• Welcome to the Chronicle Forums.
    Please complete your profile. The forums and the rest of www.chronofhorse.com has single sign-in, so your log in information for one will automatically work for the other. Disclaimer: The opinions expressed here are the views of the individual and do not necessarily reflect the views and opinions of The Chronicle of the Horse.

Announcement

Collapse

Forum rules and no-advertising policy

As a participant on this forum, it is your responsibility to know and follow our rules. Please read this message in its entirety.

Board Rules

1. You’re responsible for what you say.
As outlined in Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act, The Chronicle of the Horse and its affiliates, as well Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd., the developers of vBulletin, are not legally responsible for statements made in the forums.

This is a public forum viewed by a wide spectrum of people, so please be mindful of what you say and who might be reading it—details of personal disputes are likely better handled privately. While posters are legally responsible for their statements, the moderators may in their discretion remove or edit posts that violate these rules. Users have the ability to modify or delete their own messages after posting, but administrators generally will not delete posts, threads or accounts upon request.

Outright inflammatory, vulgar, harassing, malicious or otherwise inappropriate statements and criminal charges unsubstantiated by a reputable news source or legal documentation will not be tolerated and will be dealt with at the discretion of the moderators.

2. Conversations in horse-related forums should be horse-related.
The forums are a wonderful source of information and support for members of the horse community. While it’s understandably tempting to share information or search for input on other topics upon which members might have a similar level of knowledge, members must maintain the focus on horses.

3. Keep conversations productive, on topic and civil.
Discussion and disagreement are inevitable and encouraged; personal insults, diatribes and sniping comments are unproductive and unacceptable. Whether a subject is light-hearted or serious, keep posts focused on the current topic and of general interest to other participants of that thread. Utilize the private message feature or personal email where appropriate to address side topics or personal issues not related to the topic at large.

4. No advertising in the discussion forums.
Posts in the discussion forums directly or indirectly advertising horses, jobs, items or services for sale or wanted will be removed at the discretion of the moderators. Use of the private messaging feature or email addresses obtained through users’ profiles for unsolicited advertising is not permitted.

Company representatives may participate in discussions and answer questions about their products or services, or suggest their products on recent threads if they fulfill the criteria of a query. False "testimonials" provided by company affiliates posing as general consumers are not appropriate, and self-promotion of sales, ad campaigns, etc. through the discussion forums is not allowed.

Paid advertising is available on our classifieds site and through the purchase of banner ads. The tightly monitored Giveaways forum permits free listings of genuinely free horses and items available or wanted (on a limited basis). Items offered for trade are not allowed.

Advertising Policy Specifics
When in doubt of whether something you want to post constitutes advertising, please contact a moderator privately in advance for further clarification. Refer to the following points for general guidelines:

Horses – Only general discussion about the buying, leasing, selling and pricing of horses is permitted. If the post contains, or links to, the type of specific information typically found in a sales or wanted ad, and it’s related to a horse for sale, regardless of who’s selling it, it doesn’t belong in the discussion forums.

Stallions – Board members may ask for suggestions on breeding stallion recommendations. Stallion owners may reply to such queries by suggesting their own stallions, only if their horse fits the specific criteria of the original poster. Excessive promotion of a stallion by its owner or related parties is not permitted and will be addressed at the discretion of the moderators.

Services – Members may use the forums to ask for general recommendations of trainers, barns, shippers, farriers, etc., and other members may answer those requests by suggesting themselves or their company, if their services fulfill the specific criteria of the original post. Members may not solicit other members for business if it is not in response to a direct, genuine query.

Products – While members may ask for general opinions and suggestions on equipment, trailers, trucks, etc., they may not list the specific attributes for which they are in the market, as such posts serve as wanted ads.

Event Announcements – Members may post one notification of an upcoming event that may be of interest to fellow members, if the original poster does not benefit financially from the event. Such threads may not be “bumped” excessively. Premium members may post their own notices in the Event Announcements forum.

Charities/Rescues – Announcements for charitable or fundraising events can only be made for 501(c)(3) tax-exempt organizations. Special exceptions may be made, at the moderators’ discretion and direction, for board-related events or fundraising activities in extraordinary circumstances.

Occasional posts regarding horses available for adoption through IRS-registered horse rescue or placement programs are permitted in the appropriate forums, but these threads may be limited at the discretion of the moderators. Individuals may not advertise or make announcements for horses in need of rescue, placement or adoption unless the horse is available through a recognized rescue or placement agency or government-run entity or the thread fits the criteria for and is located in the Giveaways forum.

5. Do not post copyrighted photographs unless you have purchased that photo and have permission to do so.

6. Respect other members.
As members are often passionate about their beliefs and intentions can easily be misinterpreted in this type of environment, try to explore or resolve the inevitable disagreements that arise in the course of threads calmly and rationally.

If you see a post that you feel violates the rules of the board, please click the “alert” button (exclamation point inside of a triangle) in the bottom left corner of the post, which will alert ONLY the moderators to the post in question. They will then take whatever action, or no action, as deemed appropriate for the situation at their discretion. Do not air grievances regarding other posters or the moderators in the discussion forums.

Please be advised that adding another user to your “Ignore” list via your User Control Panel can be a useful tactic, which blocks posts and private messages by members whose commentary you’d rather avoid reading.

7. We have the right to reproduce statements made in the forums.
The Chronicle of the Horse may copy, quote, link to or otherwise reproduce posts, or portions of posts, in print or online for advertising or editorial purposes, if attributed to their original authors, and by posting in this forum, you hereby grant to The Chronicle of the Horse a perpetual, non-exclusive license under copyright and other rights, to do so.

8. We reserve the right to enforce and amend the rules.
The moderators may delete, edit, move or close any post or thread at any time, or refrain from doing any of the foregoing, in their discretion, and may suspend or revoke a user’s membership privileges at any time to maintain adherence to the rules and the general spirit of the forum. These rules may be amended at any time to address the current needs of the board.

Please see our full Terms of Service and Privacy Policy for more information.

Thanks for being a part of the COTH forums!

(Revised 1/26/16)
See more
See less

girth rubs from a County Logic girth?

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • girth rubs from a County Logic girth?

    Any idea how to deal with rubs from a County logic contoured girth? I just got a new horse and I rode him in it for two weeks with no problems, then on my last ride I saw a sore about the size and shape of my thumb. It's maybe two and a half inches long by about an inch wide, and it's just behind the elbow on his right side. I had the girth on correctly (one side faces forward b/c it's contoured).

    I brought the County girth home and oiled it and oiled it until it wouldn't take any more oil. In fairness it was pretty stiff when I was using it! But I also have a fuzzy girth I can use if I can't make the County one work.

    Any experience with this? Will the oil help? Or am I stuck not being able to use my good girth?
    Wild men who caught and sang the sun in flight, / And learn, too late, they grieved it on its way, / Do not go gentle into that good night. -- Dylan Thomas

  • #2
    That's a shame! Logic girths are supposed to be designed not to rub, aren't they?

    Maybe see if you can find a girth cover that will work with the girth... I think the Ovation Girth Sock might be stretchy enough to fit it.

    Comment


    • #3
      How far behind the elbow? If it's *right* there, then the girth, and the saddle, are too far forward.
      ______________________________
      The CoTH CYA - please consult w/your veterinarian under any and all circumstances. - ET

      Comment


      • #4
        Are you sure you've got it the right way around? I hooked mine up one day, rushing, and poor horse had a nice little girth gall within about 20 minutes.

        There is one US saddler - can't remember which - which sells them on their website, and even has a nice photo of horsey tacked up and ready to go, wearing its Logic girth....the wrong way round...

        Just a suggestion - don't mean to be snarky!

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by GGsuperpony View Post
          In fairness it was pretty stiff when I was using it! But I also have a fuzzy girth I can use if I can't make the County one work.
          I'd work on getting the girth into good condition and then try again. Any dirt or stiff spots could be the cause of a girth sore. Think about it: would you rather wear boots or shoes that have been broken in and well conditioned or a pair that aren't soft?

          If it still rubs when it's clean and in good condition, then you may need to use a cover or different girth.
          ***Honorary Member of the "What is BOSS?" Cult...er...CLIQUE***
          ***Prominent Member of the 'Irrelevent Posters Clique'***
          CrayolaPosse ~ Bluegreen

          Comment


          • #6
            I have been using Logic for a few years now and nothing else. It is the only girth that does not make the ponies "girthy" and keeps the saddle in place (fat round ponies). I have also used them on other horses of all shapes and sizes. I have never had a sore or rub from these girths. Maybe it is the conformation of your horse??
            Proud to have two Takaupa Gold line POAs!
            Takaupas Top Gold
            Gifts Black Gold Knight

            Comment


            • #7
              Why does the County girth work?

              Lori-- glad you dig these girths. Can you explain how they work? It seems to me that once you have them tight enough to hold a saddle on, the tension between the billets will effectively travel in a straight line. In that case, what difference does the slight wave (for an extra $125 or so) make?

              Thanks. I've always been curious.

              -mvp
              The armchair saddler
              Politically Pro-Cat

              Comment


              • #8
                They don't hold up!

                I got a County Logic Girth 4 years ago when I got a new saddle. I oiled it once and then just cleaned it occassionally with saddle soap. The hide got these funky patches that eventually dried up and got stiff and ripped. I sent several emails to the County people on the website and never heard back from them ....crappy.

                Comment

                • Original Poster

                  #9
                  Thanks for the info, everyone!

                  mcm - Good suggestion - I think I will just wait until the spot heals completely and then try it again. If it still doesn't work I guess I will have to just use a different girth.

                  JB - I don't think it's too far forward but once the sore heals and I try it on again I will double check. The sore is a few inches from the soft skin behind his elbow, and it was definitely caused by the front side of the girth. Still worth checking into, though...

                  Rye - sorry to hear yours didn't hold up! I haven't had that problem with mine but maybe I have been lucky. I don't take care of it as well as I should but I haven't had any problems until now, and I've had it for five years as my main girth.

                  mvp - I also love mine, but I admit I'm not sure if the contoured thing is worth a lot of extra $$$. I only have it because when my uncle gave me his daughter's horse a few years ago I got all her tack including this girth. My old one is not nearly as nice. I actually think the best value in girths is the $30 fuzzy ones. They are nice enough to show in, washable, and cheap enough to be disposable if they get ruined. Like Rye said, if you buy an expensive girth and it falls apart that can be really distressing! So as much as I like it, I don't think I personally would invest in another one.
                  Wild men who caught and sang the sun in flight, / And learn, too late, they grieved it on its way, / Do not go gentle into that good night. -- Dylan Thomas

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    I have a super sensitive mare prone to rubs, and put the County Logic on from day one with a girth sock. Two rides, and had quarter sized rubs. Can't use it.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      mvp - I like "anatomical" girths (I have a Pessoa, Dover, and working on a third), because my Morgans both have a more forward girth groove; with a regular girth, in order to have it where it's *supposed* to be, it means the saddle is too far forward. With the anatomical girths, I am able to put the saddle where it belongs, and the girth can also be in a more correct position.

                      I personally don't care for the leather of the County Logic girths, which is why I have the other brands. I find the leather of them to be nicer, even the Dover.
                      If we have to nail on talent, it's not talent.
                      Founder, Higher Standards Leather Care Addicts Anonymous

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by mvp View Post
                        Lori-- glad you dig these girths. Can you explain how they work? It seems to me that once you have them tight enough to hold a saddle on, the tension between the billets will effectively travel in a straight line. In that case, what difference does the slight wave (for an extra $125 or so) make?

                        Thanks. I've always been curious.

                        -mvp
                        For my ponies, the wave keeps the saddle in place, not sliding forward like it did with conventional girths. It also took the irritablility away when I am girthing up. As long as the saddle fits the horse correctly (too narrow and it will still work, too wide and it willl still slide forward), I have found that these girths are the best. I have 3 different sizes here that I have bought over the years, that is how much I like them! There are knock offs out there that may be cheaper, but I am not sure if they work the same. I have my Stabilizer made with dressage billets so I am using the dressage girth and the knock offs don't come in browns.
                        Proud to have two Takaupa Gold line POAs!
                        Takaupas Top Gold
                        Gifts Black Gold Knight

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          I had a County Logic girth and used it for a few years with no issues at all. Then I leased my horse out (with his tack) to someone at the barn. She called me in a panic that he had a huge girth sore in exactly the place you are describing. We went over the "tacking up procedure" again and she had in fact put the girth on backwards. It's easy to do! When put on correctly, the girth should be nowhere near the elbow, it actually curves away from that area.

                          That said, I don't think they have any great advantage over traditional (and less expensive) girths. But I didn't have any complaints about it - you just have to use it in the correct direction.
                          "A goal without a plan is just a wish."

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            So remind me which way again - I haven't used mine in a while.

                            Thanks

                            Comment

                            • Original Poster

                              #15
                              I don't have a pic of it on correctly, but I will post one when I can.

                              CAJumper - I can definitely see how backwards would cause rubs, but it was for sure on the right way. I'm kinda picky about it.

                              But all the advice has helped me get to the root of the problem. I spent a long time looking at said beastie today, and I noticed again how narrow he is at the shoulder and at the bottom of his barrel behind his elbow. He is incredibly, horribly out of shape. (I just got him from a girl who was only able to ride him three times or so in the last year.)

                              Of course in and of itself this narrowness at top and bottom is no problem, but this horse is F-A-T. Seriously, seriously fat. It caused the girth to "gap" when he moved and then come in contact with his side when he straightened, I *think* anyway. So I am still going to try it on him again after it heals completely, but I may wait until he isn't built like a beach ball to use it! Once it stays completely in contact with his side even when I stretch his leg forward I will give it another go. In the meantime, I'll get my money's worth out of the fuzzy one.

                              Thanks again everyone for all your help! Otis, I will take a pic of it on my other horse showing how it should look, unless CAJumper has one?
                              Wild men who caught and sang the sun in flight, / And learn, too late, they grieved it on its way, / Do not go gentle into that good night. -- Dylan Thomas

                              Comment


                              • #16
                                Ok, a couple things. I realize that some people are disheartened with County--admittedly, I have not enjoyed have to get my saddle reflocked time and time again--but they know how to do a girth. Whoever mentioned the Dover anatomical girth, sorry I had a poor experience with one, both in terms of leather quality (did not take oil well) and then major issues with the elastic wearing super thin. My County Logic took awhile to really "break in," but it took oil readily and regularly along with wiping down tack every day. I know someone mentioned the "grunge" build up, well that's what happens to tack you don't wipe down after each ride. It's happened with all girths I had before the logic and before I finally saw the light and started enjoying cleaning my tack. The elastic is incredibly thick, and I must say, for four years mine has held up remarkably well. There are definately signs of wear and getting stretched a bit from all the different horses I've been on the last two years, but it's still a great working girth.

                                The thing I like about it over other anatomical girths is that it forces you to place the saddle in the right position. There is such a tendency (which drives me crazy) to place the saddle very forward, and quite simply, maybe only 5% of the equine population need that kind of placement. The rest of them do much better having that shoulder muscle freed up. With the saddle moved back and out of the horse's front end, those muscles up in front--like the equivalent of lats/pecs in humans (sorry my equine anatomy is not that specific)--have a greater range of motion, therefore the horse moves more freely and makes the most of their conformation both in terms of movement and jump. My last horse had an incredible range of motion in his shoulder, and it was apparent over jumps. When I got him in the county girth, there was definately a change in his motion--he had a lot more freedom with his front end to stretch and move out, and it really boosted progess with our collected work as he became more and more comfortable with the concepts of "lengthen" and "collect."

                                I really am baffled as to people saying County (or any other anatomical girth for that matter) could be giving their horses shoulder rubs. The only thing I can think of is that they are placing the saddle way too far forward to where the girth is almost touching behind the shoulder--and it shouldn't do that. The only other thiing I can think of is the horse being sensitive skin, which, in that case, I would either go neoprene girth or genuine sheepskin. Before utilizing the county girth or any other anatomical girth I would oil and manually "break it" a few times. Here are a couple pics of how the girth should look.

                                http://www.facebook.com/photo.php?pi...&id=1120680219 forgive the extravagance, but you can clearly see what direction the girth should be put on.
                                http://www.facebook.com/photo.php?pi...&id=1120680219 you can see how the girth grooves and then fits underneath the horse.
                                http://www.facebook.com/photo.php?pi...&id=1120680219 kind of a vague shot, but hope it gives you some idea about where the saddle's placed on the flat.

                                Comment


                                • #17
                                  Originally posted by Pony+ an inch View Post
                                  Ok, a couple things. I realize that some people are disheartened with County--admittedly, I have not enjoyed have to get my saddle reflocked time and time again--but they know how to do a girth. Whoever mentioned the Dover anatomical girth, sorry I had a poor experience with one, both in terms of leather quality (did not take oil well) and then major issues with the elastic wearing super thin. My County Logic took awhile to really "break in," but it took oil readily and regularly along with wiping down tack every day.
                                  I have no vendetta against County; in fact, I would love a County saddle. However, I am just not impressed with the quality of leather used on their Logic girth for the price they charge. I have seen them new, lightly used, and very used; to me, they're just icky and don't hold up as well as the price tag would suggest they should. So I got the Dover version for significantly less, and have lower expectations for the price. I'm happy with my girth; I'm glad you like yours.
                                  If we have to nail on talent, it's not talent.
                                  Founder, Higher Standards Leather Care Addicts Anonymous

                                  Comment


                                  • #18
                                    Originally posted by Pony+ an inch View Post
                                    The thing I like about it over other anatomical girths is that it forces you to place the saddle in the right position.
                                    How does this girth force things more so than another anatomical girth? The girth should have no bearing on where you place the saddle. You should be putting the saddle in the right place to begin with, and THEN address the girth issue. One can still put the saddle too far forward with an anatomical girth.

                                    There is such a tendency (which drives me crazy) to place the saddle very forward,
                                    Agree, very common

                                    and quite simply, maybe only 5% of the equine population need that kind of placement.
                                    I'm trying to envision why a horse would NEED the saddle too far forward

                                    The rest of them do much better having that shoulder muscle freed up. With the saddle moved back and out of the horse's front end, those muscles up in front--like the equivalent of lats/pecs in humans (sorry my equine anatomy is not that specific)--have a greater range of motion, therefore the horse moves more freely and makes the most of their conformation both in terms of movement and jump.
                                    Not to mention you aren't causing muscle damage

                                    I really am baffled as to people saying County (or any other anatomical girth for that matter) could be giving their horses shoulder rubs. The only thing I can think of is that they are placing the saddle way too far forward to where the girth is almost touching behind the shoulder--and it shouldn't do that.
                                    Agree, which is why I mentioned that right off the bat. If the elbow area is being rubbed by the girth, then either the saddle is too far forward to begin with, or some combination of where the girth billets are (ie far back) and having a regular girth and having a forward girth groove are pulling the saddle forward. Shouldn't happen.
                                    ______________________________
                                    The CoTH CYA - please consult w/your veterinarian under any and all circumstances. - ET

                                    Comment


                                    • #19
                                      Originally posted by pattnic View Post
                                      I have no vendetta against County; in fact, I would love a County saddle. However, I am just not impressed with the quality of leather used on their Logic girth for the price they charge.
                                      County Logic seems to be in the realm of the M. Toulouse saddles - love them or hate them. I see people, regarding the saddles, say "leather feels like cardboard, seat stiff as a board!!" and the next post is "leather is really nice, seat so cushy!"

                                      I have already found the anatomical girth I will try if I need to - Kentaur
                                      ______________________________
                                      The CoTH CYA - please consult w/your veterinarian under any and all circumstances. - ET

                                      Comment


                                      • #20
                                        Originally posted by JB View Post
                                        How does this girth force things more so than another anatomical girth? The girth should have no bearing on where you place the saddle. You should be putting the saddle in the right place to begin with, and THEN address the girth issue. One can still put the saddle too far forward with an anatomical girth.
                                        In my experience, although maybe I've just been lucky with all the mounts I've had to saddle, if you have the saddle too far forward, the logic girth won't lie comfortably against the horse's belly when tightened. If you haven't had the experience of using a logic girth or working with a saddle fitter, you might be unawares as to where the saddle and girth should rest on a horse. Having used another anatomical girth (the Dover one), you could still place both girth and saddle too far forward and visually have it look OK. With the Logic girth? Not really. It's fairly obvious (although it may just be me now that I've had the darn thing for so long) when the girth is placed too far forward--or even too far back!

                                        And I should have clarified my statement about County, pattnic--like JB said, County seems to be a love/hate brand. I was once a lover then a hater and now I'm just kind of in the middle (at least when it comes to saddles). I should have separated my statement about County and then the statement about the Dover girth--I did not mean to tie them together. I only wanted to comment on my experience with the dover girth which I had before the County.

                                        As for horse's who need the saddle placed more forward, I've seen a couple awkward backs in my life (one was a saddlebred, the other was unknown, tho had to have a chunk of TB, she was quite sensitive) who's confo just deemed the saddle sat more comfortably in a more forward position than backward. But otherwise, generally, the saddle sits more comfortably back.

                                        Comment

                                        Working...
                                        X