Announcement

Collapse

Forum rules and no-advertising policy

As a participant on this forum, it is your responsibility to know and follow our rules. Please read this message in its entirety.

Board Rules

1. You're responsible for what you say.
As outlined in Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act, The Chronicle of the Horse and its affiliates, as well Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd., the developers of vBulletin, are not legally responsible for statements made in the Forums.

This is a public forum viewed by a wide spectrum of people, so please be mindful of what you say and who might be reading it--details of personal disputes may be better handled privately. While posters are legally responsible for their statements, the moderators may in their discretion remove or edit posts, though are not legally obligated to do so, regardless of content.

Users have the ability to modify or delete their own messages after posting. Moderators generally will not delete posts, threads or accounts unless they have been alerted and have determined that a post, thread or user has violated the Forums' policies. Moderators do not regularly independently monitor the Forums for such violations.

Profanity, outright vulgarity, blatant personal insults or otherwise inappropriate statements will not be tolerated and will be dealt with at the discretion of the moderators.

Users may provide their positive or negative experiences with or opinions of companies, products, individuals, etc.; however, accounts involving allegations of criminal behavior against named individuals or companies MUST be first-hand accounts and may NOT be made anonymously.

If a situation has been reported upon by a reputable news source or addressed by law enforcement or the legal system it is open for discussion, but if an individual wants to make their own claims of criminal behavior against a named party in the course of that discussion, they too must identify themselves by first and last name and the account must be first-person.

Criminal allegations that do not satisfy these requirements, when brought to our attention, may be removed pending satisfaction of these criteria, and we reserve the right to err on the side of caution when making these determinations.

Credible threats of suicide will be reported to the police along with identifying user information at our disposal, in addition to referring the user to suicide helpline resources such as 1-800-SUICIDE or 1-800-273-TALK.

2. Conversations in horse-related forums should be horse-related.
The forums are a wonderful source of information and support for members of the horse community. While it's understandably tempting to share information or search for input on other topics upon which members might have a similar level of knowledge, members must maintain the focus on horses.

3. Keep conversations productive, on topic and civil.
Discussion and disagreement are inevitable and encouraged; personal insults, diatribes and sniping comments are unproductive and unacceptable. Whether a subject is light-hearted or serious, keep posts focused on the current topic and of general interest to other participants of that thread. Utilize the private message feature or personal email where appropriate to address side topics or personal issues not related to the topic at large.

4. No advertising in the discussion forums.
Posts in the discussion forums directly or indirectly advertising horses, jobs, items or services for sale or wanted will be removed at the discretion of the moderators. Use of the private messaging feature or email addresses obtained through users' profiles for unsolicited advertising is not permitted.

Company representatives may participate in discussions and answer questions about their products or services, or suggest their products on recent threads if they fulfill the criteria of a query. False "testimonials" provided by company affiliates posing as general consumers are not appropriate, and self-promotion of sales, ad campaigns, etc. through the discussion forums is not allowed.

Paid advertising is available on our classifieds site and through the purchase of banner ads. The tightly monitored Giveaways forum permits free listings of genuinely free horses and items available or wanted (on a limited basis). Items offered for trade are not allowed.

Advertising Policy Specifics
When in doubt of whether something you want to post constitutes advertising, please contact a moderator privately in advance for further clarification. Refer to the following points for general guidelines:

Horses -- Only general discussion about the buying, leasing, selling and pricing of horses is permitted. If the post contains, or links to, the type of specific information typically found in a sales or wanted ad, and it's related to a horse for sale, regardless of who's selling it, it doesn't belong in the discussion forums.

Stallions -- Board members may ask for suggestions on breeding stallion recommendations. Stallion owners may reply to such queries by suggesting their own stallions, only if their horse fits the specific criteria of the original poster. Excessive promotion of a stallion by its owner or related parties is not permitted and will be addressed at the discretion of the moderators.

Services -- Members may use the forums to ask for general recommendations of trainers, barns, shippers, farriers, etc., and other members may answer those requests by suggesting themselves or their company, if their services fulfill the specific criteria of the original post. Members may not solicit other members for business if it is not in response to a direct, genuine query.

Products -- While members may ask for general opinions and suggestions on equipment, trailers, trucks, etc., they may not list the specific attributes for which they are in the market, as such posts serve as wanted ads.

Event Announcements -- Members may post one notification of an upcoming event that may be of interest to fellow members, if the original poster does not benefit financially from the event. Such threads may not be "bumped" excessively. Premium members may post their own notices in the Event Announcements forum.

Charities/Rescues -- Announcements for charitable or fundraising events can only be made for 501(c)(3) tax-exempt organizations. Special exceptions may be made, at the moderators' discretion and direction, for board-related events or fundraising activities in extraordinary circumstances.

Occasional posts regarding horses available for adoption through IRS-registered horse rescue or placement programs are permitted in the appropriate forums, but these threads may be limited at the discretion of the moderators. Individuals may not advertise or make announcements for horses in need of rescue, placement or adoption unless the horse is available through a recognized rescue or placement agency or government-run entity or the thread fits the criteria for and is located in the Giveaways forum.

5. Do not post copyrighted photographs unless you have purchased that photo and have permission to do so.

6. Respect other members.
As members are often passionate about their beliefs and intentions can easily be misinterpreted in this type of environment, try to explore or resolve the inevitable disagreements that arise in the course of threads calmly and rationally.

If you see a post that you feel violates the rules of the board, please click the �alert� button (exclamation point inside of a triangle) in the bottom left corner of the post, which will alert ONLY the moderators to the post in question. They will then take whatever action, or no action, as deemed appropriate for the situation at their discretion. Do not air grievances regarding other posters or the moderators in the discussion forums.

Please be advised that adding another user to your �Ignore� list via your User Control Panel can be a useful tactic, which blocks posts and private messages by members whose commentary you'd rather avoid reading.

7. We have the right to reproduce statements made in the forums.
The Chronicle of the Horse may copy, quote, link to or otherwise reproduce posts, or portions of posts, in print or online for advertising or editorial purposes, if attributed to their original authors, and by posting in this forum, you hereby grant to The Chronicle of the Horse a perpetual, non-exclusive license under copyright and other rights, to do so.

8. We reserve the right to enforce and amend the rules.
The moderators may delete, edit, move or close any post or thread at any time, or refrain from doing any of the foregoing, in their discretion, and may suspend or revoke a user's membership privileges at any time to maintain adherence to the rules and the general spirit of the forum. These rules may be amended at any time to address the current needs of the board.

Please see our full Terms of Service and Privacy Policy for more information.

Thanks for being a part of the COTH forums!

(Revised 5/9/18)
See more
See less

Advice for job interview (stablehand/groom)

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

    Advice for job interview (stablehand/groom)

    You guys!!!! I have an interview for a groom position with a college equestrian program tomorrow morning!!! What should I expect from the interview? Anything I should bone up on before tomorrow?

    And what should I wear?

    #2
    Well I havent done that job, but I was an HR manager for about 30 yrs before retiring and did a LOT of interviews.

    Things you will probably be asked will include
    Tell me about yourself - and that should include your riding and horse management experience as well as a bit about your personal life.. Not a lot of personal info but its a way to "break the ice" and chat some.

    Why are you interested in this job? Tell them what you like about the position - not that its a way to generate cash. The mgr will want someone who WANTS to do this work - not someone who will show up each day grumbling about the work.

    What other jobs have you had before? What did you like about them? What did you not like? Why did you leave? Again, the mgr is looking for someone with some stability in their work background - not someone who is likely to quit a few months down the line.
    Your attire is fine - you should be neat and dressed in a manner that would fit the job.
    Good luck!

    Comment


      #3
      Your attire is great. They would probably tell you if you would be riding, but there's no harm in throwing the clothes in your car just in case.

      Be on time. Usually for an interview you want to be early, but unless this is a huge place with a receptionist and a waiting area, showing up 15 minutes early is going to inconvenience me.

      Be polite and generally enjoyable to be around. Any decent BM can teach you how to do chores well. Being a pleasant addition to the staff will put you head and shoulders above other applicants.

      Be honest, and be willing to learn. Again, if you don't know how to give oral medications, I can teach you how to do that. (That's kinda what I'm here for.) So if I ask you if you know how, just say, "I don't have any experience with that, but I would love to learn!"

      Don't be a know it all. There are 100 ways to care for horses. I want you to care for our horses MY way. I'm open to suggestions and always excited to have a knowledgeable candidate, but if I get the feeling that you're always going to insist you're right, you're not getting the job.

      Don't mad mouth past jobs or other barns. I know this is Interviewing 101, but you would be surprised.

      Everyone interviews differently. Mine is a "working interview" and includes mucking stalls. I would brush up on your general anatomy, horse colors, and maybe common feed. I wouldn't quiz you on any of those things, but if I mention "the chestnut" and you start talking about the bay, I'm going to wonder. If you have a mini note pad that can slip in your pocket, do so. It could come in handy if you end up meeting a lot of people or your interview turns into an orientation.

      Interview the barn. This is my biggest tip! What are the hours like? What happens if your kid gets sick? Who works holidays? Are there perks like riding and boarding (and if not, are you going to be bitter watching everyone else ride day after day while you care for their animals)? Is the manager someone you want to work with/under? Do the other employees seem generally happy? Barn work is hard and the pay generally sucks, so really consider if you want the job they're offering.

      Honestly, if your OP is a true reflection of you, the barn would be lucky to have you. You sound like the type of person I would love to have on staff.

      Good luck!
      Proud member of the "I'm In My 20's and Hope to Be a Good Rider Someday" clique

      Comment


        #4
        I've never been a groom before, but any job interview I have ever had, regardless of the position, has included some type of conflict-resolution/tell me about a time when such and such happened and how you handled it type question, so I always come armed with an example fresh in my mind.

        Comment


          #5
          Originally posted by Wonders12 View Post
          Interview the barn. This is my biggest tip! What are the hours like? What happens if your kid gets sick? Who works holidays? Are there perks like riding and boarding (and if not, are you going to be bitter watching everyone else ride day after day while you care for their animals)? Is the manager someone you want to work with/under? Do the other employees seem generally happy? Barn work is hard and the pay generally sucks, so really consider if you want the job they're offering.
          Do NOT take this advice until you've already been offered the job. If you start asking about hours, perks and holidays during the interview, you will not come across as a hard worker who wants to learn!

          DO try to leave the impression that you are knowledgeable about horses, but willing to "do it their way" not always your own way. You are unafraid of hard work. You want whatever is best for the horse and the barn clients (ie, sweep the aisle and finish your stalls before their first paying client shows up). And you are easy to be with/be around, especially when something gets stressful.

          Comment


            #6
            If you are not familiar with this barn - Near the end of the interview, the interviewer should offer to give you a quick walk-through around the place. That's standard in interviewing at non-horse employment. If they overlook this, ask cheerfully and with a keen attitude if it is ok if you take a quick walk around to see it.

            You just want to see signs that you will be comfortable there. You don't expect to see red flags that things aren't done well, but if you do, this is something to be aware of before accepting a job offer, assuming one comes.

            Good luck!!!

            Comment


              #7
              If you are coming in with only a few years horse experience, make sure you are ok to handle horses that have been on layup who want to show you their altheiticism during the handwalk, catching the pony out of the turnout who may not want to leave yet and shows you by trying to kick you or just runs away, and also taking extra special care with the horses who you look at wrong, and break down somewhere. Your attitude sounds perfect, but a few years is not a ton, and I would ask if there is someone that you would be working with or trainng under.

              I was always a working student growing up, and have done EVERYTHING from Mucking stalls and handling difficult (read questionably dangerous ) horses, digging out areanas edges with a shovel, to getting to ride and handle some amazingingly nice and quality horses that I otherwise wouldn't. Stay patient, be ready, and make sure you are willing to come home physcally exhuasted when you also have a kid. I wouldn't trade my experience for anythign in the world! Good luck
              Always be yourself. Unless you can be a unicorn. Then ALWAYS be a unicorn.

              Comment


                #8
                In another context, I do tons of interviews of candidates that want to work where I do. The one that always gets my attention is the one that can tell me why they want to work here. Not just for a law firm or in law generally, but HERE. Why this firm, more than one down down the street? Convince me that you want this more than I need you.

                Also, have some questions in the can for the person interviewing you, that shows your interest but turns it around a little, and lets them "brag" a bit ...like "What makes your team stand out from the others?" "How do you see the riding program growing over the next 5 years?" "Have you had alumni that have gone on to any big riding accomplishments?" "Where do the team's horses generally come from?" and "Tell me about your dream horse for an IHSA program" When they say "Well, do you have any questions for us?" be fully locked and loaded!

                Comment


                  #9
                  working hunter...I dont think there is anything wrong with asking questions about the job. Actually I would encourage that. You do want to know about expected, hours, weekends, holidays and expectations.

                  The last thing I would want is someone to take the job and then say "gee I didnt know I had to do that...."

                  But to your point, the applicant should LISTEN, and then ask applicable questions about the job based on what they hear.

                  Comment

                    Original Poster

                    #10

                    Comment


                      #11
                      I start with taking the applicant around the farm, telling them about our routine, pointing out a few horses and giving them a general overview. IN part, I do this to get an initial impression of how they interact with the horses (timid, friendly, knowledgeable...) and, if clients are around, how they initially interact with them.

                      I DO expect them to tell me if they have children and I WILL ask how they handle child care. I ask about work experience and ask for references. I DO also ask about whether they believe they are physically capable of doing the job and if they understand that this is hard, physical labor in all weather conditions.

                      I don't ask someone to muck a stall first interview, but if there is a mutual interest after going through the details of pay, hours, etc I set up a second "working" interview or try out day (for which I pay them) so they get a feel for what we do and how. At the end of the tryout, I have a brief quiet word with my barn manager and then sit down again with the applicant to review pay, hours & duties again. THAT'S the time to ask your questions about pay, benefits, riding, etc. to make sure both you and prospective employer are on the same page.

                      Good luck!
                      "Socrates was a very wise man who went around giving good advice. They poisoned him." Anonymous...

                      Comment


                        #12
                        Originally posted by jn1193 View Post

                        I DO expect them to tell me if they have children and I WILL ask how they handle child care.
                        Um, that's illegal.....it's called discrimination.

                        http://www.eeoc.gov/laws/practices/i...tal_status.cfm

                        The following pre-employment inquiries may be regarded as evidence of intent to discriminate when asked in the pre-employment context:

                        Whether applicant is pregnant.
                        Marital status of applicant or whether applicant plans to marry.
                        Number and age of children or future child bearing plans.
                        Child care arrangements.
                        Employment status of spouse.
                        Name of spouse.
                        <3 Vinnie <3
                        1992-2010
                        Jackie's Punt ("Bailey") My Finger Lakes Finest Thoroughbred

                        Comment


                          #13
                          Originally posted by BoysNightOut View Post
                          Um, that's illegal.....it's called discrimination.

                          http://www.eeoc.gov/laws/practices/i...tal_status.cfm

                          The following pre-employment inquiries may be regarded as evidence of intent to discriminate when asked in the pre-employment context:

                          Whether applicant is pregnant.
                          Marital status of applicant or whether applicant plans to marry.
                          Number and age of children or future child bearing plans.
                          Child care arrangements.
                          Employment status of spouse.
                          Name of spouse.
                          Employers cannot outright ask "Do you have kids?" but there are ways to find out if a candidate is a parent, without outright asking about it. The interviewer can tell a story about her daughter, a story that is so interesting and funny, that the candidate may reply by saying "Oh really? Your daughter did that when she was 8? How old is she now? My little one is 5 now..." I read about a hiring manager who had pictures of kids on her desk, even though she didn't have kids, just as a ploy to see if the candidate will open up about their family.
                          If a candidate volunteers information, it is not illegal for the hiring manager to consider that information when they make their hiring decision. If the BM explains that the workweek runs from Tuesday to Sunday, the candidate may say "I can't work Sunday! I have church." So, the BM never asked the candidate about her religion, but the candidate just volunteered that information.
                          I took a human resources class last Spring, so the skills used to gather personal information out of job candidates, without violating EEOC, is really fascinating.

                          Comment


                            #14
                            i am a retired HR Manager and I wouldnt go there if I were you.

                            Comment


                              #15
                              Originally posted by equus137 View Post
                              Employers cannot outright ask "Do you have kids?" but there are ways to find out if a candidate is a parent, without outright asking about it. The interviewer can tell a story about her daughter, a story that is so interesting and funny, that the candidate may reply by saying "Oh really? Your daughter did that when she was 8? How old is she now? My little one is 5 now..." I read about a hiring manager who had pictures of kids on her desk, even though she didn't have kids, just as a ploy to see if the candidate will open up about their family.
                              If a candidate volunteers information, it is not illegal for the hiring manager to consider that information when they make their hiring decision. If the BM explains that the workweek runs from Tuesday to Sunday, the candidate may say "I can't work Sunday! I have church." So, the BM never asked the candidate about her religion, but the candidate just volunteered that information.
                              I took a human resources class last Spring, so the skills used to gather personal information out of job candidates, without violating EEOC, is really fascinating.
                              Oh, I believe it! I'm sure there are pretty shady HR departments out there. It's none of the employer's business if the candidate has children, or what their plans are for daycare. That's the potential employee's job to figure out what to do with their kids.

                              JN's post just irked me; when a BO expects a possible worker to TELL them if they have kids, and they WILL ask them what their daycare plans are is none of their damn business. You CANNOT discriminate or make a person explain their family life, even for a barn job.
                              <3 Vinnie <3
                              1992-2010
                              Jackie's Punt ("Bailey") My Finger Lakes Finest Thoroughbred

                              Comment


                                #16
                                A big part of the college teams around here is showing. You can mention organizational skills, if you are a member if any clubs, even possibly if not horsie even, if you've volunteered or scribed at shows...

                                Comment


                                  #17
                                  So, how'd the interview go? Get a job offer out of it?
                                  When opportunity knocks it's wearing overalls and looks like work.

                                  The horse world. Two people. Three opinions.

                                  Comment

                                    Original Poster

                                    #18

                                    Comment


                                      #19
                                      Good to know - thanks for the heads up. Most people I've interviewed have volunteered the information about whether they have kids and I've felt it a natural transition to ask about child care. I've had a couple of questions over the years if the interviewee can bring their child/children to the barn when they come to work. But will be more careful in the future.
                                      "Socrates was a very wise man who went around giving good advice. They poisoned him." Anonymous...

                                      Comment


                                        #20
                                        Originally posted by Linda View Post
                                        working hunter...I dont think there is anything wrong with asking questions about the job. Actually I would encourage that. You do want to know about expected, hours, weekends, holidays and expectations.

                                        The last thing I would want is someone to take the job and then say "gee I didnt know I had to do that...."

                                        But to your point, the applicant should LISTEN, and then ask applicable questions about the job based on what they hear.
                                        But you ask those questions at the point where you are getting an offer, not in the first interview. Big turn off in first interview.

                                        Comment

                                        Working...
                                        X