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Critique please?

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  • Critique please?

    I have been doing dressage lessons with this horse through the winter and just starting to bring him back to jumping. He's been doing 2'3 to 2'9 little courses at home with the occassional 3'6 vertical thown in. He hasn't done any serious jumping since last August.

    Comments on both of us would be appreciated.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Nv7nBVPi49Q

    As a side note, in watching the videos from the lower fences I was really consistent with my automatic release until the jump got a little bigger, then I started doing something in between an auto release and crest release. I guess I just need more practice or mental discipline.
    Stoneybrook Farm Afton TN

  • #2
    I think you and your horse look great. All your videos usually do.

    It is a short video, so the only thing I really see is that you tend to drop your eyes on occasion.

    There might be a little stiffness in your upper body after the jump, but it might also just be the footage.

    Lovely horse, lovely rider.
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    "I know nothing with any certainty, but the sight of stars makes me dream." --Vincent Van Gogh

    Comment

    • Original Poster

      #3
      I think the dressage lessons are really helping with my stiffness. I think I tend to just pose and freeze up. I used to be too relaxed of a rider, now I think I just sort of prop and pose and freeze up, especially on this horse. In the dressage lessons I can't fake it. I have to ride both sides of him all the time and the moment I don't the trainer really gets after me. I can tell it's starting to help a lot in the jumping work.

      I'm having a hard time with getting back to a nice canter immediately after the fence. I want to stay over too long, let him dive on the forehand and drag me around. If there's another fence coming right up I don't do that, or more likely he doesn't do it.
      Stoneybrook Farm Afton TN

      Comment


      • #4
        I like the horse, seems happy and interested in his job. He is bold and nice and square over his fences. I love that after the first X he took a second to check back with what you were saying. His ears came back to you for instant, it was hard to tell from the video whether you clucked or if he was responding to the deeper seat you took, either way I like that he is so engaged, and connected.

        The only negative I have is that when you got to the oxer you seem to ride him a little more. I would like to have seen you just maintain and let him come out himself. I think he would get a little rounder and be more expressive. He has the scope and is just fooling around over that height, and he was so trained in on the fence he had it all figured out already.

        Your body, your hands, your legs, pretty much textbook; perhaps just relax a bit and flow with the horse. I always like to take that second or two in the air to just enjoy the feeling of jumping that is of course, unless I need to focus on what is next.

        I am not sure what you mean about the auto-release, you do not have very long arms so I would imagine it is hard to drop your hands down much more without exaggerating it, but when I slowed it down there was a perfectly straight line all the way down your arms, and straight to the bit with nice light contact, an auto in my book any day.

        I would love to see a nice little course of you two at 4', I think we would really start to see his ability.

        Comment

        • Original Poster

          #5
          Thanks for the feedback Hauwse. I really appreciate it. Hopefully by June we'll be tooling around a 4' course at home.

          I've been thinking a lot about how I rode to the oxer and how I felt like I really had to close my leg to get him there. Maybe I was riding it aggressively since this was our first decent sized jump in so long? But you mention his ears flicking back at me, perhaps I was distracting him a little by not just letting the gymnastic work for me?
          Stoneybrook Farm Afton TN

          Comment


          • #6
            I do the same thing, TR, and I can see it in your riding to the oxer. I think it is distracting to them, which was already mentioned, but it's a hard habit to break. It would be interesting to see how it was if you just left him alone.

            Thank goodness for dressage lessons, huh? They've helped me sooooo much, too!
            "IT'S NOT THE MOUNTAIN WE CONQUER, BUT OURSELVES." SIR EDMUND HILLARYMember of the "Someone Special To Me Serves In The Military" Clique

            Comment


            • #7
              It is a quick video, you are obviously well school and educated rider. Here are few things I see...

              I feel your stirrup is 1-1/2 holes too long, your knee angle is too open (>110 degrees) but your lower leg is stable and underneath you (perpendicular to the ground) but it is causing you to jump ahead and then fall back to early, hitting the back of your saddle/his back too early. Your lower back also rounds as you land, I think most of this will correct itself with adjusting your stirrup length.

              Slightly difficult to see exactly your release as the video is so quick, but falls more into a short crest release IMHO, as even in slow motion, I get a break in the line, but feel "this" release worked for you and your horse here.

              This horse seems like a knee, snappy jumper, quick with his legs, pulls his knees, a little lazy below (better over oxer) and a slight twist to the left. He does get a little behind the bit on the landing side, you mention about getting him back after the jump, just be sure not to rush this to much, I would prefer to let him land, canter up to the bridle a bit, then adjust him back, as he becomes more balanced, you can ask for this sooner, and sooner.

              Have fun with him!
              www.brydellefarm.com ....developing riders, NOT passengers!
              Member of LNHorsemanshipT & Proud of It Clique
              "What gets me up every morning is realizing how much more there is still to learn." -GHM

              Comment


              • #8
                He looks like so much fun!! I would really try to let the gymnastic work for you - he's clever enough to get you out of trouble if he shouldn't step right to that next fence. But I bet he just does. That feeling of needing to ride to it is a tough one to lose. Try just getting into the gymnastic and letting him figure it out. I think you will be pleasantly surprised.

                I meant to say what an awful, unattractive, dangerous horse. You must send him to me to hide for you. Hi to Stewie/Comet.

                Comment


                • #9
                  You look great as always. Havoline on the other hand, looks AWFUL! You MUST send him to me RIGHT away so I can save him!!
                  "If you are nervous you arent focused-if you are focused, there is no room for nerves!"

                  Comment

                  • Original Poster

                    #10
                    Originally posted by Brydelle Farm View Post
                    It is a quick video, you are obviously well school and educated rider. Here are few things I see...

                    I feel your stirrup is 1-1/2 holes too long, your knee angle is too open (>110 degrees) but your lower leg is stable and underneath you (perpendicular to the ground) but it is causing you to jump ahead and then fall back to early, hitting the back of your saddle/his back too early. Your lower back also rounds as you land, I think most of this will correct itself with adjusting your stirrup length.

                    ...
                    Have fun with him!
                    Thanks for the input Brydelle. I was able to ride another horse with a shorter stirrup the same day in this same saddle, but it's my old close contact saddle as my Butet doesn't fit my horses any more. I have absolutely no knee roll or any kind of support from the saddle any longer. It's almost like riding bareback. Crazy. I am looking into a new saddle but in the mean time, this old Blue Ribbon Prize must suffice. I started a hole shorter but just couldn't do it on this horse. Maybe in the next few rides I'll get a better feel in a shorter stirrup with this saddle.

                    Originally posted by coriander View Post
                    He looks like so much fun!! I would really try to let the gymnastic work for you - he's clever enough to get you out of trouble if he shouldn't step right to that next fence. But I bet he just does. That feeling of needing to ride to it is a tough one to lose. Try just getting into the gymnastic and letting him figure it out. I think you will be pleasantly surprised.

                    I meant to say what an awful, unattractive, dangerous horse. You must send him to me to hide for you. Hi to Stewie/Comet.
                    I'll give it a shot the next time I get a chance to jump him like that. Maybe next weekend. I could have my mother-in-law set jumps for me. That would be a hoot.

                    I'll tell Comet you said hello! He's already way bigger then when he was born just a wee 10 days ago!

                    Originally posted by bhrunner06 View Post
                    You look great as always. Havoline on the other hand, looks AWFUL! You MUST send him to me RIGHT away so I can save him!!
                    Ahhh, you don't want that old broken down barefooted son-of-a-gun. He's of no value to anyone but me, like an old car, or your favorite old pair of jeans, or some old Burkinstock sandals.....
                    Last edited by tidy rabbit; Apr. 13, 2009, 10:41 PM.
                    Stoneybrook Farm Afton TN

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      You look great...and you know I love Havoline. However....I can only continue to cheer you on if you immediately surrender Aero to me and save him from a life of envying Havoline. It's just not fair to have them competing against each other for your affections. Aero needs some good mexican food and has a taste for hot summers. He needs some Texas love. I just know it!!! Seriously - you look great. Just relax and let the gymnastic work for you. And maybe we honestly will meet in Kentucky sometime this year .
                      http://good-times.webshots.com/album/557433725gtOAuC

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        I have no critique, except I am SUPER jealous of your lower leg! oh and I would love to have your horse Commander Aero

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          No critique here either... I think you and Hav look great. Can't wait to "play" with him.

                          And for those of you that say you want Aero? Hands off, he's mine. Just ask TR... I have first dibs!

                          Comment

                          • Original Poster

                            #14
                            Haha. Who ever writes the check for him has first dibs. Sorry LSM1212, that's the way it must be. BUT you'll get to play with him & Hav when you come to visit.

                            MissIndependence, perhaps this year will be the year. Let me know when you're coming and I'll try to get down there with Aero to do a little class and let you ride him too. He's as much fun as he is cute!
                            Stoneybrook Farm Afton TN

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Hands off the Havers, he's mine! he tells me so. I have the photographic evidence to prove his longing to be in my barn. But Miss Independence, we're not that far apart, we can share! LOL!

                              Comment


                              • #16
                                Originally posted by tidy rabbit View Post
                                Thanks for the feedback Hauwse. I really appreciate it. Hopefully by June we'll be tooling around a 4' course at home.

                                I've been thinking a lot about how I rode to the oxer and how I felt like I really had to close my leg to get him there. Maybe I was riding it aggressively since this was our first decent sized jump in so long? But you mention his ears flicking back at me, perhaps I was distracting him a little by not just letting the gymnastic work for me?
                                I do not think you were distracting him I just mentioned it because it is a good sign that he is engaged in the conversation. You said something and he paid attention. However you are right about letting the gymnastics work for you. Support and let him figure it out. An exercise like that is supposed to teach a horse pace and impulsion. He has to figure out the impulsion he needs to jump that fence efficiently. Once he figures that out he will drop to his hind end and start to use his neck and shoulder as well he can. Once he understands the feeling again he will be back up to speed.

                                Comment


                                • #17
                                  Something the others didn't mention but that I saw in the short video is that you seemed to use your seat to propel your horse, rather than your lower leg. The result is that you appear to be sitting (snapping up) up a little fast after the jump, and then getting a little behind the horse to drive him through the gymnastic. When the jumps go up, that can cause the horse to not have enough room in front of the jump to get front legs up, and might cause a rail behind because you are sitting down so fast.

                                  Think about using your lower leg more, and less motion with your shoulders, seat and upper body -- just smooth things out so that you are quieter in the tack. You should be just as strong and effective this way - with a stronger lower leg, you'll have more stability and feel like you have more options for your release.

                                  Also, the crest release is fine - with a good jumping horse, the mane is there to grab so that you can stay out of his way!

                                  Comment


                                  • #18
                                    Ditto Brydelles post about coming back into the tack too early- especially landing from the crossbar, you're already in the backseat. Similarly, coming back too early from the oxer is probably leading to the struggle to regain balance at the canter. He's got to land from the jump and rebalance from that first, then you two can talk about the canter. Right now I see a combination of trying to drive him forward over the crossbar, and then getting a little anticipatory about the upcoming canter on the backside of the oxer.

                                    First thing I would fix is any sluggishness over the crossbar- if you have any sense you're not going to make the stride to the much larger oxer you'll always find your butt in the tack. I might use 3-4 trot poles in to build the impulsion for you, then focus on staying still in that exact two-point throughout the entire combination, never letting seat touch tack, leg on, him jumping up to you to close the angle. Land from the oxer and be obnoxious about following him down, leave your hands on the neck for 2 or 3 strides and see if he hasn't already found that canter you've been looking for.

                                    Give yourself plenty of room to the end of the ring so you're not worried about any upcoming turns. She may be right about the stirrup length too. Otherwise you look great, as always wouldn't worry too much about this or that release right now, just keep out of his way.

                                    (Got your email! We're going to get together this summer and start building some real media for him. If he's still around in August you should do our KY Nat'l campaign Are you going to Ky Spring?)
                                    EHJ | FB | #140 | watch | #insta

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