• Welcome to the Chronicle Forums.
    Please complete your profile. The forums and the rest of www.chronofhorse.com has single sign-in, so your log in information for one will automatically work for the other. Disclaimer: The opinions expressed here are the views of the individual and do not necessarily reflect the views and opinions of The Chronicle of the Horse.

Announcement

Collapse

Forum rules and no-advertising policy

As a participant on this forum, it is your responsibility to know and follow our rules. Please read this message in its entirety.

Board Rules

1. You’re responsible for what you say.
As outlined in Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act, The Chronicle of the Horse and its affiliates, as well Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd., the developers of vBulletin, are not legally responsible for statements made in the forums.

This is a public forum viewed by a wide spectrum of people, so please be mindful of what you say and who might be reading it—details of personal disputes are likely better handled privately. While posters are legally responsible for their statements, the moderators may in their discretion remove or edit posts that violate these rules. Users have the ability to modify or delete their own messages after posting, but administrators generally will not delete posts, threads or accounts upon request.

Outright inflammatory, vulgar, harassing, malicious or otherwise inappropriate statements and criminal charges unsubstantiated by a reputable news source or legal documentation will not be tolerated and will be dealt with at the discretion of the moderators.

2. Conversations in horse-related forums should be horse-related.
The forums are a wonderful source of information and support for members of the horse community. While it’s understandably tempting to share information or search for input on other topics upon which members might have a similar level of knowledge, members must maintain the focus on horses.

3. Keep conversations productive, on topic and civil.
Discussion and disagreement are inevitable and encouraged; personal insults, diatribes and sniping comments are unproductive and unacceptable. Whether a subject is light-hearted or serious, keep posts focused on the current topic and of general interest to other participants of that thread. Utilize the private message feature or personal email where appropriate to address side topics or personal issues not related to the topic at large.

4. No advertising in the discussion forums.
Posts in the discussion forums directly or indirectly advertising horses, jobs, items or services for sale or wanted will be removed at the discretion of the moderators. Use of the private messaging feature or email addresses obtained through users’ profiles for unsolicited advertising is not permitted.

Company representatives may participate in discussions and answer questions about their products or services, or suggest their products on recent threads if they fulfill the criteria of a query. False "testimonials" provided by company affiliates posing as general consumers are not appropriate, and self-promotion of sales, ad campaigns, etc. through the discussion forums is not allowed.

Paid advertising is available on our classifieds site and through the purchase of banner ads. The tightly monitored Giveaways forum permits free listings of genuinely free horses and items available or wanted (on a limited basis). Items offered for trade are not allowed.

Advertising Policy Specifics
When in doubt of whether something you want to post constitutes advertising, please contact a moderator privately in advance for further clarification. Refer to the following points for general guidelines:

Horses – Only general discussion about the buying, leasing, selling and pricing of horses is permitted. If the post contains, or links to, the type of specific information typically found in a sales or wanted ad, and it’s related to a horse for sale, regardless of who’s selling it, it doesn’t belong in the discussion forums.

Stallions – Board members may ask for suggestions on breeding stallion recommendations. Stallion owners may reply to such queries by suggesting their own stallions, only if their horse fits the specific criteria of the original poster. Excessive promotion of a stallion by its owner or related parties is not permitted and will be addressed at the discretion of the moderators.

Services – Members may use the forums to ask for general recommendations of trainers, barns, shippers, farriers, etc., and other members may answer those requests by suggesting themselves or their company, if their services fulfill the specific criteria of the original post. Members may not solicit other members for business if it is not in response to a direct, genuine query.

Products – While members may ask for general opinions and suggestions on equipment, trailers, trucks, etc., they may not list the specific attributes for which they are in the market, as such posts serve as wanted ads.

Event Announcements – Members may post one notification of an upcoming event that may be of interest to fellow members, if the original poster does not benefit financially from the event. Such threads may not be “bumped” excessively. Premium members may post their own notices in the Event Announcements forum.

Charities/Rescues – Announcements for charitable or fundraising events can only be made for 501(c)(3) tax-exempt organizations. Special exceptions may be made, at the moderators’ discretion and direction, for board-related events or fundraising activities in extraordinary circumstances.

Occasional posts regarding horses available for adoption through IRS-registered horse rescue or placement programs are permitted in the appropriate forums, but these threads may be limited at the discretion of the moderators. Individuals may not advertise or make announcements for horses in need of rescue, placement or adoption unless the horse is available through a recognized rescue or placement agency or government-run entity or the thread fits the criteria for and is located in the Giveaways forum.

5. Do not post copyrighted photographs unless you have purchased that photo and have permission to do so.

6. Respect other members.
As members are often passionate about their beliefs and intentions can easily be misinterpreted in this type of environment, try to explore or resolve the inevitable disagreements that arise in the course of threads calmly and rationally.

If you see a post that you feel violates the rules of the board, please click the “alert” button (exclamation point inside of a triangle) in the bottom left corner of the post, which will alert ONLY the moderators to the post in question. They will then take whatever action, or no action, as deemed appropriate for the situation at their discretion. Do not air grievances regarding other posters or the moderators in the discussion forums.

Please be advised that adding another user to your “Ignore” list via your User Control Panel can be a useful tactic, which blocks posts and private messages by members whose commentary you’d rather avoid reading.

7. We have the right to reproduce statements made in the forums.
The Chronicle of the Horse may copy, quote, link to or otherwise reproduce posts, or portions of posts, in print or online for advertising or editorial purposes, if attributed to their original authors, and by posting in this forum, you hereby grant to The Chronicle of the Horse a perpetual, non-exclusive license under copyright and other rights, to do so.

8. We reserve the right to enforce and amend the rules.
The moderators may delete, edit, move or close any post or thread at any time, or refrain from doing any of the foregoing, in their discretion, and may suspend or revoke a user’s membership privileges at any time to maintain adherence to the rules and the general spirit of the forum. These rules may be amended at any time to address the current needs of the board.

Please see our full Terms of Service and Privacy Policy for more information.

Thanks for being a part of the COTH forums!

(Revised 1/26/16)
See more
See less

International Jumper Futurity 4 year olds?

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • International Jumper Futurity 4 year olds?

    I was just curious what the program is for four year olds nominated to the futurity.

    The young jumper website is all screwy as is the IJF and it doesn't give any current information.

    What shows offer jumper stuff for the nominated 4 year olds?

    How high is it and what are they asked to do?

    I have a colt that is nominated to the hunter futurity. I thought on the chance he may be better suited to be a jumper type that I could show him in the young jumper stuff.

    I am just curious when and where these classes are held

  • #2
    The jumps are about 3'3" at the finals. Most of the professionals only do about 3 or 4 shows with their horses in the 4 year old year, they really shouldn't be jumping much at that age.

    Comment


    • #3
      If you plan to keep your colt for the length of his career, I wouldn't show him in a futurity, let alone a jumper one.

      You would be cutting physical and mental corners that may come to bite you BAD later... or not so later.

      JMHO.... but X-ray his knees when he's just 3 and see if they are closed enough for a year of work. Also, look up past futurity winners. If these horses are going strong in their teens, then I'm wrong. If they seem to have disappeared by then, pay attention.
      The armchair saddler
      Politically Pro-Cat

      Comment

      • Original Poster

        #4
        I know as a 4 year old it is mostly flat and gymnastics? That is what I have heard.

        I don't need the lecture that it is too young and blah blah. I get it. If I feel he can do it he will, if not then he won't. My decision period.

        I am asking what shows offer these classes, what the classes are like and if there are classes on the west coast for the 4 year olds.

        The website is all over the place and there is no updated information.

        My colts stallion has numerous young horse showing and winning in these classes in the mid-west, so I am just curious what they are all about and where they are held at!

        Comment


        • #5
          IIRC, the four year old futurity is only open to IJF nominated horses - they will automatically send you an entry form a few months prior (there are three total shows for the 4 year olds.)

          From this year's program info:

          2009 International Jumper Futurity
          Program Guidelines

          Three competitions will be held each year. Every IJF nominated 4 year old horse is eligible for entry in one competition. Each event will be held in conjunction with a major jumper show. Every effort will be made to schedule the IJF competitions to assure the greatest possible exposure for these horses.

          Every IJF nominated horse will also be eligible to compete in all Young Jumper Championship competitions with no additional nomination fees required.

          Competition Entries and Drug Testing
          IJF entry forms will be mailed to all 4 year old owners approximately 2 months prior to the competitions. All entrants must contact the horse show hosting the IJF event for stabling and drug forms prior to the show's closing dates. The IJF may conduct drug testing for forbidden substances in conjunction with, or in accordance to USEF testing.
          Four Year Old Program-open only to IJF Nominated 4 year olds.
          • To be eligible to compete, 4 year olds must never have entered or competed in any jumper event with fences exceeding 3'9" in height.
          • A horse's participation in hunter events will not effect his/her eligibility.
          • Each horse entered in this year’s competition who completes both rounds will receive $1000. Trophies and additional prize money will be given for three categories. Breeders awards of $200 will be given to each stallion nominator.
          The original young horse nominators will receive $100.
          • Participating in the IJF events will not, in itself, jeopardize a horse's First Year Green eligibility.

          FWIW, my current horse did some of the young jumper stuff as a 5 year old. He is now 11 and has never had any "ill effects" from doing so.
          **********
          We move pretty fast for some rabid garden snails.
          -PaulaEdwina

          Comment

          • Original Poster

            #6
            Thank you.

            that was what I was wondering. So it sounds like they have a east, midwest and west coast show for the 4 year olds each year.

            I also have read that they have 3 or 4 categories they can win under in the 4 year olds. Like most potential, best attitude, most consistent? Something like that.

            Comment


            • #7
              Getting a young horse ready for the jumper futurity does not necessarily require a lot of wear and tear. I wouldn't dismiss this option out of hand for a young horse. If you have efficient, competent preparation with a professional or talented amateur, it can work just fine. I've seen multiple IJF horses prepared without a lot of time or too much work on young joints. If you have one that's not coming along, you don't do it. But many progress just fine with light, focused work. Done correctly, it can be a very positive experience and put the horse in a good spot for entering more serious work and the young jumper classes as 5 year olds.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by jr View Post
                Getting a young horse ready for the jumper futurity does not necessarily require a lot of wear and tear. I wouldn't dismiss this option out of hand for a young horse. If you have efficient, competent preparation with a professional or talented amateur, it can work just fine. I've seen multiple IJF horses prepared without a lot of time or too much work on young joints. If you have one that's not coming along, you don't do it. But many progress just fine with light, focused work. Done correctly, it can be a very positive experience and put the horse in a good spot for entering more serious work and the young jumper classes as 5 year olds.
                define 'many progress just fine' - does that mean they don't fritz out and go lame immediately? i'm not trying to pick a fight, i am just always intrigued by people saying 'you see how they do' - because how they will do is remain sound - until the day they don't. and i can't imagine that starting at four doesn't speed up that inevitable process.
                **************
                http://img.skitch.com/20100717-q91i7...u2ub8k6b15.jpg

                Comment

                • Original Poster

                  #9
                  she probably means mentality wise. Some young horses are slower to learn and develop. Those are the types that get stressed and don't do well with work at an early age.

                  Some four year old progress easily into flat and light jumping and are able to compete a little. Some don't.

                  Does anyone know the actual courses/tests they ask at the 3 4 yr old shows?

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by KristieBee View Post
                    define 'many progress just fine' - does that mean they don't fritz out and go lame immediately? i'm not trying to pick a fight, i am just always intrigued by people saying 'you see how they do' - because how they will do is remain sound - until the day they don't. and i can't imagine that starting at four doesn't speed up that inevitable process.
                    Properly managed horses don't "inevitably" go lame.

                    Show jumpers are athletes and like any athletes, they can suffer injuries and illnesses. However, with a proper conditioning and training program, there is a lot that can be done to prevent problems with appropriate work and management.

                    A strong, fit horse is much less likely to break down in regular work; look at the european programs as an example. Their horses are routinely worked twice a day, and they are kept in terrific physical condition. Compare that to the horse owned by the typical "weekend warrior" that pulls the horse out of the pasture once a week on Saturday for a hard ride - basically asking for an injury.

                    I generally start my horses late in their three year old year, after the vet has evaluated them and determined that they are ready to go to work (knees closed, etc.) They do light flat work to start out and begin learning their jobs. They are normally jumping around simple 3' courses in their four year old year. I have yet to have one that has had a problem with this approach, and the oldest is over 20 now. They are carefully managed and have plenty of downtime interspersed in their schedules, but they all work for a living and have a good solid work ethic installed early.

                    Everyone has to make their own decisions about what is best for their individual animals, but to suggest that the Futurity program is some kind of passport to early unsoundness makes no sense to me. YMMV.
                    **********
                    We move pretty fast for some rabid garden snails.
                    -PaulaEdwina

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Sorry, but "some can, some can't" is the best anwer and there is no set in stone formula for colts or horses at any age.

                      BTW, the Europeans routinely evaluate youngsters over very simple courses up to around 4' before deciding whether to export them or keep them to compete in the home country. Does not seem to hurt most of them. At all.

                      Pounding is what hurts them and influences future soundness and qualified trainers know how to get the job done without pounding them or frying their brains. Young and in light work does not automatically equal pounding.
                      When opportunity knocks it's wearing overalls and looks like work.

                      The horse world. Two people. Three opinions.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Lucassb View Post
                        Properly managed horses don't "inevitably" go lame.

                        Show jumpers are athletes and like any athletes, they can suffer injuries and illnesses. However, with a proper conditioning and training program, there is a lot that can be done to prevent problems with appropriate work and management.

                        A strong, fit horse is much less likely to break down in regular work; look at the european programs as an example. Their horses are routinely worked twice a day, and they are kept in terrific physical condition. Compare that to the horse owned by the typical "weekend warrior" that pulls the horse out of the pasture once a week on Saturday for a hard ride - basically asking for an injury.

                        I generally start my horses late in their three year old year, after the vet has evaluated them and determined that they are ready to go to work (knees closed, etc.) They do light flat work to start out and begin learning their jobs. They are normally jumping around simple 3' courses in their four year old year. I have yet to have one that has had a problem with this approach, and the oldest is over 20 now. They are carefully managed and have plenty of downtime interspersed in their schedules, but they all work for a living and have a good solid work ethic installed early.

                        Everyone has to make their own decisions about what is best for their individual animals, but to suggest that the Futurity program is some kind of passport to early unsoundness makes no sense to me. YMMV.
                        again, not baiting or looking for a fight, genuinely curious, because i'm probably overly cautious but because i plan to own my imported german warmblood (got him at five years old from germany) for his entire lifetime, i'm perhaps unduly preoccupied with keeping him sound. i want to be able to look him in the eye at 30 years old god willing and know i did my best by him.

                        so the 20 year old of which you speak...or any of your horses that you've had for their entire careers...do they get hock injections? and when did they start needing them? because when i say 'go lame' that's part of what i consider going lame - needing injections at an early age to keep going soundly. a mare at my old trainers who needed hock injections at the age of 6 comes to mind. i found that preposterous. and yet people shrugged it off as a natural consequence of being an athlete! again call me conservative but these are the things i wish to avoid if possible.

                        thanks very much and please know i'm trying to learn more, not be an instigator.
                        **************
                        http://img.skitch.com/20100717-q91i7...u2ub8k6b15.jpg

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Maintaining joints and keeping a 20 year old comfortable after 15 years of giving everything they have in the competition arena is not treating a lame horse in an animal designed for about a mid 20s life span. You may hear of alot of them living longer but the fact is they are senior, physically, at about 20 and the majority do not make it much past that point. Those famous names that do continue to compete at upper levels have a retinue of health care pros in their camp-and, yeah, they get some help with the old joints.

                          I hate to tell you this but you can circle them in bubble wrap and wait until they are 10 to try a lead change and still have the joints start to wear in mid teens. Or have them get a suspensory rolling in a field. Plus, you still will be lucky if it hits 30 and is useable much past 20.
                          When opportunity knocks it's wearing overalls and looks like work.

                          The horse world. Two people. Three opinions.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Lucassb View Post
                            Each horse entered in this year’s competition who completes both rounds will receive $1000.
                            Is this if you horse just gets around the course in both rounds, or if they go clear in both rounds? I'm thinking of taking my 4 year old to the Midwest competition if he is ready by then (at Traders Point in August), and I'm not too sure how it all works either.

                            I wish the IJF website would update and give out some more information on the program!

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by KristieBee View Post
                              so the 20 year old of which you speak...or any of your horses that you've had for their entire careers...do they get hock injections? and when did they start needing them? because when i say 'go lame' that's part of what i consider going lame - needing injections at an early age to keep going soundly. a mare at my old trainers who needed hock injections at the age of 6 comes to mind. i found that preposterous. and yet people shrugged it off as a natural consequence of being an athlete! again call me conservative but these are the things i wish to avoid if possible. .
                              "Needing" hock injections is often as much about general horse management and barn/trainer perspective as anything else. Some trainers (and vets) just don't know what else to do when a horse isn't quite right. As my vet is fond of saying, hock injections are a great tool, but if you don't know what's causing the symptoms and don't fix the underlying issue you're not going to be doing the horse any service with injections.

                              I had a gelding I took to a BNB as an 8 year old (big name barn, big name shoer, relatively big name trainer). We were showing at 4'3" and getting ready to move up to 4'6". After about 9 months he started showing this really non-specific lameness that 5 vets at the very big name vet clinic in the area couldn't figure out through thousands of dollars of diagnosis procedures. Finally came down to 3 vets and the trainer telling me "it was just time to start injecting the hocks." That was the mentality for any horse above the age of six with lameness issues that couldn't be sorted out by the tools they used.

                              My old shoer took one look at the horse and said, "it's the shoes." Between correcting the shoes and getting body work done on the horse he never needed an injection of any sort to keep him sound. At the age of 16 he's still jumping around 3'6" courses (and could be doing much higher if his rider was interested) with no lameness problems. And FWIW, I started jumping him as an early 4 year old and we were consistently doing 3'6"+ as a mid to late 4yo.

                              Soundness has SO MUCH MORE to do with proper maintenance and conditioning and conformation (some horses are just built to stay sound) throughout the horse's life than whether you jump them over little fences early on. I think the focus on jumping early is just ridiculous. That's not to say that pounding them over jumps over and over again as a youngster is a good idea....just that a well prepared and executed conditioning and training program isn't going to "make" a lame horse down the road.

                              I would say that those 4yo jumpers who are broken down at the age of 7 or 8 had a lot of other missing components in their schedules and lives (poor conformation or poor shoeing or poor conditioning or poor training or some combo of them all).

                              But it's often easier to blame the early jumping. Too bad horses aren't that "simple."
                              __________________________________
                              Flying F Sport Horses
                              Horses in the NW

                              Comment


                              • #16
                                Originally posted by KristieBee View Post
                                again, not baiting or looking for a fight, genuinely curious, because i'm probably overly cautious but because i plan to own my imported german warmblood (got him at five years old from germany) for his entire lifetime, i'm perhaps unduly preoccupied with keeping him sound. i want to be able to look him in the eye at 30 years old god willing and know i did my best by him.

                                so the 20 year old of which you speak...or any of your horses that you've had for their entire careers...do they get hock injections? and when did they start needing them? because when i say 'go lame' that's part of what i consider going lame - needing injections at an early age to keep going soundly. a mare at my old trainers who needed hock injections at the age of 6 comes to mind. i found that preposterous. and yet people shrugged it off as a natural consequence of being an athlete! again call me conservative but these are the things i wish to avoid if possible.

                                thanks very much and please know i'm trying to learn more, not be an instigator.
                                My 21 year old got hock injections one time (and one time only) at around 9 years old IIRC. He never needed another round. Other than that, he's never been on anything more significant than normal oral joint supplements (Cosequin) and is still going strong today. For whatever it's worth, he wasn't lame when I did the injections, just started swinging his hind end over the bigger oxers instead of folding up straight as he had always done in the past. It solved the issue and he went on to show successfully for many years after that. He is now leased out to a jr rider and is teaching her the ropes.

                                That said, I don't consider it "preposterous" to inject a horse if it will make them more comfortable and would never voice that opinion about the treatment of someone else's horse. I rely on my very competent veterinarians to help me assess the proper program for each individual. I've never had one that needed intervention at 6, but there are all sorts of things that can happen which might make such a treatment perfectly reasonable. For instance, there are some horses that fuse a bit early and need some help to maintain their comfort during that process; once the fusion is completed, they are generally perfectly sound afterward and don't need any ongoing treatment. I know several OTTBs that fell into this category and went on to have very long, happy, successful careers.

                                There was a young horse at my barn whose owners were very much opposed to any kind of medical intervention for their young (5-6 year old?) horse about 18 months ago ... a nice young WB gelding who was acting like a brat under saddle. He wasn't even started til he was four and a half, and was brought into work very conservatively with months of light flatwork before they began allowing him to hop over the odd crossrail, so he was not exactly pounded. However, although they backed off the training, tried rest, had the saddle evaluated etc, eventually they found that even flatting him became a challenge.

                                Eventually the trainer talked them into having his backs and hocks evaluated. A combination of chiro & injections made an enormous difference for him and the horse is now happily back to work, doing the children's hunters and going like a rockstar. He was never lame but clearly he had discomfort from work which was resolved by the intervention. He has not needed any other injections or meds since then, and the vet doesn't expect that his career will be compromised in any way.

                                Personally I think the best way to keep a horse sound is to get and keep them fit and strong. We do a lot of conditioning work on our horses and keep them in light work even during their downtimes, so that it is never a big deal or a lot of stress to bring them back to fitness. They do get plenty of variety (hacking out, treadmill work etc) in addition to time in the ring; we don't drill them, but they work hard enough to look like the athletes they are. That helps keep their attitudes happy, too, and they are generally perky and ready to go to work when we pull the tack out.

                                That said, the above is my personal philosophy and the program I have had success with. Every horse is an individual and has to be dealt with as such. There are some with conformational challenges that might warrant a different approach. I don't judge other people's programs or what works for them.
                                **********
                                We move pretty fast for some rabid garden snails.
                                -PaulaEdwina

                                Comment


                                • #17
                                  Thank You!

                                  OP sorry for hijacking your thread but I want to thank everyone for their responses to my questions about what keeps a horse healthy and sound and allaying my fears.

                                  I grew up showing sometimes but trailriding bareback most of the time. This is my first foray, truly, into owning a real athlete and becoming one myself. I just want to do it right, my horses were always sound but they had a very different life. I have a great trainer and a great farrier and would like to be less on edge than I am. I'm not interested in bubble wrapping, I definitely want to have fun with him, but want to make the right decisions as well.

                                  I struggled with soundness issues with this horse for about two years, and it's true, now, that a trainer with a solid dressage background, a good consistent workload, hacking out, body work, and proper shoeing have gotten him in great shape. Having been through what we went through in the beginning though I get very preoccupied with keeping what I have.

                                  My trainer says the same things as you did, PNWJumper and I thank you and she would thank you lol for helping me to relax. LucasB too, thanks.

                                  Much appreciated, all of you!
                                  Best
                                  KB
                                  **************
                                  http://img.skitch.com/20100717-q91i7...u2ub8k6b15.jpg

                                  Comment


                                  • #18
                                    OP--I know Nancy & her clients send some to IJF every year. Ask her any IJF questions & perhaps even what her program to prepare is like. She may have some good pointers. I believe the Midwest is held at Trader's Point & I think they jump around a jumper course in the grass GP field? From the pics I have seen it looks 3'-ish.

                                    I too saw the $1000 part if the horse completes it rounds. That's a nice reward for those participating in the program.
                                    "I'm not crazy...my mother had me tested"

                                    Comment


                                    • #19
                                      Also not spoiling for a fight. I'm so sorry that my early post offended the OP. That was not my intent and I didn't know that bringing up the maturity issue was so wrong.

                                      So, several post later about "what counts as sound" "how long a horse typically 'lasts'", "what contributes to a horse's long-term soundness," one of my original questions still remains. I think someone ought to do a longevity study for horses shown in futurities versus those that are not. Perhaps one already exists?

                                      Again, sorry if this offends, too.
                                      The armchair saddler
                                      Politically Pro-Cat

                                      Comment


                                      • #20
                                        Originally posted by mvp View Post
                                        So, several post later about "what counts as sound" "how long a horse typically 'lasts'", "what contributes to a horse's long-term soundness," one of my original questions still remains. I think someone ought to do a longevity study for horses shown in futurities versus those that are not. Perhaps one already exists?

                                        Again, sorry if this offends, too.
                                        The problem with that study is everybody's program to get ready for any of those events is going to vary. Some people over drill for perfection, some go with whatever they get after 5 jumps.

                                        I think genetics also plays a role. You could have a 6 YO who has done very minimal work u/s that needs his hocks injected. Or you could have a horse that is 16 YO getting injected for the first time.

                                        And sometimes it's just a crap shoot. As careful as you are & do what you feel is "right" for your horse, it could still happen that they need some maint starting at a younger age.
                                        "I'm not crazy...my mother had me tested"

                                        Comment

                                        Working...
                                        X