getting the wrong size boot!

    Situation: there is a pair of Ariat Challenges (tall/regular) at the tack store that I surprised myself by actually getting on this past weekend (over breeches). I walked around quite a bit in them and am starting to get a sense of how they'll break in. They were not horribly hard to get on - they have zippers and there weren't big bulges or anything pulling on the zippers - but they were TIGHT. I sat in a saddle with stirrups on it to get a sense of how the talls would work...and I could feel the pulse in my legs pounding.

    So...is that too tight?

    Or is that good? As they will stretch?

    Or better to go up a size? The fit was just so nice in the regular calf - I hate to go to fulls - but I don't want to regret this later. (Although I do fully realize that I will probably bust these zippers at least once in the first year of ownership and completely plan on sending them to Ariat to have the good YKK zippers installed on them when it happens.)

    I can put my current boots on without even needing boot pulls they are so big - so I don't even really know what proper fitting boots are supposed to feel like.

    Thanks!

  • #2
    I hate that throbbing in my legs from too tight boots...hate it! With zippers you do run a chance of them breaking and probably at the most inopportune time like at a show. Personally, I'd try the next larger size or a different brand of boot. I don't like to ride in pain

    Comment


    • #3
      Okay this is an embarrassing story, but too good not to share here -

      Tall boots are "too tight" when a few moments after you (by some miracle) get them on your calf begins to ache & your toes fall asleep, and when you try to get it off (no zipper), the boot jack can't budge it, and you start to panic.

      Panic seems to make your trapped calf seem to swell before your eyes and you realize you are alone, and in so much pain & panic by then, you can't even cut the boot off without gouging your flesh. So as the pain increases in waves you are pondering making the stupidest 911 call in history or facing attempting a drive to the emergency room to have it cut off before your foot dies and turns gangrenous, until at the last minute you sort through all your friends and think of one that would forgive you for driving over at 10 pm in pajamas and one tall boot (and a friend who won't remind you of your moronic act every day for the next ten years!)

      And you really know it was too tight when it takes her, her burly husband, and teenage son 5 minutes of desperate tugging before you are boot free, and 5 more minutes of massage before feeling begins to flow back into your toes.





      So, if you didn't feel in danger of making it 911 call, it *might* not have been too tight.

      But obviously you shouldn't listen to me on this issue.

      Sheepishly,
      Arcadien

      Comment


      • #4
        I personally feel there's no such thing as too tight. You want them skin tight, just not killing you. If you can get them on & zip them up they're already a LOT looser than what some people start with. I have friends who went through similar experiences as the above poster, and after finally getting the boots peeled off took them to be stretched for a few days (the footwear equivalent of sending your bad horse to "the cowboys") and lived happily ever after.
        Really. They'll stretch a lot. A lotalot. From your description I'd be worried that by the time they finish stretching they might even be too big. If you can even leave them on for two minutes without losing feeling in your feet & legs, I would NOT go up a size.

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        • #5
          How long did you walk around in them?

          I just bought a pair of ariat tall boots and they are a touch too tight (I also feel my legs pulsing). It's a full calf. I tried the wide calf and it was just wayyy too big (looked ridiculous) so, full it was. However, I put the boots on while I was grooming/bathing my horse, and after a few hours the pulsing went away. I assume they will continue to break in and be totally fine. I'd rather have them too tight than too wide...you can always stretch them!
          Originally posted by barka.lounger
          u get big old crop and bust that nags ass the next time it even slow down.

          we see u in gp ring in no time.

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          • #6
            Back to admit I agree with the posters who said, you want them "almost too tight" to begin with - guess that's partly why I ended up in the predicament I did, I was trying for as tight as I could bear (in this case they were too tall too, so no point to stretching them).

            My best boots were so tight I could only wear knee high nylons under them, and sometimes my calves ached. But after that first season they stretched on their own and they were my best fitting boots for 20 years.

            Just have someone who can help lined up ahead of time before you try to pull on those "almost too tight" boots, to avoid my hilarious but at the time scary (and painful!) predicament!

            Arcadien

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            • #7
              that wasn't the bridlespur hs was it?

              ya i agree with everyone else. def. would not go up a size.

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              • #8
                Arcadian - you haven't ever had too tight boots, eh?
                A proud friend of bar.ka.

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                • #9
                  I wouldn't go up a size. They should feel almost too tight, but they will relax over time and mold to your feet and calves. I have an older pair of Ariat Challenges that are around 5 years old and they have stretched out a bit, but that is because the zippers were redone. They broke in lovely when they were new though.

                  Arcadien:
                  www.justworldinternational.org

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                  • #10
                    If they are a bit too tight, just try to get them on and then take them to the shower or wash stall. hose them down with warm or hot water. get them nice and wet. and then wear them until they are dry! this is the best way to break in boots especially if they are a bit too tight.
                    the tack shop that i bought my boots at told me this. one calf was a bit tight. the one that i had torn my ACL and had to do tons of rehab and build muscles. i was in the regular calf ariats but the wide calf looked horrible! the guy selling the boots really had to struggle to get the right calf zipped up. but i did what he said. get the really wet and now they fit like a glove. and i didnt even have to worry about breaking them in. they were comfy the first time i wore them on a horse.

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                    • #11
                      I'd stay with those ones. My semi-customs wouldn't zip for months if I tried to put them on after 10 AM since my legs started to swell. Now they fit like a glove.

                      You obviously don't want them to cut off the circulation to your feet, but with that feeling that you described, you should be able to break them in pretty easily. Just don't try to wear them for the first time at a show! Wear them bathing, etc. for a while first. In fact, my old boss at a tack shop told girls to go wear there boots in the hottest weather imaginable to break them in. The heat on the horse will loosen the boots up so they fit great.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        When my custom boots came in, it took 30 minutes for the tack shop owner and I to get them on and when they did, they hurt quite a bit. I didn't lose feeling in my toes but I thought my calf was going to implode. I was worried that they were too tight and she was worried that they weren't tight enough. If they don't hurt at first, they are going to break in to be too big.

                        We horse people really are crazy!
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                        • #13
                          After having to be the one wielding scissors to cut boots off of someone else who was crying - be very careful buying boots that might be a bit tight. Especially if there's a small chance that you might gain weight or pick up running, tennis or dancing.

                          If it's only slightly uncomfortable, they make stretch spray but I don't know how great that works. You do have to worry with the zippers though that the zippers might break.

                          Good luck! Breaking in new boots is so very unfun.
                          HorseStableReview.com - Tell others what you know! Post your barn or review today.

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                          • #14
                            I definitely wouldn't go up a size.. My first pair of tall boots I bought too loose (painful at the time but not quite painful enough I guess ) and after a season they were too big and they had also dropped too much.

                            My replacement pair are zips and they took myself and two other people at the tack shop to get on, and when I was breaking them in I had purple spots (not quite bruises as they faded after a couple hours) on my ankles but in the end after they broke in they fit great!
                            Faibel Farms Custom Fly Bonnets
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                            • Original Poster

                              #15
                              [QUOTE
                              We horse people really are crazy![/QUOTE]

                              LOL. Isn't that the truth?!!

                              Comment


                              • #16
                                Originally posted by Arcadien View Post
                                Okay this is an embarrassing story, but too good not to share here -

                                Tall boots are "too tight" when a few moments after you (by some miracle) get them on your calf begins to ache & your toes fall asleep, and when you try to get it off (no zipper), the boot jack can't budge it, and you start to panic.

                                Panic seems to make your trapped calf seem to swell before your eyes and you realize you are alone, and in so much pain & panic by then, you can't even cut the boot off without gouging your flesh. So as the pain increases in waves you are pondering making the stupidest 911 call in history or facing attempting a drive to the emergency room to have it cut off before your foot dies and turns gangrenous, until at the last minute you sort through all your friends and think of one that would forgive you for driving over at 10 pm in pajamas and one tall boot (and a friend who won't remind you of your moronic act every day for the next ten years!)

                                And you really know it was too tight when it takes her, her burly husband, and teenage son 5 minutes of desperate tugging before you are boot free, and 5 more minutes of massage before feeling begins to flow back into your toes.





                                So, if you didn't feel in danger of making it 911 call, it *might* not have been too tight.

                                But obviously you shouldn't listen to me on this issue.

                                Sheepishly,
                                Arcadien
                                I feel your pain the exact thing happened to me and my claustrophobia set in. I was a blubbering fool and had a giggling teenage daughter enjoying witnessing my panic attack. Now zippers are a MUST for any tall boot fashion be dammed.
                                ___._/> I don't suffer from insanity.. I enjoy every
                                ____/ minute of it! Member stick horse art lovers
                                ';;;;;;; clique
                                //__\\<-- Don't feed the llama!

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                                • #17
                                  Originally posted by Arcadien View Post
                                  Okay this is an embarrassing story, but too good not to share here -

                                  Tall boots are "too tight" when a few moments after you (by some miracle) get them on your calf begins to ache & your toes fall asleep, and when you try to get it off (no zipper), the boot jack can't budge it, and you start to panic.

                                  Panic seems to make your trapped calf seem to swell before your eyes and you realize you are alone, and in so much pain & panic by then, you can't even cut the boot off without gouging your flesh. So as the pain increases in waves you are pondering making the stupidest 911 call in history or facing attempting a drive to the emergency room to have it cut off before your foot dies and turns gangrenous, until at the last minute you sort through all your friends and think of one that would forgive you for driving over at 10 pm in pajamas and one tall boot (and a friend who won't remind you of your moronic act every day for the next ten years!)


                                  And you really know it was too tight when it takes her, her burly husband, and teenage son 5 minutes of desperate tugging before you are boot free, and 5 more minutes of massage before feeling begins to flow back into your toes.





                                  So, if you didn't feel in danger of making it 911 call, it *might* not have been too tight.

                                  But obviously you shouldn't listen to me on this issue.

                                  Sheepishly,
                                  Arcadien
                                  This is freaking priceless!!!! I laughed (with you, not at you) all the way through it
                                  Save a life...be an organ donor! Visit www.Transplantbuddies.org

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                                  • #18
                                    Originally posted by Arcadien View Post
                                    My best boots were so tight I could only wear knee high nylons under them, and sometimes my calves ached. But after that first season they stretched on their own and they were my best fitting boots for 20 years.


                                    Arcadien
                                    I am so old school, If you could fit anything in them except nylon knee highs and a few squirts of show sheen they were way too big... You always put your boots on in the morning as soon as you got up and dressed, as you could never do it later when your legs and feet are bigger...

                                    Taking your boots off was always a barn project. End of show everyone sat down and helped pull each others boots off.
                                    Fullcirclefarmsc.com

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                                    • #19
                                      My motto has always been-if you can feel your feet after they have been on for a while, they are too loose.

                                      Seriously though, they will stretch. There is nothing worse than too loose tall boots. If you can get them zipped, you are fine. No pain, no gain!

                                      I used to have my brother pull my boots off for me back in the day because he was the only person strong enough to get them off of me.

                                      Comment


                                      • #20
                                        Originally posted by Hunter Mom View Post
                                        Arcadian - you haven't ever had too tight boots, eh?
                                        What? Nah me, never!

                                        (Aw sheesh, they looked sooooo elegant, after a couple glasses of wine, I was so sure I could fit in them!!!)

                                        (Thank heavens for friends and that Dover has a nice return policy <grin>)

                                        Arcadien

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